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Official "Post A Counterstamp" Thread....

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Pillar of the Community
United States
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 Posted 02/06/2020  3:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@ironhorse .... That's an intriguing pair of counterstamps you've unearthed! Doing a cursory Google search, I found mention of a Peter Plunket living on the Upper Penisular in Canada, circa 1835-37. The BBS c/s, set within a heart, just might be the hallmark of an early tinsmith, silversmith, pewterer or the like. Neither of these was listed by Brunk.
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Canada
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 Posted 02/06/2020  4:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Exoguy
thank you for that info, I'll add it to my research
other than Brunk I just have to get lucky with little bits of info I can pick up along the way, beyond that it's tough to any history on some
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Canada
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 Posted 02/12/2020  08:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
here we are again with a couple of question mark counterstamps

I've found nothing on these information-wise...I'm chalking them both up as mavericks, both were found separately from one another at early colonial sites in maritime Canada




this was my very first one! this began my interest in c/s

looks like A M K with the right upright of the M creating the back of the K
copper alloy 28 mm diameter and just under 2mm thick 6.94 grams uniface





this one is a chunkier piece of change...
H. P.
a biggie...28mm diameter and greater than 2mm thick
weighs in at a whopping 11.2 grams copper alloy and uniface

Just putting these up to share...as always any info welcome

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 Posted 02/21/2020  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
this is it... the final c/s of the group of mavericks I've been posting lately...the omega if you will lol




funny looking stamp here, closest I could call this one would be an omega ; I'll leave the door open to interpretation

copper alloy 5.19 g 22mm diameter and less than 2mm thick uniface

I'll be on the hunt again soon so I'm hoping another counterstamp shows up this year to share with you all
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 Posted 02/21/2020  4:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
this is it... the final c/s of the group of mavericks I've been posting lately...the omega if you will lol
Well played!
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 Posted 02/22/2020  03:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Omega c/s is "Greek" to me ....

Seriously though, I've not run across the like of it in my travels. The only way pieces like this have a chance of attribution is if a matching stamp appears on another coin in conjunction with another known or attributable c/s. The "needle in a haystack" principle applies to mavericks like this Omega piece.
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Canada
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 Posted 02/25/2020  2:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
on my searches for 'omega' related to coins etc ...I got led off track by 'Omega man gold coins'
a neat story by a clever counterfeiter...we can pick up some pretty cool info along the way that might not be related to our current research but it ends up being just as valuable..I know I'll look closer at gold coins now
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United States
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 Posted 02/26/2020  9:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So I don't know how to quote another post.
Anyways the coin that has the Omega stamp in it... it's not omega it's a script letter C.
I hope this helps
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 Posted 02/27/2020  12:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the CCF ....


Quote:
it's not omega it's a script letter C.


IMHO, I beg to differ. Google "omega symbol" in quotation marks, and look at the images. Given over four decades of collecting counterstamps, I've yet to see a "C" that looked like an omega symbol. Here are close-up pics of the "omega coin."




Here's a pair of counterstamped Half Cents that illustrate a capital "C" (note the single serif, not double serif as on the omega symbol) ....


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 Posted 02/27/2020  09:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So I have been doing calligraphy for many years. There are hundreds even thousands of variations of the letter "C". But there is only one omega symbol. You should be able to draw a line down the center (12 o'clock to 6 o'clock) and have both sides identical. &Omega
The only time you might see it look differently would be something that would be an abstract piece of art.

Notice the red circles and how each one is a has a different width. Also in the bottom circle kinda kicks out a little. That is one identifying feature of a "C" in calligraphy. Have you ever seen really fancy old English style calligraphy? have you ever had a difficulty identifying exactly what the letter is? Looking where the bottom red circle is can help you narrow down what it is either a "C" but sometimes a "G". In this case it could be a "G" but I don't believe it is. Secondly the green circles these are obviously different on either side. You will never see that with Omega. Granted you may have never seen a "C" like that in all of your experience. But you will never see the omega symbol like that..
Lastly all the symbols in the Greek alphabet are mirror images either on the y or the x axis except for 4 of them. 2 of those are inverted the other 2 have no axial symmetry. So whether or not it's a "C" is most definitely not omega.


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 Posted 02/27/2020  10:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I see what you're saying. If there were other letters present, forming a word, I would wholeheartedly concur with your assessment. I've studied thousands of counterstamps over forty years now and have yet to see a letter "C" shaped in this manner. I will admit this could be a first time, but I seriously doubt same.

Bear in mind that this punchmark was most likely stamped 150 years ago; perhaps, much longer. There were typically few standards practiced back then. Stamps were often crudely designed by blacksmiths and others who paid little, if any, attention to detail. For all we know, the maker of this mark, be it a letter "C" or an omega symbol, could have intended it to be a horseshoe!

Just for fun, here's a well-fashioned horseshoe that Daniel Wigg, a late 1800's blacksmith, used as his trademark for horse linament. Daniel had a shop in Hyde Park, NT, along the Hudson River. He serviced the Roosevelt family, back then.



When it comes to judging counterstamps, it's often difficult to gauge a maker's intent. There tend to be more unanswered questions than answered ones. This mark may have been a malformed "C" perhaps? For now, my best guess remains a stand-alone omega symbol.

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Canada
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 Posted 02/27/2020  12:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
And here I thought this one was another one to put back to sleep for a few more years lol
I looked at the c/s many times...I saw a "C" and a "G" but decided on omega. I'm happy with any thing anyone has to say about any of my coins good bad or otherwise
I learned more about Greek letters than I did before and that's progress...the right direction for sure.

Thanks again to the community...great job guys!
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United States
6 Posts
 Posted 02/27/2020  12:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@ExoGuy
So I'm guessing that you have done a lot of research looking for Omega. I would suggest searching for "C" and "G". I honestly don't know really anything about counter stamps. But I do know lettering and I know symmetry was incredibly important when creating the Greek alphabet. There is no way it's Omega.


**Please don't take this personally or offense to this next statement.**
I'm always hesitant wouldn't asking questions on community forums. The knowledge found on these forms is incalculable. But I've noticed that sometimes experts get stuck in a way of thinking that they dismiss thoughts from a novice. I am no expert. But consider that the reason you have not found anything about a Omega counterstamped is because it's not Ω
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