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How do you store your coins?

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Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
596 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  09:50 am Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Tom Goodheart to your friends list Get a Link to this Message

Slabs, slips, flips, envelopes, Whitmans, Lindners, coffee can, bottom of a drawer, old nuclear bunker?

Me? In an old wooden box.




Well, it's sort of traditional, isn't it?

Pillar of the Community
Canada
3154 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  09:53 am  Show Profile Check noahs-numismatics's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add noahs-numismatics to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice! I like it!
My want list!

Check out my website!
Buying and Selling Currency of all types and years:
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Pillar of the Community
United States
1200 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  10:27 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Fat Freddy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There's been considerable CCF discussion about storing coins and a lot of input leans toward wood not being the best storage enclosure material because
it may lead to tarnishing (which some favor but most don't). I don't know what metal the oldies in your picture are made of, but your wooden display shelf
may be accelerating tarnishing over the long haul. Storage that provides protection against atmospheric exposure appears to be the preferred practice.

I'm not very well-versed in the chemistry behind how this happens, but others whose knowledge far exceeds mine (or "my lack of") will probably chime in
shortly. If not, search "coin storage" in the Main Coin Forum and Precious Metal Forum. That should turn up lots of experiences and opinions.

I go for the atmospheric exposure protection thing. Military surplus ammo boxes, bullion kept in mint tubes, air-tite direct-fits for my few "worth protecting"
coins (i.e: worth >$50), desiccant packs to keep humidity at bay. If you want to combine protection with display, those album pages by Dansco, Whitman
and Littleton are probably the best idea.
Caveat emptor!
Bedrock of the Community
United States
12930 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  11:01 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Whitman, Dansco, Intercept Shield Albums, plastic tubes, 2x2's, jars and numerous other methods pending my mood.
And as already noted, wood is not the best place for long term storage. Of course if it's old, really old wood, possibly all gasses that could leak out have already done so.
just carl
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
596 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  2:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Tom Goodheart to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
There's been considerable CCF discussion about storing coins and a lot of input leans toward wood not being the best storage enclosure material because
it may lead to tarnishing (which some favor but most don't). I don't know what metal the oldies in your picture are made of, but your wooden display shelf may be accelerating tarnishing over the long haul. Storage that provides protection against atmospheric exposure appears to be the preferred practice.


Interesting Freddie. My coins are 17th century silver and the shelf is actually a drawer in a mahogany coin cabinet like this one. (The 'box' comment was kinda tongue in cheek):




Here in the UK this is actually a popular way of storing coins, at least older ones. After all, after 350 years a bit more toning (or as you put it 'tarnishing' which is maybe more popular here) isn't going to hurt and it makes it easier to pick up the coins to admire them.

The mahogany has been aged properly and is a traditional way of storing coins used by dealers, museums and collectors.

I get the idea of atmospheric protection, particularly for modern coins, proofs, copper (and in particular tin) and dessicant. And some collectors here do use things like capsules, or even encapsulation (slabbing), though the latter still hasn't really caught on.

Albums? OK for modern stuff (post 1816) but trickier for earlier coins that aren't guaranteed to be uniformly round (or round at all, in some cases!)

But I rather like to see my coins laid out in their drawers and have ready access to them. Plus you can store the 'tickets' (little paper disks upon which you can write the details) with the relevant coin. Here for example are some that came with one of mine.




Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
596 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  2:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Tom Goodheart to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sorry. FreddY! Distracted trying to cook dinner and post about coins at the same time!
Valued Member
United Kingdom
428 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  3:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Demarco Bishopp to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For me the level of protection depends on the value of the coin.

- My collection of 2p coins that I've simply taken from circulation are all together inside an envelope. Nothing special.
- My pre-decimal and foreign coins and all inside cardboard coin flips and arranged in a large plastic box.
- My gold and silver coins have individual hard plastic cases. Some are Airtites, some aren't.
Coin Collecting since 2011.

Earliest pre-decimal coins: Farthing (1881), Half-Penny (1880), Penny (1797), Three-pence (1898), Six-pence (1826), Shilling (1758), Florin (1967), Half-Crown (1928), Crown (1887), Half-Sovereign (1900) Sovereign (1880).
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
3518 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  4:21 pm  Show Profile Check Ben's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Ben to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I use a box file laid flat, stored in a draw behind a door in a cupboard. Who would ever think of pulling that out and having a look?

