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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 04/20/2021  5:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice little 'very old' silver pick up Jim
Still has good detail and I like the snaky tongue!
Edited by Palouche
04/20/2021 5:19 pm
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 Posted 04/20/2021  5:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Beautiful, full of detail!
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 Posted 04/24/2021  7:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cheers Paul and Erafjel. A few of these little coins have come up recently (mainly silver), and I was lucky enough to get a bid on a couple. This little coin from Abydos with the eagle's head unfortunately off-flan is one of them.

Though very little remains apart from a few barely noticeable walls, Abydos was an important and prosperous city throughout the centuries. To date no excavations have been made on the site.

Lying on the Asian shores of the Dardanelles, across the Gallipoli peninsula, Abydos was an ancient city and titular see of Troas. Situated at the narrowest part of the Hellespont, it controlled the passage and collected tolls from those crossing the strait, making the city very wealthy. Abydos became a Greek colony around the 7th century BC.

In 513 BC the Persian king Darius captured the city and collected high taxes. In 447 BC Abydos became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime League to stand against the Persians. During the Peloponnesian War between Athenians and Spartans, the Spartan commander Lysandros made Abydos a state-center of Sparta. During the times of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC it became a part of Macedonia. In the 3rd century BC it was controlled by the Kingdom of Pergamum, and then by the Romans in the 2nd century BC. During the Byzantine period the city became a Christian site until the arrival of the Turks in the 15th century.

Abydos gets a few mentions in history and in legend. In Homer's Iliad it was the place where Leander swam over to Sestus, to visit his mistress, Hero. Herodotus mentions the Persian king Xerxes building the bridge of boats around 480 BC, and crossing with his army to a promontory on the European side on his way to Greece. After crossing, the bridge of boats was torched so that there was no way back. Around 334 BC, Alexander the Great crossed here to pass into Anatolia during his campaign against the Persians.

Troas, Abydos. Obol. 480-450 BC.
Obverse: Eagle standing left; kylix above. Obverse Inscription: ABY. Reverse: Facing gorgoneion, tongue protruding, within incuse square. Silver. Diameter: 9 mm. Weight: 0.8 gr.
Reference: SNG Cop 4
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 Posted 04/28/2021  5:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cool little coin Jim!...I do look forward to your write ups as I always learn something new!
Love the Wallace Gorgon portrait!
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 Posted 04/29/2021  7:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Love the Wallace Gorgon portrait!

Indeed Paul!

There is an interesting back story to this little coin from Halikarnassos (Halikarnassus) in Caria. It was minted during the Hekatomnid Dynasty when it was part of the Persian Empire. Hecatomnus, who founded the dynasty had three sons, Mausolus, Idrieus and Pixodarus, all of whom succeeded him, and two daughters, Artemisia and Ada, who were married to their brothers Mausolus and Idrieus.

Various sites give different years for Hecatomnus taking the kingship, but the following would appear to be the correct succession time line:
Hecatomnus c 395-377 BC; Mausolus c 377-353 BC; Artemisia II c 353-351 BC; Idrieus c 351-344 BC; Ada c 344-340 BC; Pixodarus c 340-335 BC; Ada c 334-326 BC.


According to tradition, Dorian colonists from Troezen settled at Halikarnassos early in the Iron Age. After the Persian conquest in the 6th century BC, Halikarnassos was ruled by a Carian dynasty centred at Mylasa. By the 5th century BC, however, it had come under the cultural influence of Ionia to the north and no longer belonged to the Dorian Hexapolis. In 480 BC Queen Artemisia I, of Carian and Greek descent, personally led her forces on the side of the Persians at the battle of Salamis and was one of Xerxes' most trusted advisers. Halikarnassos again came under Persian control after the King's Peace of 386 BC.

In the 4th century BC Halikarnassos was a well fortified large city arranged in amphitheatre form around its natural harbour, and was enclosed by over 5 km of fortification walls . The city was laid out on a grid with major streets leading north from the harbour to the heights of the acropolis. The harbour was enclosed by moles and a canal led to a second, secret harbour which is believed to have been to the east of the main harbour.

Mausolus became satrap and king of Caria in 377 BC and was one of the most notable of the Carian rulers. He moved the capital of Caria from Mylasa to Halikarnassos on the north shore of the gulf of Kos, commenced a huge building programme, extended and strengthened the borders of Carian territory and began a program to Hellenize his subjects. After the death of Mausolus in 353 BC, his wife-sister, Artemisia II, completed his tomb and defeated the city of Rhodes.

An artist's impression of Mausolus' tomb seen at Worldhistory org.

Halikarnassos is most noted for the tomb of Mausolus (Mausoleum) which was enhanced by the leading Greek sculptors of the century and was considered one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. Halikarnassos was also the birthplace of Herodotus, the "Father of History" and the historian Dionysius.

When Alexander the Great entered Caria in 334 BC, the exiled Ada, who was in possession of the fortress of Alinda, surrendered the fortress to him. Halikarnassos was one of the few Anatolian cities to resist the advance of Alexander, and after taking Halicarnassus, he handed back the government of the whole of Caria to Ada. Ada, in turn, formally adopted Alexander as her son, ensuring that the rule of Caria passed unconditionally to him upon her eventual death.

Caria, Halikarnassos. Hemiobol. 400-340 BC
Obverse: Head of ram right. Reverse: Young male head right (Apollo?), Carian legend S-A across fields. Silver. Diameter: 7 mm. Weight: 0.5 gr.
Reference: SNG Kayhan 996; SNG Keckman 873; SNG Helsinki 873
Edited by Novicius
04/29/2021 7:31 pm
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 Posted 05/01/2021  9:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just getting caught up. Enjoyed the updates, Jim. Thanks.

Re: Abydos...

Quote:
To date no excavations have been made on the site.


Considering the history there, that's remarkable.
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 Posted 05/05/2021  12:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Considering the history there, that's remarkable.

It is indeed, Bob. Considering how important the city appears to have been it is very odd.


This is the smallest coin in the collection now at 5mm in diameter. The ram's head and lion's head are still discernible. How anyone could carry this size of coin around without loosing it is amazing. If dropped, it would probably never be found again, or until someone found it a couple of thousand years later. Here it is on a thumbnail for reference.

Caria uncertain mint. Tetartemorion. 4th century BC.
Obverse: Head of ram right. Reverse: Head of lion right. Silver. Diameter: 5 mm. Weight: 0.3 gr.
Reference: SNG Keckman 903; SNG Kayhan 988.
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 Posted 05/08/2021  09:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Amazingly tiny coin!

The Gallic animals keep creeping into my collection.

This one shows a wolf (she-wolf) and a lizard. The wolf is perhaps attacking the lizard. For the Celts, lizards, much like snakes, symbolized death and the Lowerworld. Wolves had a more wide ranging symbolism: Vigor, death, channels to divinities and other worlds. Like many other wild animals they could be humans in animal form (especially true for she-wolves).

I'm not sure about the symbolism of this coin. I would think the she-wolf represents life rather than death. It could be interpreted as illustrating a battle between life (the wolf) and death (the lizard). Pure speculation from my side, though.

Carnutes or Eburovices, 40-30 BC? Bronze, 3.96 g, 16.5 mm. Obverse inscription: PIXTIL. La Tour 7095-96, Delestrée 2466.



Like a previous coin of mine, this one belongs to a group of coins from the Carnutes/Eburovices tribes marked Pixtil[os], the meaning of which is unknown.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  12:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Your latest coin post sounds very interesting, erafjel, especially with it being another Gallic animal coin. Unfortunately the image doesn't appear to have come through.

Another Diobol from Miletos in Ionia, similar to the one on page 24. This time the lion is facing left with the head turned back to the right. There appears to be quite a few of these tiny silver coins appearing just now.

Ionia, Miletos. Diobol. 525-475 BC.
Obverse: Forepart of a lion left, head turned back to right. Reverse: Stellate pattern within incuse square. Silver. Diameter: 10 mm. Weight: 1.01 gr.
Reference: SNG Cop 948; SNG Kayhan 462-75
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 Posted 06/01/2021  1:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Gone indeed, odd . Well, here it is:

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 Posted 06/01/2021  2:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
X 2. Nice coins, gents.
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 Posted 06/01/2021  9:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cheers, Bob.

Very nice detail on this coin too, erafjel. The wolf and the lizard are well formed, and the idea of the life and death struggle is really interesting. Thanks for reposting the image.
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 Posted 06/02/2021  6:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jaymassive79 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

What an amazing thread!

Informative and some many amazing coins been shared!

I love how many animals were represented on Romam and ancient coins!

Here's my latest animal related Romam Follis Coin. I love the story behind the image.

In fact I'm considering focusing on coins bearing eagles for a bit.





Cheers Jay
Edited by jaymassive79
06/02/2021 6:06 pm
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 Posted 06/04/2021  9:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is a nice she-wolf with Romulus and Remus, and the back story is indeed interesting.

Collecting the animals can be very addictive though, as I know to my cost.

There are some really nice eagles out there, and you could make a neat collection with a few of them.

Good luck with the hunting,
Jim
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 Posted Yesterday   8:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, it's another Ephesos Bee/Stag bronze. Even though there are over 1,000 different varieties of the Bee/Stag coins, the only ones I've managed to bid on were around the 10 mm diameter size. This coin is 16 mm diameter, so I was happy to win it in a recent auction.

Ephesos - Ionia. 280-258 BC.
Obverse: Bee within laurel wreath, Ε-Φ either side. Reverse: Stag feeding right; quiver above. Bronze. Diameter: 16 mm. Weight: 3.61 gr.
Reference: SNG Cop 268-9 var.
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