Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

The Rarest Of The Rare What Is It

First page | Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 45 / Views: 2,800Next Topic
Page: of 3
Pillar of the Community
United States
2444 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  5:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jacrispies to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The 1814 platinum half dollar pattern is unique.

Oops, my mistake. Three platinum examples were struck in 1814.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
1280 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  6:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hokiefan_82 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One interesting one is the 1933 Saint-Gaudens double eagle, of which there are several in existence but only 1 that is legal to own...
My U.S. Type Set: https://www.NGCcoin.com/registry/co...sets/278808/
My U.S. Classic Commemorative Complete Set: https://www.NGCcoin.com/registry/co...sets/278741/
My 20th Century U.S. Type Set - Proofs only, No Gold https://www.ngccoin.com/registry/co...sets/396301/
Edited by hokiefan_82
08/02/2022 11:22 pm
Valued Member
United States
212 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  9:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Pmint1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Moderator
Learn More...
Australia
14811 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  9:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Logically, a coin with zero known surviving examples is even rarer than a coin with just one surviving example.

The 1964-D Peace dollar. 316,076 were struck, every single one of them was melted down again before they could be released. Not even the Smithsonian or the Mint kept a copy; the two they put aside in the Treasury vault were ordered destroyed in 1970. If any mint worker managed to smuggle one out, they've done a good job of hiding it for the past 60 years.

For a combination of rarity and value, outside of the United States, the "rarest coin" is probably the gold 1000 mohur coin, struck by Mughal emperor Jahangir (father of the guy who built the Taj Mahal) in 1613. The coin is 8 cm thick, 20 cm across, and weighs just under 12 kilograms of .917 fine gold. Original mintage: just one. It was lost and presumed destroyed for several hundred years, before turning up again back in 1987. It was last seen in 2008 in a Swiss auction house, with a $10,000,000 estimate attached to it. Mughal mint records show that two other 1000 mohur coins were struck in different years; these were given as gifts to foreign dignitaries and presumably melted down into something more practical shortly after the dignitaries arrived back home, as they have never been seen again.

The British Museum doesn't have any 1000 mohur coins in its collection; all they have is a brass copy of the much smaller 100 mohur.

The 1000 mohur coin would remain "the world's largest gold coin" until the Perth Mint and the Royal Canadian Mint got into a "who can make the biggest gold coin" war back in the early 2000s. The Perth Mint won that contest, with their 1-tonne gold kangaroo "coin" made in 2012, but that giant coin was later broken down again as nobody could afford to buy it. Second-place were the Canadians with their 100-kilogram maple leaf dated 2007, which had a mintage of 6; one was stolen by thieves and destroyed in 2017, leaving five survivors.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
United States
2547 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  9:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NumisEd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How about the 1870-CC $20 AU-58 that was stolen from a Brinks truck 10 years ago?
Pillar of the Community
United States
5467 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  11:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1964 Peace dollar would be my guess. While the official explanation is that all were melted no one actually counted them. I've spoken to people that heard rumors that several exist but since they are technically illegal to own one you would be really dumb to say you have one as the government would take it away. So in effect it is the rarest coin due to:
1) officially all are melted
2) if you actually owned one you couldn't talk about it
3) if the us govt knew you owned one, it would be considered stolen property and they would take it away.
4) you can't get it certified to prove 100% authenticity (so if you have one how can you prove it's real)
5) there are enough rumors around that there maybe a few out there but cant be proven (see above)

So while a few 1 coin samples are known of other years/denominations the 1964 Peace dollar is like Schroedingers cat of coins in that it exists and doesn't at the same time.
Edited by hfjacinto
08/02/2022 11:21 pm
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
1280 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  11:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hokiefan_82 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another coin sort of in a similar situation as the 1964 Peace dollar is the 1974 aluminum Lincoln cent. A dozen or so were unaccounted for, and I believe at least one was certified by PCGS but later returned to the Feds. So, there are likely a few out there, but since they're subject to confiscation they'll likely never surface.
My U.S. Type Set: https://www.NGCcoin.com/registry/co...sets/278808/
My U.S. Classic Commemorative Complete Set: https://www.NGCcoin.com/registry/co...sets/278741/
My 20th Century U.S. Type Set - Proofs only, No Gold https://www.ngccoin.com/registry/co...sets/396301/
Pillar of the Community
United States
2444 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2022  11:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jacrispies to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I wonder what floats around the coin black market. Coins that are illegal to own, but are desirable and bought by those who want them.
Valued Member
Canada
308 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2022  12:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add cdngmt to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nor can there be 2 different coins with the same certification number
Pillar of the Community
4628 Posts
 Posted 08/04/2022  01:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Princetane to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For Australia, any 1937 dated coin other than the Crown. 1930 Pattern pennies

New Zealand - Waitangi Crowns, but there were 3 failed patterns of them which are basically unique, one sold recently for $30k.

