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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 09/07/2020  5:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Indeed another nice coin and informative post. Missed this one during what was a very busy past week. Glad Paul's reply put it at the top of the forum again. Adramytteion/Adramyttium...not sure there's ever been a coin from there on this board before.
Edited by Bob L
09/07/2020 5:26 pm
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 Posted 09/07/2020  7:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Adramytteion was a place that I hadn't heard of either Paul. I have been fortunate recently that some unusual (to me) coins have come within my budget.

Thanks for the reply Bob. I hope that some of the members found it to be of interest.
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 Posted 09/07/2020  8:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Researching this coin from Cherronesos in Thrace has proved very interesting, as Chersonesos is Greek for "peninsula" and several cities used the name. The actual city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by the lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos.

Cherronesos, was a town of ancient Caria. It was a member of the Delian League since it appears in tribute records of Athens between 452/1 and 429/8 BC, paying a phoros of two to three talents. It is also mentioned in a tribute decree of Athens dated to 425/4 BC. Coins are preserved that have been dated around 500 BC, bearing the legend "ΧΕΡ", which is attributed to Cherronesos. The actual location of Cherronesos is unknown.

However, in an excellent article, Reid Goldsborough states:
These coins are sometimes described as being from Tauric Cherronesos or Tauric Chersonese, even by major auction houses, but this is a mistake. "Cherronesos" (also spelled "Cherronesus," "Chersonesos," "Chersonesus," and "Chersonese") is the Greek word for "peninsula," and there were no fewer than 28 geographical areas referred to in the ancient sources as "Cherronesos." Tauric Cherronesos, which is present-day Crimea, Ukraine, is the peninsula in the northern Black Sea on which the city of Pantikapaion/Panticapaeum was situated. Thracian Cherronesos, which today is called the Gallipoli peninsula and is part of Turkey, is the peninsula in the northeast Aegean Sea on which the cities of Kardia/Cardia and Lysimachia were situated. The spellings seen most commonly are "Cherronesos," "Chersonesos," and "Chersonese."

Earlier Thracian Cherronesos coins are broadly attributed to Thracian Cherronesos while later ones are attributed more specifically to Kardia/Cardia, those that include the name of this city in the inscription. Kardia was founded as a colony of Miletos in the late seventh century BC. Cherronesos hemidrachms may have been minted in Kardia or by a confederation of cities and towns within the peninsula Cherronesos.

The large number of varieties and the frequency of these coins on the market today indicate that Cherronesos hemidrachms were issued in great volume over a long period. They're thought to have been used in ancient times in support of trade with the cities along the coast of the Black Sea. Cherronesos was under the control of Athens from 560 BC to 338 BC, aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken over by Philip II in 338 BC, Pergamon in 189 BC, and Rome in 133 BC. The area was later controlled by Byzantium, then the Ottoman Turks.

Thracian Cherronesos issued bronze coins depicting a lion's head as well. The reverse features a wheat grain (sometimes referred to as corn) and the inscription XEP/PO, which is short for "Of the Cherronesians."

Thrace Cherronesos, 400 - 350 BC.
Obverse: Lion's head left. Reverse: XEP/PO above and below corn-grain. Bronze. Diameter: 11 mm. Weight: 1.13 gr. SNG Cop 845; Sear 1607.
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 Posted 09/12/2020  8:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The vendor's description for the reverse of this coin from Tarsos, was Heracles standing on a horned and winged lion. However similar coins on Wildwinds have some reverses described as Sandan standing on a horned and winged animal. It is now thought likely that the Lion of Saint Mark on the pillar in the Piazza San Marco in Venice, was in origin a winged lion-griffin from such a monument at Tarsos.

Tarsos (Tarsus) in Cilicia was first ruled by the Hittites. Tarsos is derived from the original Hittite name Tarsa, and it is believed that it was representative of the Pagan god Tarku. Assyria ruled next, and from 400 BC on Tarsos was the seat of a Persian satrapy, and the city's patron god was Sandan. Tarsos was largely influenced by the Greek language and culture, and as part of the Seleucid Empire became more and more hellenized.

