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Large Cent Type Set (Question, And Progress So Far)

 
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 Posted 09/23/2022  12:59 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Adam590 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hello all, I am looking at my (very far from finished) large cent type set, and I have a question about how collectors usually do it. This is what I originally thought:

Chain Cent 1793 (won't happen for a long time)
Wreath Cent 1793 (this one I hope to get)
Flowing Hair/Liberty Cap Cent 1793-1796
Draped Bust Cent 1796-1807
Classic Head Cent 1808-1814
Coronet/Matron Head 1816-1839
Coronet/Braided Hair 1840-1857

I have since paid closer attention to the cents from 1837-1839, and the head keeps changing. The 1839 ones, with several varieties, of which I have the name that ten year me would have loved, Booby Head, look to be completely different than both the Braided Hair and Matron Head version, albeit much closer to the Braided Hair version. The 1837 ones also seem to be different--does this make the following list for the Coronet cents more correct?

Matron Head 1816-1836
Matron Head/Braided Hair Transition 1837-1838
Matron Head/Braided Hair Transition 1839
Braided Hair 1840-1857

Here is what I have so far. The 1812 Cent I want to keep because it is the first coin I ever purchased (at the age of 9, for 15 dollars), but I will try to get another better Classic Head cent--I may try to upgrade the Draped Bust one too, but getting the Flowing Hair/Liberty Cap will be my next priority. The 1839 Booby Head cent has subtle, yet stunning blue toning on the obverse that the true view pictures don't capture. It's gorgeous, though, and lustrous. The 1848 one, though, is by far the most gorgeous one!














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 Posted 09/23/2022  08:58 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very impressive set. The 1818 and 1839 issues stand out particularly.
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United States
387 Posts
 Posted 09/23/2022  12:04 pm  Show Profile   Check CarrsCoins's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add CarrsCoins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
there are sort of an endless pile of types if you really want to go deeper. hand made dies means the coins are all somewhat unique.

here are some off the top of my head. my list isn't exhaustive.

1793 has 2 major reverse styles (chain and wreath) and 3 head styles (chain, wreath with flowing hair, liberty cap). 1794 has 3 head styles (heads of 93, 94, and 95). 1795 has the jefferson head (not a mint product but its part of the set). there are different reverse designs for 1795, 1796 and 1797. draped bust cents have 2 different styles of hair.

there are a bunch of edge treatments that are pretty interesting but not generally collected as part of the type. there are vine and bar edges, lettered edges, reeded edges, gripped edges, plain edges and so on an so forth.

coronets have several different fonts and letter sizes. there is the 15 star obverse. century letters, medium letters, large letters. the head changes in 1835, and again in 1836, 37 and 39. you talk about 1839.

late dates have 2 head styles. 1839-1843 has the petite head and then they transition to the mature head.

there are more variations.

most people do - draped bust, classic, coronet, braided hair and call it a day. its how albums like the dansco 7070 have the set. they leave liberty cap and flowing hair variants off for scarcity and financial reasons.

if I were going to collect large cent type I think my list would look something like:
chain, wreath, liberty cap head of 94 with lettered edge, liberty cap head of 1795 with plain edge, draped bust, classic head, coronet, head of 35, head of 38, booby, silly, petite, and mature head.

you can have one large cent and cover the type or you can find yourself spending a lifetime tracking down every single variation.
i like large cents. I currently have >225 Sheldon varieties and >235 middle date Newcomb varieties.
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 Posted 09/23/2022  2:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Adam590 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, every, especially to CarrsCoins, for once again being a treasure trove of wonderful numismatic information. I probably won't go to crazy going for every variety now, but I may go for the 1837 where the head looks quite distinct from the 1839 varieties and the 1835 and earlier ones. After looking up all of the differences that CarrsCoins mentioned, I appreciate how fluid and dynamic these early American copper series are!

We will see which coins I come across the opportunity to acquire in the future! The 1818 and 1839 cents I have are MS(62) ( PCGS grade, not EAC grade, haha, which would probably a lot lower...). The 1848 one is a 63 with a green bean. When I eventually upgrade my Classic Head cent, I will aim for 1808 or 1811, and it will probably be VF. As for the Liberty Cap/Flowing Hair design I may go for a nice (relatively) common 1794. I probably won't differentiate the Liberty Cap and Draped Bust cents.
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 Posted 09/23/2022  2:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jfransch to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have always liked the 1818 with the full circle die crack, what a great coin.
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 Posted 09/24/2022  6:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add paralyse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Mark Klein @ EAC is the acknowledged expert on the 1839 issues and has quite literally written the book on them. Several new die varieties have been discovered in the past couple of years based on his research and that of other members. The "basic" 1839 types are the Head of 1838, the Silly Head, the Booby Head, and the Braided Hair (head of 1840)

1837 did have two different hairstyles

The 1798 coins have two types (Type 1 and Type 2 hair)

The 1794 coins can be Head of 1793, Head of 1794, Head of 1795

This is the case for a few other dates in the series
There are also small and large date varieties (1843, 1857), wide and narrow date varieties (1818, 1822)
There are large/medium/small letter varieties (1831 being a prominent date for such)

It depends on how basic, or how detailed, you want to make things.

The coins you've posted so far sure are great examples for a type set, though!

I personally cannot afford a Chain or Wreath cent but would love to have one (the other stoppers for me are 1794 Head of '93, 1799 and 1804, as they are for many people.)
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 Posted 09/24/2022  9:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I also own a mint state 1818 large cent. Both yours and mine survive in mint state because they likely come from the Randall Hoard. That provenance to me is the most interesting part of the coin. Here is my example:


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 Posted 09/25/2022  10:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Adam590 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, @Paralyse for the wealth of possibilities for me to consider. Thanks, @numismaticstudent for sharing yours. I like the coloring on yours a lot. I am also quite sure that mine is from the Randall hoard--I love it's odd and fortunate "commonness" in uncirculated condition--I even like the strange green toning on mine. It is a weird coin, certainly an affordable one, but one that I treasure.
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 Posted 09/25/2022  12:23 pm  Show Profile   Check CarrsCoins's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add CarrsCoins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
i also have an 1818 N-10!

the randall hoard was a pile of about 5000 unc large cents found in georgia shortly after the civil war. they were quite prevalent even into the 1990s, to the point where dealers would occasionally have "rolls" or bags of them available. I remember seeing them loose in piles similar to how people treat 90% silver. today they have been dispersed to the point where you mostly see them as individual coins.

here is mine



the randall hoard is the source of my favorite numismatic conspiracy theory. this is solidly in the unverifiable and probably untrue catagory but the theory goes:

The randall hoard are restrikes.

there is even some evidence to back that up.

no specific dates or locations for the discovery of the hoard were ever made public. late 1860s somewhere in georgia. in the dirt. near a train station.

Joseph Mickley was invovled in the public dissmenination of the randall hoard. this is the same guy who made the 1804 restrike and the 1823 restrike. this is also happening around the same time of those restrikes. Mickley had purchased a bulk lot of scrap metal from the mint. in that scrap were multiple uncanceled dies.

every single one of the varieties is in its terminal die state when included in the hoard. just one example of a later die state in circulated condition would go a long way to discrediting this theory.

the public at the time of the hoards discovery considered them to be restrikes. they didnt trade at face value.

so, probably no true, but fun to think about. given the collectibility of the 1804 and 1823 restrikes I think its likely that the coins might become more popular if this theory were proven.
i like large cents. I currently have >225 Sheldon varieties and >235 middle date Newcomb varieties.
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