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 Posted 06/23/2018  9:36 pm  Show Profile   Check Errors and Varietys's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Errors and Varietys to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting and very informative! Thank you for sharing! I love learning about history!
Errors and Varietys.
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 Posted 06/24/2018  12:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Another shot of the San Francisco Branch Mint in 1906 shortly after the earthquake. Interesting shot of a heavy duty horse drawn wagon that evokes what today's tractor trailers look like today. Automobiles would soon take over and this was probably the last hurrah of teams of horses for transportation.
Looks rather serene.
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 Posted 06/24/2018  12:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks

This is an 1896 letter by the Secret Service Division of the Treasury describing thefts of bullion at the Carson City Mint in 1893. Specifically it alleges that some coin melts were bogus.


Edited by numismatic student
06/24/2018 12:02 pm
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 Posted 06/25/2018  1:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
This is an 1896 letter by the Secret Service Division of the Treasury describing thefts of bullion at the Carson City Mint in 1893. Specifically it alleges that some coin melts were bogus.
Very interesting.
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 Posted 06/25/2018  10:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
To Treasury Secretary, Ohio Governor and Supreme Court Justice Salmon P. Chase. Aspired to the Presidency but never got there.


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 Posted 06/26/2018  01:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Andrew Jackson's Presidential Appointment of U.S. Mint Director Robert M. Patterson.



Born to Robert Patterson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the U.S. Mint from 1805 to 1824, Robert M. Patterson [the son] received an M.D. in 1808 and then journeyed to work in Europe. In 1811 he traveled to England and studied with the famed chemist Humphry Davy. Returning to the United States in 1812, the younger Patterson was appointed a professor of natural philosophy (science) and vice provost at the University of Pennsylvania. Patterson remained at Penn until 1828 when he joined the faculty of the University of Virginia, where he worked closely with James Madison. At the invitation of President Andrew Jackson, perhaps on Madison’s recommendation, he returned to Philadelphia to become Director of the U.S. Mint, thus following in his father’s footsteps. Patterson was also president of the American Philosophical Society. He retired as Director of the Mint in 1851. Between Patterson father and son, and excepting only 11 years, they were Directors of the U.S. Mint from 1806-1851, an unparalleled achievement.

Patterson’s post as Director of the Mint was a great national trust, the same trust as his father had received from President Jefferson. The Directorship required an incumbent from the ranks of science, one conversant with the standards and relative values of metallic money, the appropriate metals of circulating mediums, and laws of coinage. Patterson digested and consolidated a code of Mint laws that was then approved by Congress, and superintended the main Mint and its branches with admirable efficiency. By the end of his term the Mint had an annual coinage, in gold alone, of over $50 million. Patterson’s stewardship of the Mint met with universal approval.
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 Posted 06/27/2018  8:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
U.S. Mint Call for Coin Designs 1853.

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 Posted 06/30/2018  8:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excited to find a copy of a payroll listing the employees of the U.S. Mint with what they earned on October 10, 1795.

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 Posted 07/01/2018  12:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is very interesting. A dollar went a long way back then.
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 Posted 07/01/2018  01:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Have you noted that there are two women on the payroll? Sarah Waldrake and Rachel Summers were the lowest paid employees on the payroll at the U.S. Mint. Each earned 50 cents a day as adjusters, which was less than the 65 cents that John Bay, the boy, made. In fact, Boy was his title at the Mint.

As adjusters, Ms. Waldrake and Ms. Summers earned less than Henry Voight, Jr. (apparently the son of the Chief Coiner) who made 88 cents a day and Lewis Bitting and Lawrence Ford who shared the same adjuster title and made $1.20 a day. I wonder if the ladies did less work than the men who shared that title...

Edited by numismatic student
07/01/2018 02:07 am
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 Posted 07/01/2018  2:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ironic that in this day of prolific Chinese forgeries that the term "die forger" is used in a legit manner in that list.
- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
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 Posted 07/02/2018  11:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Have you noted that there are two women on the payroll? ... I wonder if the ladies did less work than the men who shared that title...
I guarantee you they probably did as much if not more. Nothing has changed since then.
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 Posted 07/06/2018  12:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hopefully women will make further strides...
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