Inside I have some old boxes from some mints which are, conveniently, 2 inches in width. I use these to hold 2x2s and supplies. My main collection of roman coins is in a small cardboard box sandwhiched in cotton wool. I also have a tin of pennies. Loose coins float about the box too. If I leave the house for an extended period, I put some paperwork on top. and pad it out so that it doesnt fling out when opened. Just looks like a normal box file. Put something bogus on the spine.

Check my eBay Listings. Lots of stuff just gone up at 99p starting bid.
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United States
21618 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  6:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Me? In an old wooden box.
Very nice!
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Valued Member
Denmark
69 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  7:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bomndk to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I had "The Crozier" mahogany cabinet from Peter Nichols for about a year, then I sold it because it could not fit in my new gun safe.
I kind of regret selling it now and I am looking for something smaller.

I am currently using 2x2 coinflips and airtight in a Lembit coin cabinet with 10 trays

I like to see a NATURAL toning on a coin.
Edited by bomndk
03/31/2013 8:01 pm
Valued Member
United States
329 Posts
 Posted 03/31/2013  8:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add FinanceGuru to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If someone created a wooden case that held coins in air-tite containers, would the tarnishing still occur or does the plastic keep it safe?
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
596 Posts
 Posted 04/01/2013  08:52 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Tom Goodheart to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If someone created a wooden case that held coins in air-tite containers, would the tarnishing still occur or does the plastic keep it safe?


Hard to know. I'm not aware that any of the capsule type storage systems have been around long enough for us to be really sure they will prevent any changes. Certainly coins can change in earlier slabs either accidentally or on purpose.

Traditional coin cabinets are fairly safe however and the tray holes can be made pretty much any size, so I wouldn't have thought it would be difficult to find a size to accomodate air-tites. I believe makers like Lindner make plastic trays for that purpose.

But really, I guess it comes down to whether you see toning (tarnishing) as a problem or not. Me, I prefer a toned coin over a bright and shiny any day. A centuries old coin should look its age I think.


Quote:
I had "The Crozier" mahogany cabinet from Peter Nichols for about a year, then I sold it because it could not fit in my new gun safe. I kind of regret selling it now and I am looking for something smaller.


The range (though I believe Peter himself has retired) is still going bomndk. My Mascle is a smaller size. Of course, it only holds up to 390 coins as opposed to the Crozier's 1160!
Pillar of the Community
United States
525 Posts
 Posted 04/03/2013  07:59 am  Show Profile Check BamaBlue's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add BamaBlue to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've always found the balance between securing coins and having them available makes storage decisions difficult. I want to be able to view my coins, but I don't want them to become a target for someone to walk off with them. I don't live in a 'bad neighborhood', but I do believe that locks do keep honest people honest. For now, I have a few of my coin albums (Whitman Folders) in a bookshelf in my study. These Mercury dimes, Lincoln Cents, State Quarters and Liberty Walking halves are a 40 year devotion. Aside from the monetary hit, losing these treasures would be an emotional kick to the head. On my 'to do' list is to consult with a carpenter to build a nice coin storage piece of sturdy furniture. If anyone has any designs or something similar, I'd love to get some ideas.
Pillar of the Community
United States
2032 Posts
 Posted 04/03/2013  2:19 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add panzaldi to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
my individual better pieces are in airtights. my collections are in whitman slideout folders. everything is stored in a 2,000 lb safe my dad left to me...that should keep them pretty safe unless someone brings in a bulldozer or crane.
Valued Member
United States
329 Posts
 Posted 04/03/2013  11:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add FinanceGuru to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@Panzaldi - Does the 2000 lb safe include the weight of the coins inside?
Pillar of the Community
Canada
2427 Posts
 Posted 04/03/2013  11:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add nalaberong to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I know the chemistry behind tarnish! Well, some of it.

Silver reacts with sulfur in the atmosphere, not oxygen. So if you live near a refinery, silver will tarnish faster. If you rub hard-boiled eggs all over your silver coins, they will tarnish faster. But if you put them in a big hermetically sealed box, the sulfur will be completely consumed after a while and the coins will not tarnish as much.

Copper reacts with oxygen, which is a bit harder to remove from an environment, and makes up a lot more of the atmosphere. A big hermetically sealed box would still turn copper brown. A little air-tite would protect copper, though.

It gets harder with other reactive substances. Sometimes wood can give off chemicals as it ages or decays. Who knows how these will react? PVC turns things nasty. You're best off finding the least reactive things possible, which is why glass is popular for labware. Of course, you're not really mixing anything caustic (or hot - plastic melts) in your containers, so there's a bit more freedom there. Just try keeping your coins away from organic or reactive substances - if you can smell the case (indicating that it is releasing particles of some sort), it might not be the best.
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