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A collection of what we love in numismatic history

 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  5:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Adjustment of coinage recurs often highlighting the importance of precision in weights and measures.

Pillar of the Community
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5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  5:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Philadelphia mint in early lithograph. Below that an early stereograph image of the same view. Note how the tree in front has grown.


Pillar of the Community
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 Posted 01/14/2017  6:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Amazing stereograph image shows the San Francisco Mint standing while the rest of the city is reduced to rubble after the Earthquake and fires of 1906.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lithograph of early Mint gold assay process.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The mint's gold bullion for coin making.



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United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Modern Silver ASE obverse dies.



And they still polish dies by hand.

Pillar of the Community
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6326 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:34 pm  Show Profile   Check TypeCoin971793's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add TypeCoin971793 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I really appreciate this compilation you are making. I like reading the little factoids and the more-detailed stories, with pictures to boot!


Quote:
For just $5.5 million, you can currently purchase one of the coins presented to President Washington. This is the finest early cent known today. If you can't get excited by this, check your pulse.


And for $55,000, you can get a letter that was Handwritten and signed by President Washington, which would be a truly unique piece of history. Which is the better deal?


Quote:
The existence of the 1913 liberty head nickel was rumored but unconfirmed in 1919. I was not until 1920 at the ANA Convention that the world was able to see a 1913 LHN. Remember that in 1919, people were getting over a World War unlike anyone had ever seen in history. Still they were willing to pay $500 for a nickel without ever having seen one.


Not quite true. Samuel Brown was an employee at the mint who had illegally produced dies for the 1913 nickels and struck the coins using mint equipment. However, to not face legal trouble, he kept the nickels' existence a secret until the statute of limitations expired in 1920. In 1919, Brown cleverly used the Numismatist to "legitimize" the five nickels by hiding their origin and making it looks like he had purchased them from the public for $500 each. If the public knew of their illegal origins, they would be seen as illegitimate fantasy issues (which they still are, so I still don't understand the idiocy of paying millions of dollars for these coins), and thus they would have no value. Of course, Brown never bought any, and though he was sent several 1910's and 1912's that were altered. Brown ran the advertisement for a few months before making his five coins known to the world, which were readily bought by eager collectors.
Life is like a box of chocolates. A cheap, thoughtless, perfunctory gift that nobody ever asks for. Unreturnable because all you get back is another box of chocolates. So you're stuck with this undefinable whipped mint crap that you mindlessly wolf down when there's nothing else left to eat. Sure, once in a while there's a peanut butter cup or an English toffee. But they're gone too fast and the taste is... fleeting. So, you end up with nothing but broken bits filled with hardened jelly and teeth-shattering nuts. And if you're desperate enough to eat those, all you got left is an empty box filled with useless brown paper wrappers.
Edited by TypeCoin971793
01/14/2017 6:36 pm
Pillar of the Community
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5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the clarification TypeCoin!

The end product.


Edited by numismatic student
01/14/2017 6:51 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  6:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Metals for coinmaking are rolled into long sheets and coiled into cylinders. Plachets are punched out from these sheets.


Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  9:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Money in Circulation 1860-1898. Note how Gold Coin drops to almost nothing in 1862 and stays there until 1879. Also silver takes off starting 1875 with Western State production, depressing world silver prices.

Edited by numismatic student
01/14/2017 9:12 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
7540 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  9:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CoinCollector2012 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
John Quincy Adams was the only U.S. President known to have been a serious collector of coins.



Thomas Jefferson also had an interest in European coinage...

https://www.monticello.org/site/res...n-collection


A lot of cool stuff has been posted so far.
Sets in progress... Mercury dimes, Washington quarters, 7070 Type Set, WLH Short Set
View my collection here! http://www.coincommunity.org/galler...hp?cat=10518
My Want List: http://goccf.com/t/328488
ANA: 3183215
New Member
United States
37 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  9:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jillabean to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't have anything to add to the thread except a thank you for starting it and to all who contributed to it. It's pretty cool!
Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2017  10:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think the interest that Jefferson had in European coinage emanated mainly from his interest in establishing beautiful designs for our own domestic coinage. Later, his diplomatic duties as Secretary of State and President led him to accumulate gifts from abroad. My understanding is that TJ was a bibliophile, having collected the greatest private library assembled in the New World. The research CC2012 posted is extremely interesting - thanks for posting it - but it doesn't seem to indicate that he was intentionally assembling a coin collection.
Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2017  12:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Coin storage and presentation case in the style of Louis XIV, the Sun King.

Pillar of the Community
United States
5557 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2017  12:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Coin Cabinet by Charles Percier in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. The form is from a jewelry case owned by Josephine Bonaparte, wife of one Napoleon.


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