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 Posted 03/06/2014  9:05 pm Show Profile   Check VisigothKing's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add VisigothKing to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I thought this might make for a good and interesting thread: to post coins of two or more rulers/important figures that were enemies of one another, and to inform why they were hostile towards each other.

Justinian, Byzantine Emperor VS Totila, Ostrogothic King

During the course of the Roman reconquest of Italy in the 6th century AD, known as the Gothic War, Justinian's legions faced off against the forces of a succession of Ostrogothic kings trying to defend their adopted homeland. But the Gothic leader that gave the hardest time for the Byzantine emperor bent on restoring Rome's old territories was Totila.

At the time of his ascension to the throne, Totila (whose original name was Baduila) had been the garrison commander of Treviso and had inherited an Ostrogothic realm confined to northern Italy, a realm that was shrinking fast. Marching out of the north with the small Ostrogoth army, Totila came upon a larger Roman force at Faventia and destroyed it, enabling him to move further south. As part of his strategy, Totila skipped over the fortified cities and took control of the countryside, and soon had nearly the whole of the peninsula back in Gothic hands. Totila's successes and the lack of cooperation between the emperor and his best general Belisarius helped to extend the conflict for another decade. He even managed to take Rome twice, the second time holding it for two years from 550-552 AD.

By this point, Justinian had had enough, and sent a great force of 35,000 under the general Narses to Italy. The main Ostrogothic army was soon defeated, and Totila killed. His successor Teia died in battle not long afterwards, and Justinian was left as the new master of the old Roman heartland.

Justinian I (ruled 527-565 AD)
AE Follis (40 nummi)
Obv: helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield, cross to right
Rev: Large M, ANNO to left, regnal year XIII to right, cross above, officina letter B below
CON in ex, Constantinople mint, struck 541 AD
Ref: SB 163
40.4 mm, 21.70 gr.




Baduila (Totila)
(ruled 541-552 AD)
AE Decanummium
Obv: DN BADV-ILA REX, crowned, draped, bust facing
Rev: DN B/ADV/ELA/REX in four lines within wreath
Rome mint, struck 550-552 AD
Ref: MIB 89a,
Very rare

"For as long as Belisarius lives, it is impossible for him to relinquish this city." - Roman general Belisarius, responding to a group of Gothic envoys, during the Gothic siege of Rome in 537 AD

Attributed coins in my collection so far - Roman: 241, Byzantine: 44, Post-Roman Germanic: 24
Edited by VisigothKing
03/06/2014 9:07 pm
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 Posted 03/06/2014  9:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chrsmat71 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
how about the "frienemies" licinius I and costantine I...










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 Posted 03/06/2014  9:55 pm  Show Profile   Check VisigothKing's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add VisigothKing to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lol I think you described them perfectly Chrsmat. And nice coins!
"For as long as Belisarius lives, it is impossible for him to relinquish this city." - Roman general Belisarius, responding to a group of Gothic envoys, during the Gothic siege of Rome in 537 AD

Attributed coins in my collection so far - Roman: 241, Byzantine: 44, Post-Roman Germanic: 24
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 Posted 03/06/2014  9:55 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is a very interesting thread, I've never heard of Totila I really need to brush up on my earlier Byzantine history.

Here are two of mine the first is Constantine I and the second is Maxentius. We all know the history about the epic battle between Constantine and Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge in 312 AD. Where Constantine prior to the battle envisioned a sign of the Chi-Rho and saw the words IN HOC SIGNO VINCES (With this sign you will conquer). Maxentius was defeated and Constantine became the soul ruler of the Roman Empire. An from that time on the Christian region was adopted as the state region.















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 Posted 03/06/2014  11:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chuy1530 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here are two folks that didn't like eachother, and with them it was very, very personal. Caracalla versus Geta.


A nice sized bronze coin of Caracalla, minted in Nikopolis ad Istrum between 198-201 AD. 27.3 mm, 10.4 g.


Silver denarius of Geta minted in Rome between 200-202 AD. 19.03 g, 3.29 g.

Geta and Caracalla were brothers, and sons of the emperor Septimius Severus. There was trouble from the beginning, when their father chose to raise Caracalla to the rank of Augustus in 198, but not his (one year younger) brother. Their mother Julia Domna, however, favored the younger Geta and convinced Septimius to elevate him as well in 209. In 211 Septimius died, making the brothers co-rules. They immediately began to feud, literally dividing the imperial palace in half and blocking off the two halfs from each other.

Caracalla made at least one attempt on Geta's life, spooking him away from meeting with his brother until their mother convinced them to meet without any soldiers and try to settle their differences. Well, convinced Geta to meet without any soldiers and try to setting their differences. Caracalla took it as an opportunity. While Geta, Caracalla and their mother were meeting Caracalla had his soldiers storm in. Julia took her son Geta into her arms but it did not stop the guards, and they killed him there, while a horrified Julia watched. Within a year of their father dying Geta was dead as well.

Caracalla officially damned Geta's memory, and went as far as to have his image erased from paintings and his name stricken from inscriptions. He also killed some thousands of suspected Geta supporters. Relations with his mother were understandably strained, although they reconciled at least officially. Caracalla would rule for 6 more years, before being stabbed to death while peeing on the side of the road while campaigning with an army in Persia.
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 Posted 03/07/2014  11:02 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Come on folks, there has got to be more coins out there. Lets keep this interesting thread going.
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 Posted 03/07/2014  12:21 pm  Show Profile   Check VisigothKing's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add VisigothKing to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'll post another pair myself soon.
"For as long as Belisarius lives, it is impossible for him to relinquish this city." - Roman general Belisarius, responding to a group of Gothic envoys, during the Gothic siege of Rome in 537 AD

Attributed coins in my collection so far - Roman: 241, Byzantine: 44, Post-Roman Germanic: 24
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 Posted 03/10/2014  11:08 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is a little bit of a twist on this very interesting thread.