The city was located at the mouth of the Cydnus River, and was the principal city of Cilicia. Incidentally Alexander the Great almost met his death here in 333 BC, after bathing in the Cydnus. Tarsos was also a cultural centre and seat of learning, having over 200,000 books in it's library, a huge number of them being scientific works. The schools in Tarsos were said to rival those of Athens and Alexandria.

In 171 BC there was a revolt against Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who had renamed the city Antiochia on the Cydnus (Antiochia ad Cydnum), to distinguish it from Syrian Antioch. There were many cities called Antioch, so the name didn't last long.

Cilicia, Tarsos, 2nd - 1st cent. BC.
Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right. Reverse: TARSE(ON) to right of Sandan/Heracles standing on horned and winged lion right, 2 monograms in left field. Bronze. Diameter: 15 mm. Weight: 3.54 gr. Sear 5668v. Lindgren III A911av.
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 Posted 09/13/2020  6:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Couple of nice additions Jim, and really enjoyed the write ups thanks.

Coinsidentally, I'd been looking at the same type 'Cherronesos' and will probably purchase it at the end of the month....

WOW...The Cilicia coin has a lot of variations as I've also seen it referenced as a goat... https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/lo...Default.aspx
Horned animal...
https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/nu...Default.aspx
Mythological beast...
https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/bi...Default.aspx
And horned lion right...
https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/dm...Default.aspx

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347 Posts
 Posted 09/13/2020  8:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Paul.

I have to admit that the animal looks more like a goat to me, than a lion, but it is probably down to the skill of the engraver.

It was not an easy coin to attribute, as every site gave a different description. All part of the fun though, and I did learn a lot about the history of the place.

Good luck with the Cherronesos coin.

Jim
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 Posted 09/15/2020  8:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another coin from Cyzikus (Kyzicos) in Mysia. I find these tiny coins fascinating and it's a three in one this time, with the head of a lion, the forepart of a boar, and a tunny fish.

Cyzicus was said to be founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly at the coming of the Argonauts, many colonies coming from Miletus in 756 BC. Cyzicus had a strategic location on the coast of the Propontis (Sea of Marmara), over the sea routes from Greece to the Black Sea, and became important around the end of the Peloponnesian War.

The Peloponnesian War lasted fom 431-404 BC and during that time Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. The naval Battle of Cyzicus took place in 410 BC, when an Athenian fleet routed and completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. Cyzicus was made over to Persia, as were other Greek cities, at the peace of Antalcidas in 387 BC. In 334 BC Alexander the Great captured Cyzicus from the Persians, later claiming responsibility for building the land bridge connecting the island to the mainland.

Cyzicus (Kyzikos), Mysia. AR Trihemiobol, c. 450-400 BC.
Obverse: Forepart of running boar left, tunny fish swimming upwards behind. Reverse: Head of roaring lion left, within shallow incuse square. Diameter: 11 mm. Weight: 1.10 gr. BMC Mysia, 112.
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 Posted 09/15/2020  8:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Super coin, Jim. Always liked this type.
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 Posted 09/16/2020  08:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thq to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's the type I tried to photograph novicius. I need a better camera.

The detail on these tiny coins is incredible. And for your money you get a lot of animals, both real and imaginary.

Regarding Cilicia and Tarsus, the passage in Xenophon's Anabasis describing the Cilician Gate interests me. It is a bottleneck on the road from Greece to Persia. The modern photos remind me of the Siskiyous on the OR/CA border.

https://www.livius.org/articles/pla...lician-gate/
"Two minutes ago I would have sold my chances for a tired dime." Fred Astaire
Edited by thq
09/16/2020 08:22 am
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 Posted 09/16/2020  09:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Super coin, Jim. Always liked this type.

It is a break away from the bronze theme Bob, as there doesn't seem to be an equivalent in bronze. An animal themed collection wouldn't be complete without at least one of these beautiful little coins.

Quote:
That's the type I tried to photograph novicius. I need a better camera.

All my images were taken on a very old Sony compact Cyber-Shot DSC-W35 @thq. I clamp it to an even older Krokus enlarger stand.