Rumours also abound about a 1959 strapless 6d, a 1985 50 cent coin with a Canadian dollar planchet reverse and 1940 Halfcrown with the standard Obverse.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
17752 Posts
 Posted 08/10/2022  01:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
the 1974 aluminum Lincoln cent. A dozen or so were unaccounted for, and I believe at least one was certified by PCGS but later returned to the Feds.

There are two known Philadelphia coins, one in the Smithsonian and a second coin that was certified by ICG as an AU-58 and then later certified by PCGS as MS-62. That coin is still in the hands of the family that submitted it. (Known as the Toven Specimen.) Although the Government maintains it belongs to them they have made no overt attempts to recover it. And probably won't unless it is put up for public sale.

There is one known 1974 D aluminum cent, a coin that has no reason to exist. It was certified by PCGS. It was going to be auctions with proceeds going to charity but the government objected and demanded its return. The auction house withdrew it and returned it to the consigner. Eventually the owner agreed to surrender it to the Government. I don't know if it was destroyed, is still being held, or sent to the Smithsonian.

Since PCGS has certified both of these "illegal to own" coins I would think they would probably certify a 1964 D Peace dollar as well if one was submitted to them.
Gary Schmidt
Edited by Conder101
08/10/2022 01:21 am
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
118370 Posts
 Posted 08/10/2022  10:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Since PCGS has certified both of these "illegal to own" coins I would think they would probably certify a 1964 D Peace dollar as well if one was submitted to them.
That is very interesting. If that were to happen, meaning it exists, then would the legality of the Carr over-strikes becomes a hot topic?
Pillar of the Community
United States
2547 Posts
 Posted 08/10/2022  6:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NumisEd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Why is the 1974 aluminum cent illegal to own?
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3775 Posts
 Posted 08/10/2022  10:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Yokozuna to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
NumisEd asked...
Quote:
Why is the 1974 aluminum cent illegal to own?

Because it was never issued for circulation and should have been destroyed once it was recalled by the Mint.

This is much like the 1933 $20 gold Double Eagle coins that were minted but never issued or the 1964-D Peace dollars that have been deemed Illegal to own and are subject to seizure by the Secret Service if they are found.

Thirty-six 1974-D aluminum cents were distributed among the House Banking and Currency Committee and the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee. Nine congressmen and four senators received examples, along with some Treasury officials. Additional specimens were given out by then Mint Director Mary Brooks.

Ultimately, the proposal for the aluminum cent was rejected in Congress, due mainly to the efforts of the copper-mining and vending machine industries, which felt the aluminum coins would jam machines and cause other problems.

More than 1.5 million aluminum cents were destroyed with two known surviving. Both of the coins known have been graded, with one getting an ICGC AU-58 that was then submitted and regraded by PCGS as a MS-62. The second coin was graded PCGS MS-63 ( https://www.PCGS.com/cert/28544237 ) with a price guide value of $250,000. It has been discussed that the true value would be $2,000,000 or more.

If a coin is struck but never issued, all examples are considered the property of the US Mint and cannot be legally owned by an individual.

@Conder101. I missed your reply! I was just trying to help NumisEd with his question. My reply is just a rehash of what you had already said and wasn't meant as a disagreement in any way. Sorry about that!

ANA ID: 3203813 - CONECA ID: N-5637

Clothes Dryers are the Coin's natural enemy. NEVER store your coin collection in a dryer. This has been a Yokozuna Public Service Announcement. dryer coin
Edited by Yokozuna
08/10/2022 10:16 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
5467 Posts
 Posted 08/10/2022  10:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Since PCGS has certified both of these "illegal to own" coins I would think they would probably certify a 1964 D Peace dollar as well if one was submitted to them.


Unlike the aluminum cents which were given out to various Congress people, the 1964 Peace dollar was never released. If any appeared the government can say it's stolen property and demand it's return.

Actually PCGS probably could certify it but you wouldn't get it back, as the 1964 Peace dollar would be considered stolen property, I believe that the TPG would be legally obligated to report it to the government if you certified it. And the government would take it from you. So for all practical purposes you couldn't get the 1964 Peace dollar certified. Think of the 9 33 gold double eagles, all were taken by the government, you would have to be willing to have your Peace dollar confiscated. So why take the risk. In the shadows of collecting there are lots of coins that don't exist being owned by collectors. If you have 1 I'm pretty certain you don't talk about it.

Just reading coin word there are lots of antique coins that shouldn't have left their native country appear for sale. If for example Italy demanded all its Roman era coins back and made a claim with US courts and they won, lots of ancient coins would no longer be allowed to be sold. Does that mean they would disappear? No but they wouldn't be allowed to be sold on public markets. Try to buy coins/currency from Cuba on eBay. There are none but they are available if you know where to look. Although technically any Cuban coin or note issued after 1962 is illegal to own in the US.
Edited by hfjacinto
08/10/2022 10:27 pm
Page: of 3 Previous TopicReplies: 45 / Views: 2,800Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.48 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: