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Some Fun Colonial Coins - Coin #1

 
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 Posted 05/08/2022  11:13 pm Show Profile   Check westcoin's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add westcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Not mine, though I'd love to have them both I thought I'd have some fun and see what you all thought of these two colonial coins. Can you guess what the coin is, the grade each got and the value of each?

This one is a challenge without extensive previous colonial knowledge and a Red Book at hand.

First coin up is graded by PCGS:



"Buy the Book Before You Buy the Coin" - Aaron R. Feldman - "And read it" - Me 2013!
ANA Life Member #3288 in good standing since 1982, Early American Coppers Member (EAC) #6202, Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4), Conder Token Collector Club (CTCC), & Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS) Member, 2 variety collector.

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Edited by westcoin
05/08/2022 11:17 pm
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 Posted 05/09/2022  12:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Slider23 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
All I could remember was a colonel with a pine tree. I have to pass on grade as I looked the coin up. Thanks for posting as very interesting coin.
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 Posted 05/09/2022  01:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is the 1776 New Hampshire Pine Tree Copper. I actually know this coin so I won't give the grade. Last year I considered purchasing the Garrett specimen which was VG10 but didn't come to a deal. The coin is rare with about 10 examples known.
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 Posted 05/09/2022  05:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin whatever it may be.
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 Posted 05/11/2022  8:00 pm  Show Profile   Check westcoin's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add westcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Numismatic Student has been doing his research and called this one exactly correct. Here is the slab, then following the photo the Heritage description from the sale oh and the price?

This one sold for $120,000 or $144,000 with the juice.




Quote:
1776 COPPER New Hampshire Pine Tree Copper, Breen-708, Whitman-8395, High R.7, Good 6 PCGS. CAC.
Ex: Green / Newman.


142.0 grains, 99% copper, per NGC test results.

The obverse of this simply designed copper features a tall Pine Tree with the legend AMERICAN LIBERTY, while the reverse depicts a harp with the date 1776. Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia lists six different varieties under the heading New Hampshire Coppers, but that illustrated and offered here is the only variety that is considered a genuine New Hampshire copper. Sylvester S. Crosby reproduced the legislation in Early Coins of America and noted that a copy of the original record of March 13, 1776 included sketched designs that are nearly identical to the few surviving examples such as this piece, formerly part of the the Eric P. Newman Collection.

Facts about these coppers are limited and surviving examples are extremely rare, although reproductions are commonplace. In his book, In Yankee Doodle's Pocket, Will Nipper writes: "New Hampshire patterns are so rare that the probability of encountering a genuine specimen is almost zero. Yet, copies number in the millions." Walter Breen estimated that eight or nine examples exist and Q. David Bowers suggested almost incredibly that as many as 32 might exist when he assigned this variety a rating of "URS-5 or 6" in the Whitman Encyclopedia of Colonial and Early American Coins. A rating of URS-4 is in line with this cataloger's experience.

The Newman coin, the Garrett example, and the example we recently offered as part of the Donald G. Partrick holdings seem to be the only three in private hands, with others in the collections of the American Numismatic Society and the Smithsonian Institution. All five examples are cast, rather than struck, perhaps unsurprising as steel for dies was unobtainable, and they were made by the silversmith, William Moulton, according to numismatic tradition. Moulton was recommended by the New Hampshire House of Representatives to produce the coins.

The cast production of these pieces undoubtedly accounts for some of the light porosity seen on known examples, all of which are low grade. The otherwise splendid surfaces are lovely golden-brown, with the principal devices on both sides outlined. The legend and date are partially visible.