I've always been amazed at the amount of detail to be found on these tiny coins. The engravers were very skilled indeed.

Thank you for the link to the "Cilician Gate" article. I hadn't seen anything about it before, and it was very informative. It must have been a nightmare for a military commander, but shows the worth of Alexander's cavalry.

Jim
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 Posted 09/16/2020  10:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thq to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Anabasis is well worth reading. While Xenophon may have exaggerated some parts of the story, it was written in the place and the time of the coins that interest us. Many of the locations are unknown, particularly the battle of Cunaxa, but the Cilician Gate is well-known. The 10,000 Greek mercenaries were stranded in front of Babylon after the death of Cyrus and had to fight their way back across Asia Minor to get home. Great drama.
"Two minutes ago I would have sold my chances for a tired dime." Fred Astaire
Edited by thq
09/16/2020 10:39 am
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 Posted 09/16/2020  6:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The Anabasis is well worth reading.

I found an on-line translation by H. G. Dakyns and am looking forward to a good read.

I am wondering how many of the 10,000 mercenaries actually made it home?
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 Posted 09/18/2020  8:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This coin had been listed as GAUL, Massalia, after 200 BC. Turreted head of city right / Crouching lion right, ΜΑΣΣΑ above. After some research the coin turned out to be from Plakia in Mysia circa 350 BC.

Plakia (Placia) was a town of ancient Mysia on the coast of the Propontis at the foot of Mount Placus, east of Cyzicus, in a small region once called Cilicia (not the Cilicia in southern Anatolia). According to ancient sources, the settlement of the region dates back to the 13th century BC, was founded by Herakles after his sack of Troy and named after his birthplace, Thebes in Boeotia. Plakia was called Cilician Thebe in Homer's Iliad. It was a Pelasgian town, and according to Herodotus, they had preserved their ancient language down to his time.

At the time of the Trojan War, the people were known as the Cilicians, and ruled by King Eetion. Eetion's daughter Andromache was given in marriage to Hector, son of King Priam of Troy. The Achaians, led by Achilleus, sacked the city during the latter part of the war, killed King Eetion, his wife and his sons. They also carried off several women, including Chryseis, who became the concubine of Agamemnon. Chryseis' father attempted to ransom his daughter, Agamemnon refused, and the plot of Homer's Iliad was laid down.

Around 350 BC, when this coin would have been minted, the Ionians arrived in the area.

Plakia in Mysia, circa 350 B.C.
Obverse: Head of Kybele right, wearing turreted headdress, hair rolled. Reverse: ΠΛAKIA above lion right, devouring prey, ear of corn beneath. Bronze. Diameter: 12mm. Weight: 1.48 gms. Reference: Sear 3983, B.M.C.15.174,5
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 Posted 09/18/2020  8:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice rendition of the lion there, Jim. Some seriously old coins in your collection.
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 Posted 09/20/2020  8:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Some seriously old coins in your collection.

Thanks Bob, the collection does seem to be heading that way.

It is nice to see a dove, the symbol of peace, on the reverse of this scarce coin from Metropolis.

Metropolis was a town and city-state of Histiaeotis (or of Thessaliotis) in ancient Thessaly, described by Stephanus of Byzantium as a town in Upper Thessaly. It was located at the foot of a low spur of the Pindus Mountains, some 9 km South West of Karditsa, in the West Thessalian plain. It was formed from an amalgamation of towns into poleis, or city-states, and was one of the corners of the square formed by Trikka, Metropolis, Pelinna, and Gomphoi.

It is first heard of in the 4th century BC, and issued coinage c 400 to 344 BC and again c 300 to 200 BC. Its outlying farms were attacked in 198 BC by the Aitolians when it was under Macedonian control, and in the same year it surrendered to Rome. It seems to have been prosperous and an important member of the post 196 BC Thessalian League.

Thessaly, Metropolis, 325 - 275 BC. AE Chalkous,
Obverse: Young male head to right, with short hair. Reverse: ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ from above to right; below, dove with wreath in beak, landing to right.
BCD 480.12. Ex-BCD Collection.
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