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New Gallery Of Ancient Bronze Weaponry From Western Asia

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 Posted 12/30/2020  10:31 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting piece, Surgical tools 3000 years old wow. Always enjoy seeing your new pieces and reading your write ups.
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 Posted 12/30/2020  10:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, gents.
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 Posted 12/30/2020  4:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice Bob!....Cool photography too ....
Just out of curiosity how were these tanged heads attached to the shaft?
Was it drilled out or split?
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 Posted 12/30/2020  5:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Paul.


Quote:
...how were these tanged heads attached to the shaft?
Was it drilled out or split?


I believe the wood shafts were split, then tied after the head was inserted. I know this was the case with the spearheads, so I'm assuming it was a similar process with the arrowheads.

I find it interesting that the ends of some of the spearhead tangs were bent in what is sometimes referred to as a "rat tail." The design apparently prevented, or at least minimized, further splitting of the wood shafts upon hitting their targets, thus allowing the spears to be reused. Two rat-tail spearheads from my collection, and a diagram explaining the fabrication, below.




Edited by Bob L
12/30/2020 5:34 pm
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 Posted 12/30/2020  6:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting Thanks!...
It also makes you realise just how much time, ie man hours, that went into producing these arrows. Not just the head and shaft attachment but then you've also got the fletching and nock, no wonder they recollected after a battle. Not something you can 'knock up' in a few minutes...Also read that the ties were then waxed or tarred and also the shafts were probably soaked in water before assembly?

Again just out of interest do you think that weapons in general were continually manufactured on site when there was a battle?
Edited by Palouche
12/30/2020 6:20 pm
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 Posted 12/30/2020  7:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That would make sense, Paul. I also suspect there must have been lots of recycling of downed arrowheads and spearheads, perhaps for centuries. I used to collect socketed trilobe Parthian-type arrowheads (I keep a group shot in my Parthian gallery). Each time I would add a new one to that collection, I would think about the fact that it could probably be attached to a new, modern-day shaft and used anew. Of course the older, larger, and no doubt more brittle tanged arrowheads, from the more distant period I collect nowadays, would be useless today. But I would imagine that they would have remained usable for decades back then, given the right conditions. Perhaps some of them, like coins, passed from person to person, but via battlefield cleanups and grave robberies rather than commercial transactions.
Edited by Bob L
12/30/2020 7:10 pm
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 Posted 05/28/2021  9:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Time for an update.

Here's a Luristani dagger from about 1000 BC. It's in desperate need of some TLC - conservation, that is. It measures 36.8cm (14.5"). It's a particularly interesting type. The pommel is divided into two semicircular "ears." In describing this type in his Catalogue of the Ancient Persian Bronzes in the Ashmolean Museum, P. R. S. Moorey mentions that the "lower part of the hilt (is) cast in imitation of an inlaid flanged hilt complete with guard flanges." And, indeed, if you take a look at the first dagger I posted in this thread (page one), you'll see the guard flanges - the tabs - that would be bent over the wood or bone inlays, to hold them in place. You can see, on the left-most image below - in the part of the hilt that looks like a little hourglass - the cast faux flanges.
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 Posted 05/29/2021  04:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wonderful looking specimen Bob!.....

Quote:
It's in desperate need of some TLC - conservation, that is.

Really interested in what the conservation procedure would be for this type of artifact?

Lovely addition to your impressive collection!
ps....Great photo, allows you to zoom in and feel the surfaces...................Paul
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 Posted 05/29/2021  08:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Paul. I'll be reading up on it to figure out what formula/ingredients might be best (sodium carbonate? sodium sesquicarbonate?). It's not something I know about. But I do know that the small bottle of Verdi-Care that I own will play a part. That stuff has become a hot commodity.

It'll be a project for later in the summer. I have a lot on my plate for the time being.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  08:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Time for me to catch up on what is happening in the forum. Thanks for another most interesting post, Bob. Great photography as usual.

If it were not for the weapons and pottery that you post I would not know that such items existed. I do enjoy reading about the history of these artefacts, and learning about their manufacture too.

Recycling weaponry on the battlefield as mentioned in a previous post makes sense, as the amount of swords, spears and arrows that could be carried by an army would be finite. That is something else that I hadn't thought of before.

Keep them coming, Bob.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  08:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Jim. Good to see you back.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  09:09 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow Bob another lovely and interesting addition to your collection. How do you go about conserving the blade? Is it a matter of rubbing oil into it? The Japanese use Choji oil (oil of Cloves) on their blades.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  09:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Ron. I'll have to research and weigh the options. A lot of advice regarding conservation out there. A project (one of many) for this summer.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  09:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micha to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Bob, your collection is with on word AWESOME, so many amazing items!!!
Well done my friend!!
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 Posted 06/01/2021  09:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Micha.
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