The New Hampshire House of Representatives established a committee on March 13, 1776 to consider the subject of coinage, and they recommended that William Moulton produce up to 100 pounds of copper coinage to be the weight of an English halfpence (the following reproduced from Crosby):
"In the House of Representatives Mar: 13th 1776.
"Voted that a Committee be chose to Join a Committee from the Honorable Board, to confer upon the expediency of making Copper Coin & make a report to this House.
"Voted, that Capt. Pierce Long, Jonathan Lovell, Esq. & Deacon Nahum Balden be the Committee for the above mentioned purpose. P. White Speaker."
Wyseman Claggett and Benjamin Giles replied with their report the same day:
"The Committee humbly report that they find it expedient to make Copper Coin, for the Benefit of small Change, and as the Continental and other Bills are so large that William Moulton be empowered to make so many as may amount to 100 lb. [weight] subject when made to the Inspection and Direction of the General Assembly, before Circulation. Also we recommend that 108 of said Coppers be equal to one Spanish [Milled] Dollar: That the said Coin be of pure Copper and equal in [weight] to English halfpence, and bear such Device thereon as the [General] Assembly may approve. Wyseman Claggett, Chairman."


Just over three months later, on June 28, 1776, the same body voted a sum not to exceed 1,000 pounds in lawful money with a weight of five pennyweight and 10 grains each (130 grains):
"Voted, That the Treasurer of this Colony receive into the Treasury, in exchange for the Paper Bills of this Colony, any quantity of Copper Coin, made in this Colony, of the weight of five pennyweight and ten grains each, to the amount of any sum not exceeding 1,000 lawful money; three of which Coppers shall be received and paid for two pence, lawful money, in all payments; which Coppers shall have the following device, viz: A Pine tree, with the word American Liberty on one side, and a harp and the figures 1776 on the other side."


The surviving pieces all weigh between 142 and 155 grains, nearly equal to the weight of an English halfpence and 10% to 20% over the authorized weight of June 28, suggesting they were produced in reply to the original recommendation of March, and that the June 28 authorization never materialized.

Silversmith and pioneer William Moulton III was born at Newburyport, Massachusetts on July 12, 1720. He married Lydia Greenleaf on September 16, 1742, and died at Marietta, Northwest Territory (Ohio) in 1793. He plied his trade in Newburyport from 1742 to 1762, and in Hempstead, New Hampshire from 1762 until 1788, when he left for the Northwest Territory. It is likely that he is the same William Moulton who made the New Hampshire coppers, and he is undoubtedly the same man who lived his last few years in Ohio Country. The June 25, 1788 issue of the Essex Journal of Newburyport, Massachusetts published extracts of a letter "from Mr. William Moulton, to his family in Hampstead, in the state of New Hampshire." Julia Perkins Cutler, author of Founders of Ohio, related an eye-witness account of Col. Joseph Barker during the Indian Wars of 1791 that specifically mentions "old Mr. William Moulton, aged seventy, with his apron full of old goldsmith's tools." There is no doubt that William Moulton, the Massachusetts and New Hampshire silversmith who made these rare copper coins, was also the Ohio pioneer.

Listed on page 55 of the 2022 Guide Book.

Ex: Bartlett Collection (Thomas Elder, 1/1918); Waldo C. Newcomer; B. Max Mehl; "Colonel" E.H.R. Green; Green Estate; Partnership of Eric P. Newman / B.G. Johnson d.b.a. St. Louis Stamp & Coin Co.; Eric P. Newman @ $300.00; Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society; Eric P. Newman Collection, Part V (Heritage, 11/2014), lot 3025; Summer FUN Signature (Heritage, 7/2015), lot 3002.


"Buy the Book Before You Buy the Coin" - Aaron R. Feldman - "And read it" - Me 2013!
ANA Life Member #3288 in good standing since 1982, Early American Coppers Member (EAC) #6202, Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4), Conder Token Collector Club (CTCC), & Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS) Member, 2 variety collector.

See my want page: http://goccf.com/t/140440
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 Posted 05/11/2022  8:10 pm  Show Profile   Check westcoin's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add westcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
And as Numismatic Student mentioned there is the famous Garrett example - even nicer at VG10 with a little bit from the man QDB himself on it...



