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Selling Coins At Post Offices?

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Valued Member
United States
109 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  08:04 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add russell1256 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Canada's mint offerings are available at their post offices, why don't we do that here in the US? I thinks the mine would sell a lot more set, of all kinds. Does this just make to much sense?
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United States
5003 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  08:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For a long time the US Mint had a sales office at Union Station in DC. Every time I was in DC I would stop by and pick up a few coins. I once asked if they sold a lot and her answer was no. Typical collectors just buy from the website, everyone that picks up here is giving them away as gifts hence why we don't sell most of what is on the website.

Maybe that is why the US mint doesn't sell anywhere but online and at the mints.
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
19595 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  08:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A good range of Royal Australian Mint products are also readily available at almost every Post Office in Australia, for over the counter purchase.

Occasionally, there are even combined coin/stamp collector offerings.

Although I am not a collector of modern mint product of any country, a do nevertheless take more than a passing interest in what is available, when visiting any post Office.

In Europe, bullion coins produced by national Mints can be easily purchased through the banks.
The U.S. Mint could do the same thing for ASE's to be sold through the U.S. Post Office system.
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United States
8072 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  08:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'd be good with the mint selling at Costco. Imagine pallets full of mint products next to the wine section, and maybe some specially boxed accumulations of rolled coin.
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United Kingdom
10356 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  08:57 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In the UK most main post offices back in the 1980s and 1990s sold a range of recent Royal Mint coin issues. However, in recent years most of the large, old post office buildings have been closed and post office counters relocated inside other stores, where there is no room to display or sell coins.
Edited by NumisRob
01/21/2022 08:58 am
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17211 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  10:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add T-BOP to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I'd be good with the mint selling at Costco.

Or the Dollar Tree ,better yet 7-11 .

In Memory of Butch L.
and Jim U. rest in peace .
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United States
112350 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  11:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It would be nice if they were sold in more convenient locations... thirty years ago. I am fine with ordering online now and I have zero desire to ever go to a post office again... or Costco (I let the wife handle that).
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Canada
5975 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  11:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add mcshilling to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Our main PO sells a lot of different coins and sets and you get them for the same price that the RCM sells them for BUT you don't have to pay the shipping cost. Also after a year or more they put a discounted price on the older ones.
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 Posted 01/21/2022  6:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add BStrauss3 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Aren't the RCM, RAM, et al units of the C and A et al government?

The USPS is a private corporation owned by the USG. They would actually have to come to some kind of contractual agreement. Besides, the clerks can't manage to sell stamps, can you imagine what happens if you expect them to sell other products?
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47 year / Life ANA member (joined 12/1/1973)
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Canada
2917 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2022  7:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Shoppers drug mart is usually where I see display cases of mint sets, medalions,proofs etc. They are always the dame price as the RCM website and they have more then one of each so you could look at several exemples before choosing the coin or set you want.
Edited by Wrekkdd
01/21/2022 7:47 pm
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Canada
5975 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2022  09:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add mcshilling to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Shoppers drug mart is usually where I see display cases of mint sets,


Yes but that is also a Post Office.
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Canada
2917 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2022  12:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
[Yes but that is also a Post Office.]


Sorry forgot to add that. Drug store post offices are mite common and all over the place. I dont kniw even where the non shoppers drug mart post offices are.
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Australia
19595 Posts
 Posted 01/23/2022  12:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
BStrauss3: good question.
Your assumption is correct, - at least for Oz.
Valued Member
United States
91 Posts
 Posted 01/23/2022  8:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coinnewcomer1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Bstrauss3 - I agree about the ignorance of USPS offering by postal clerks in the US. It isn't profound but rather there are always different issues being put forth and as the USPS provides money orders and accepts passport applications I think philatelic knowledge has taken a back seat. USPS did have some post offices decades ago with a philatelic desk but most or all have been discontinued and centralized to the fulfillment center/online store. I think that is a shame as it hurts USPS' sales of its products. It would be great if in large to moderate size cities they had one post office with a philatelic desk a few days a week.

Now as for selling coins - sorry but too much of a security risk and as one collector friend expressed, if it weren't for the bullion stackers, I am unsure coin collecting would be doing as well as it is doing now --- many were burned by the huge bubble in numismatic products from 1986 - 1992 and still have not recouped some of what they spent on numismatic coins (think of it this way, at the time people were spending $400 for mid-grade mint state Walking Liberty halves from after 1934 when today you could get such coins at half or a little less that amount). Commemorative coin sales have been declining for decades and for some issues the amount sold put them in the rarity range with mintages well below 5,000 but with the problem they have a very high survival rate and the US Mint premiums for these is exceptionally high (same goes for the gold First Spouses coins which may become incredibly valuable rarities if you are fortunate to have heirs willing to hold onto them for at least 40 or more years!). The only product I could see the post office selling would be the equivalent of the souvenir sets the individual mints used to sell and a few low value commemoratives such as the half dollar clads. But again you are burdening the USPS clerk with yet more work. I doubt they would want this extra task.
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United States
112350 Posts
 Posted 01/24/2022  10:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
USPS did have some post offices decades ago with a philatelic desk
I remember these. It was many years ago when I collected stamps (early 1980s). Not all branches had them.
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Australia
14264 Posts
 Posted 01/24/2022  8:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think it's a matter of the USPS and the US Mint seeing each other as rivals for the attention of collectors, rather than as potentially mutually beneficial partners.

This lack of co-operation is also evident in the lack of official PNCs - "philatelic-numismatic covers". Britain, Australia, Canada and most other countries in the western world have for decades now been issuing government-authorized PNCs, where the mint makes a commemorative coin, the post office makes a commemorative stamp on the same theme, and the two items are combined into one product, the PNC - which is an officially-issued first-day-cover with a coin attached to it. The resultant PNCs are marketed and sold by both the mint and the post office with the profits shared between them. At first they were written off as gimmicky, but they've become very popular mainstream collectables, especially for the people who like to collect both coins and stamps.

In the US, all the PNCs you might find on the market are privately-made concoctions, filling the perceived need because the US Mint and USPS do not and apparently cannot co-operate to produce a joint official product.

Another factor is the increasingly privatized nature of the post office shop in this country. Once upon a time, all you could do in a post office here in Australia was postal-related things. Then you could start to do other government business at post offices - deposits and withdrawals with the government-owned bank, paying bills for government-owned utilities, getting passport photos taken, that sort of thing. Then the post offices got franchised out, and post shop owners needed to find lots of other things to sell and make profits on, since selling postage isn't profitable (they are required, by law, to not sell postage stamps at anything other than face value). These days, there is very often a huge queue in your typical shopping centre post office, but practically nobody in the queue is actually sending mail, and there's everything from coins to children's books to Christmas cards for sale on the shelves, with actual postal products relegated to a small corner of the shop. So coins are just one of the non-postal products they sell.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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