The first coin is not a coin but a token. This is related to the war between the Byzantine empire and the Persians. In 614 AD the Persians conquered Jerusalem from the Byzantine empire. The Persians took treasures from Jerusalem among these treasures was the True Cross of Jesus Christ. For fourteen years they held the city. In 628 the Byzantine emperor Heraclius defeated the Persian King Khusro II and return it's treasures back to Jerusalem including the Tree Cross. To commutate this the emperor had a small piece of wood from the cross burnt and mixed with clay to make a token to give to pilgrims making the journey to Jerusalem.







True Cross Token





Khurso II
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 Posted 03/10/2014  6:30 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
253 views and only 7 replies. How about some of you lurkers out there signing up and posting something?
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 Posted 03/10/2014  9:53 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chrsmat71 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
here's another...

heraclius and heraclius constantine...







who revolted against and deposed (and executed) phocas...






who overthrew and executed maurice tiberius..





three more steps and we should be able to get to this guy...

Edited by chrsmat71
03/10/2014 9:54 pm
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 Posted 03/10/2014  10:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chuy1530 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This one doesn't have as much of a compelling narrative but regecidal child murder counts for something, right?



Meet the ruler of the Seleucid Kingdom in 142 BC, Antiochus VI Dionysus. He had ruled for a very personally eventual 6 years, during which he'd presumably taken his first steps, said his first words, started eating solid foods... I should probably mention at this point that he was an infant when he was declared king.



Meet the general of the Seleucid army at the time of Antiochus VI's ascension, Diodotus Tryphon. After Antiochus' father's death Diodotus supported making the infant Antiochus king. He more or less ruled in the child's place until Antiochus turned 6, at which time the boy was suddenly sent for an emergency surgery that he, uh, totally died during. And since, you know, Diodotus has been doing all the king stuff anyway, let's just make him king, right? Right guys? Yeah, huge tragedy what happened to the kid, but he'll take that crown now if nobody minds...

(Yeah he killed him.)

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 Posted 09/17/2014  6:39 pm  Show Profile   Check VisigothKing's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add VisigothKing to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
(Was looking for another topic when I stumbled on this old thread of mine, and I thought it was interesting enough to give it another breath of life.)


Theodosius II VS Johannes


In 423 AD, the emperor in the western half of the Roman Empire, Honorius, died after a lackluster reign that saw the city of Rome's first sack in eight centuries. Honorius left no kin to succeed him and continue the Theodosian dynasty in the west. Honorius's nephew and Eastern Roman emperor, Theodosius II, now nominally the emperor of both halves of the empire, was now required to appoint the new western ruler. But during the interregnum, Honorius's patrician, Castinus, acted first and placed on the throne the primicerius notariorum (senior civil servent) Johannes, who was publicly declared emperor at Rome. Johannes knew that Theodosius would not take kindly to this usurpation, and parts of his own empire such as Gaul and Africa openly rebelled against his rule. He prepared for war with the Eastern Roman Empire but at the same time tried to find a diplomatic solution to the situation. Theodosius did not budge, and proclaimed his young cousin Valentinian (in exile in Constantinople with his mother Galla Placidia) as Caesar, then later, Augustus of the west. War was inevitable.

Johannes probably knew that he would be defeated with the few forces available to him, so in 424 AD he sent one of his most loyal followers, the young officer Flavius Aetius, on a mission to recruit an army among the Huns (a people Aetius was very familiar with, having lived among them for a number of years) to aid in Italy's defense.

While Aetius was away, the eastern army began its attack on Italy, capturing Aquileia, and later, the usurper himself at his capital of Ravenna in 425 AD. Johannes was sent to Aquileia. No mercy was shown to him; they cut off his hand, then placed him on a donkey that carried him around in the hippodrome (where horse and chariot races were held) where he was subjected to humiliation by the city's citizens, and finally was beheaded. Aetius and his army of Huns arrived in Italy just three days after Johannes's death.

With Aetius still a threat, Galla Placidia entered into negotiations with the officer, and secured his loyalty (albeit grudgingly) and the disbandment of his Hunnic army, by making Aetius the Magister Militum of the west ("master of soldiers", the head general of the army).


Theodosius II, Eastern Roman Empire
AE Nummus
Obv: DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: Cross within wreath
Mint: Nicomedia, Mintmark: SMNA(or B) (struck 425-435 AD)
Ref: RIC X 447





Johannes (usurper), Western Roman Empire

AE Nummus
Obv: DN IOHANN-ES PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped bust right
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory holding trophy and dragging captive, Chi-Rho to left
Mint: Rome, Mintmark: RM (struck 423-425 AD)
Ref: RIC X 1913

"For as long as Belisarius lives, it is impossible for him to relinquish this city." - Roman general Belisarius, responding to a group of Gothic envoys, during the Gothic siege of Rome in 537 AD

Attributed coins in my collection so far - Roman: 241, Byzantine: 44, Post-Roman Germanic: 24
Edited by VisigothKing
09/17/2014 6:53 pm
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 Posted 09/17/2014  9:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chrsmat71 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
i remember this thread...it was a good idea. here are a couple cruddy lrb coin I cleaned up a while back.





left constans and right constantius ii, both siscia mint.
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 Posted 09/17/2014  9:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chrsmat71 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
i'll throw this one in as well, with the previous two...



delmatius, also from siscia
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