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Mythology On Coins. Post Yours...

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 Posted 06/20/2022  09:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
1901 Republique Francaise. 10 Centimes.
Outstanding!
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 Posted 06/22/2022  01:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add captainmandrake1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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1973 Greece.
10 Drachmai Regime of the Colonels.

Wow, beautiful! This is a really nice series.
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 Posted 06/22/2022  01:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add captainmandrake1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Hildegard the Valkyrie. She looks a little like a Slavic boy, though---her face, of course, not the rest!


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 Posted 06/22/2022  09:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chafemasterj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Hildegard the Valkyrie.


What a cool coin. I love the reverse.
Check out my counterstamped Lincoln Cent collection:
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 Posted 07/15/2022  06:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add LaoPhil to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The abduction of Europe by Zeus as a bull, Cyprus 2002:

The design was taken from a silver coin of Timochares, King of ancient Marion, End of 5th century to beginning of 4th century BCE. The old coin on postcard, stamp and postmark:

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 Posted 07/15/2022  08:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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The abduction of Europe by Zeus as a bull, Cyprus 2002:
Fantastic!
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 Posted 07/28/2022  2:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a commemorative medal that incorporates Norse mythology...

The 1925 US Norse-American Centennial medal was struck to commemorate "the arrival in the United States of the first shipload of Norse immigrants on board the sloop Restaurationen'" they arrived in New York City in 1825 and many made their way west to present-day Minnesota. The first arrival was celebrated in Minnesota in 1925 on the Minnesota State Fair Grounds June 6th through June 9th.

A large Viking longship is included within the design on each side of the medal - the medal is the work of James Earle Fraser (of Indian Head / "Buffalo" nickel fame). The prow of the ship features a dragonhead that was meant to scare an enemy and ward off evil spirits. Interesting side note, the dragonhead was to be removed (or at least covered) before entering home country waters so as not to scare off the country's friendly spirits.

Iceland even codified the dragon removal requirement - one look at the Coat-of-Arms of Iceland gives you an immediate sense of the high regard Icelanders had/have for the protective powers of its mythological "good spirits."

Government of Iceland description of the shield within its Coat-of-Arms:

"The shield bearers are the four guardian spirits of Iceland as described in Heimskringla [by Snorri Sturluson, 13th century]: A bull on the right side of the shield; a giant, on the left; a vulture on the right above the bull; and a dragon on the left, above the giant."

Not all Viking ships included a dragonhead (sometimes referred to as a serpanthead), just those that were larger, of important stature and/or owned by royalty and important figures/leaders (such as Leif Erikson). The ships are often referred to as "dragonships."

Good and evil spirits were an important part of Norse mythology, and staying in favor of the good spirits was not a matter to be taken lightly!






Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 07/28/2022  3:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chafemasterj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is one of my favorite coins of all time. . .



Thanks for reminding me Commems.
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 Posted 07/29/2022  5:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I bought several of those 1925 Norse thick back in the mid 60's. $25 a pop back then, I made a killing selling them for $30 each. Now look at the price.
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 Posted 07/29/2022  5:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That Hildegard the Valkyrie is one great design, a real beauty.
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 Posted 08/07/2022  09:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The three commemorative coins struck for the inauguration of the US-Philippines Commonwealth each features the Philippines Commonwealth Coat-of-Arms on its reverse. Within the CoA on each coin, in the lower portion of the center oval, is seen a mythical sea lion holding a sword. The sea lion of mythology is a creature that features the head and upper body of a lion, but with the mid-section and tail of a fish.

Within the Philippines, use of the sea lion dates to its colonial days under Spain when it was incorporated into the Arms of Manila and represented Spain's control/ownership of the islands. The sea lion was maintained by the Philippines in its later Coats-of-Arms, but was then used to represent the authority of the local Philippines government.

US-Philippines Commonwealth Coat-of-Arms


1936 Philippines Commonwealth - 50 Centavos


1936 Philippines Commonwealth - One Peso / Murphy-Quezon


1936 Philippines Commonwealth - One Peso / Roosevelt-Quezon



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/07/2022  11:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add datadragon to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One of the important deities from Egyptian religion and mythology. Horus, the source of the famous symbol known as the Eye of Horus in a 2 oz silver Antique Ultra High Relief of the Egyptian Gods Series. Features Horus' figure as popularly captured in ancient Egyptian art. When depicted in works of art and statues, Horus is shown as a muscular male figure with the head of a falcon. He stands here in left-profile relief with his right hand clutching a staff as he holds onto the Ankh symbol in his left hand, a symbol that represents the concept of eternal life. In the lower-left field, the round design element displays a falcon, the hieroglyphic representation of Horus, as well as the Eye of Horus. In the background, the 2 oz Horus Rounds offer a unique addition that showcases the silhouette of another deity. In this case, Horus' opposing god, Set, is featured in the background. The inclusion of the cobra is important as many depictions of Horus from Egyptian records include a crown with a cobra representative of the pharaohs.

Horus served many purposes in Egyptian religion and mythology, but arguably the most important was that of the God of Kingship. He was closely associated with the pharaohs in life, with his father Osiris associated with the pharaohs in death. In fact, Horus is a major player in the Osiris myth, one of ancient Egypt's most important myths. The god known as Set killed Osiris, his brother, and dismembered him. Osiris' wife, Isis, collected his body parts and revived him just long enough to conceive a son, Horus. Set had killed Osiris to assume power, but Horus would eventually engage in an extended conflict with Set that would cost Horus one of his eyes. However, his eyesight was restored by another god and resulted in the development of the popular symbol known as the Eye of Horus.


Edited by datadragon
08/07/2022 11:17 am
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 Posted 08/07/2022  3:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kopper Ken to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice Egyptian piece and info, data dragon.

KK
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