Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

A collection of what we love in numismatic history

 
Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 50
Valued Member
United States
402 Posts
 Posted 01/13/2017  7:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NoPoMoCo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you numinsmatic_(sic) student aka CoinNerd, your images are priceless!
Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/13/2017  7:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Glad you are enjoying the thread NoPoMoCo.

These are over 3,000 mint sewn bags of Morgan dollars, each containing 1,000 coins released from a Treasury vault in 1963.

Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
8676 Posts
 Posted 01/13/2017  7:53 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great thread and lots of interesting pics! I was unaware that


Quote:
John Quincy Adams was the only U.S. President known to have been a serious collector of coins.
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/13/2017  8:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Lady Clerks Leaving the Treasury Department at Washington
This illustration was published February 18, 1865, in Harper's Weekly.

THE FIRST TREASURY GIRLS
by Claudia Swain

Of all the Union government departments during the Civil War, the Treasury in particular was working overtime. In 1862, Congress passed the first Legal Tender Act, which gave the federal government the authority to issue currency. But with so many men off to war, who would make the money? No surprise, turns out women can do that kind of thing, too.

Treasurer Frances E. Spinner took a note from the US Patent Office (which had a few female clerks) when he decided in 1862 to hire Jennie Douglas to trim money. Although we'd like to say she was a Washingtonian born and bred, Ms. Douglas was from New York, Spinner's own home state. Bills at this time were printed four to a page and individual workers cut them out by hand. Spinner reasoned that women were naturally good with scissors, and only needed to be paid half as much to boot. Spinner was pleased with Douglas's first day, remarking that she "settled the matter in her behalf and in woman's favor."[1]

With such success, Spinner set about hiring more women to trim money, and more to count the money besides. With fast fingers and a head for numbers, a single clerk counted as many 50,000 bills in a day. Over the course of the war, over 400 women would work for the Treasury department, including in the office of Secretary Salmon P. Chase. They worked from 9AM to 3PM with 30 minutes for lunch. And they weren't the only "government girls" in Washington. Also in 1862, the War department and the quartermaster general's office hired a number of female clerks and copyists. Through Spinner's example, it was understood that women would do the same work for much, much less pay.

In fact, the government girls made $600 per year, while men doing the same job made from $1,200 to $1,800 per year doing the same work. In 1864, Congress actually passed a law stating that female federal clerks were not allowed to be paid more than $600.[2] By the end of the war the ceiling had been raised to $720, but that's hardly an improvement. It wouldn't be until 1870 that Congress passed a law allowing women to be paid equal to men, but as can be imagined, few if any actually did provide equal pay.

Another downside to being a government girl was the public outcry about possible immoral behavior resulting from men and women working in the same office. One tax collector from Kalamazoo even went so far as to declare "I do not think the service of females could be made efficient in the collecting department or be brought within the range of propriety." The avoid impropriety, the administration established separate rooms and work spaces for female workers. In 1864, however, a minor scandal arose when an affair was alleged as having taken place in the Treasury. No less than a Congressional investigation proved these rumors to be false, however.

Women in government had their champions, however. The assessor of Manchester wrote "female clerks are more attentive, diligent, and efficient than males and make better clerks. I intend very soon to have none but females in my office." And Spinner, credited today with making the first federal push to hire women on a large scale, said his female workers were "hardworking, efficient, [and] had excellent work habits and integrity."[3]

Many Treasury girls, like Jennie Douglas, were also from New York such as Helen L. McLean Kimball, a Civil War widow who was hired in 1863 and eventually rose to be chief of the Treasury Library. She was known for never missing a day of work and was celebrated in 1910, at age 90, for being the oldest women clerk employed by the government.[4]

Another, Mrs. Willard A. Leonard, was born in Pennsylvania; Like Mrs. Kimball, she decided to try for a Government position after her husband was killed in the Civil War. Hired in 1864, Leonard started out as a trimmer and later moved to the 'redemption division.' In this position, Leonard was responsible for sorting out counterfeit dollars from real ones. The stakes for a clerk in this position were high, should she mark as real a fake bill, the amount of that bill would come out of her own pocket, whether $1 or $1,000. Leonard's skill was unmatched, however, and she ended her career as the chief counterfeit detector, known as the "female Sherlock Holmes."[5]

By the 1870s, Treasury girls, and other government girls too, theoretically had equal pay and were generally well accepted. The women who worked in the Treasury had shifted from war widows to ladies "equal with or above angels" and "descended direct from Senators and Cabinet members of the old regime."[6] The Treasury department, and gradually other departments, hired more and more women as the 19th century waned, continuing into the 20th and 21st centuries; female clerks are still waiting on that equal pay, though.
Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/13/2017  8:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  12:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A cartoon from the April 9, 1870 issue of Harper's Weekly which anticipates the resumption of government payments in precious-metal coins.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speci...sumption_Act

Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  1:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Check drawn on January 6, 1792 on the First Bank of the United States, established by Alexander Hamilton, for $1,550, a staggering sum of money by John Jacob Astor, once the wealthiest man in the United States.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  1:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
After the Revolutionary War, the U.S. was about $80 Million in debt. The fiscally responsible policies of Jefferson and his Virginia constituents ensured that their War debt was soon paid off. The Northern States were still heavily in debt and Hamilton's plan for the federal finances of the young nation redistributed the burden of the debt, owed mostly by the North, to all the States. Below is a $2,000 note redeemable for Spanish milled silver redeemable on December of 1794. That was the same year that the first U.S. silver dollars were produced. Also note the harsh punishment for counterfeiting the instrument.

Edited by numismatic student
01/14/2017 1:31 pm
Bedrock of the Community
10197 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  1:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Crazyb0 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you Numismatic student for an excellent thread. Just finished reading, took two times, my head is swimming! Wow, what got me into collecting older world coins was their bacstories. Now you got me taking another look at our own, particularly the 1800's I have. My oldest is a worn 1773 Virginia half penny, wonder if any of the founders handled it back in their day. I'd post a pic but laptop screen died last night, all my pics on HD & not backed up. Tablet not setup to take good pix.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  2:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Glad you are enjoying it. Hope you get your computer going again. I lost a HD too a little while ago.

The 1893 Columbian Exposition provided a showcase for the new cutting edge technologies being employed at the U.S. Mint and Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Those exhibits have been restored and are on display in Washington.


Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  3:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  3:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
CoinNews.net - First United States Mint Coining Press. This is the original coining press from the first United States Mint; it was used to strike our nation's first coins. Coin production was not an easy task in Colonial Philadelphia. Working 11 hour days, it took coiners at the first Mint three years to strike one million coins. (Today, it takes about 30 minutes). This press was built by Adam Eckfeldt, a die sinker and mechanic at the first Mint. Eckfeldt became the Chief Coiner of the United States in 1814. At that prestigious post, Eckfeldt collected samples of United States and foreign coins and medals. The collection, known as the Coin Cabinet, later became the foundation of the National Numismatic Collection.

Do you recognize the painting above it? Yes it is the Dunsmore painting.

Edited by numismatic student
01/14/2017 3:46 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  4:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sahara Coins and Precious Metals has a special item in their waiting room. A Victor gold specie safe from the Carson City Mint. It is SPECTACULAR.


Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  5:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Modern gold planchets ready to be struck.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5811 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  5:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Page: of 50 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.76 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05