Numismatic Reflections by Q. David Bowers


Quote:
What a pleasure it is to be able to offer this coin again! As I write these words my mind goes back to 1979 when I immersed myself at Evergreen House, the home of T. Harrison Garrett and John Work Garrett, in Baltimore, now owned by The Johns Hopkins University, and also in the university library. The vast Garrett Collection was at hand, and I went through over 4,000 invoices, letters, and other documents pertaining to the cabinet and its formation. Ensuing months were spent in other research, resulting in the publication that autumn of The History of United States coinage as Illustrated by the Garrett Collection. The Johns Hopkins University Press considered publishing it, but estimated that only 1,000 copies would be sold over a period of 10 years. I was a bit more optimistic, and so we printed it on our own account, with a first run being 4,000 copies. These were gone in virtually an instant, and another printing was ordered. Then another. As I write these words there have been no printings for quite a few years, but perhaps 12,000 to 15,000 copies are out there in numismatic circulation.

The coinage of New Hampshire is at once rare and enigmatic. When I cataloged this very coin as lot 1323 of the Garrett Collection I noted: "The present coin is in Very Good grade and was once owned by Matthew A. Stickney, one of America's pioneer collectors. It has a pleasing light brown surface with details as illustrated."
Among the copper coinage of the states, examples of New Hampshire are far and away the rarest. The present coin has been off the market for over 30 years. Once this has sold, you may not have another opportunity to acquire on in your lifetime. The future is unknown, but what is known is that here indeed is one of the most important opportunities in early American numismatics to occur in a long time.
PCGS# 286.

Provenance: From the Matthew A. Stickney Collection; Colonel James W. Ellsworth Collection; John Work Garrett; and Bowers and Ruddy's sale of the Garrett Collection, Part 3, October 1980, lot 1323. Lot tag and special custom presentation case included both of which are available to the winning bidder upon request, Stack's Bowers at the close of the auction.
"Buy the Book Before You Buy the Coin" - Aaron R. Feldman - "And read it" - Me 2013!
ANA Life Member #3288 in good standing since 1982, Early American Coppers Member (EAC) #6202, Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4), Conder Token Collector Club (CTCC), & Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS) Member, 2 variety collector.

See my want page: http://goccf.com/t/140440
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 Posted 05/12/2022  12:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hokiefan_82 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting coin, and some great background and history about it. Thanks!
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 Posted 05/12/2022  10:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add HumblePie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This went well with my morning coffee. Thanks for posting!
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 Posted 05/12/2022  3:45 pm  Show Profile   Check westcoin's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add westcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Glad at least a few of you enjoy my ramblings and postings on some esoteric and strange items from early American coinage and history. I find it the most fascinating time to study and read about, though England through the ages is also pretty darn interesting too, as they have a lot more history than our young country, but being an American I am drawn more to our history.

I am slowly learning about England and the entire United Kingdom and (not so united at times). Primarily due to the actual coins and tokens cost a lot less money than the American colonial counterparts to collect. In fairness, with the American counterparts I can really only afford the books or to be a member of the various clubs and take advantage of their lending libraries, no way can I afford to collect the actual coinage anymore with today's market prices.
"Buy the Book Before You Buy the Coin" - Aaron R. Feldman - "And read it" - Me 2013!
ANA Life Member #3288 in good standing since 1982, Early American Coppers Member (EAC) #6202, Colonial Coin Collectors Club (C4), Conder Token Collector Club (CTCC), & Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS) Member, 2 variety collector.

See my want page: http://goccf.com/t/140440
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 Posted 05/12/2022  5:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for letting us share your keen interest in this topic.
IN NECESSARIIS UNITAS - IN DUBIIS LIBERTAS - IN OMNIBUS CARITAS
Highlights of my coin collection: https://coins.www.collectors-societ...aspx?s=31920
Help me optimize my photo setup: http://goccf.com/t/411871
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