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Question About Unusual Coinage Materials/Post Your Unusual Materials Coins!

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 Posted 12/01/2019  3:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
China, Manchoukuo, Japanese puppet government 1945 Red Fiber


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 Posted 12/01/2019  3:34 pm  Show Profile   Check casualcoincollector's eBay Listings Check casualcoincollector's eCrater Listings Bookmark this reply Add casualcoincollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@nautilator, IndianGoldEagle,

Great posts guys!

@nautilator,

If you don't mind me asking how much did the leather one Kroner run you?


I recently picked up one of my list items from an auction in London. Finally procured a Lava Medal. It's from the 1889 eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and even better than that I really like the subject matter. In that it is a medal of Galileo and not just some random Italian king.
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 Posted 12/02/2019  11:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That Lava Medal is amazing, nice find.
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 Posted 12/02/2019  12:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I finally got me one of the Mattighofen leather notgelds. The 10 was posted some pages ago, but the 1 kroner hasn't yet.
Very nice!
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 Posted 12/11/2019  3:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Saxony, brown porcelain


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 Posted 12/11/2019  5:33 pm  Show Profile   Check yellow88's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add yellow88 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1944-1945 HT OPA Red Point 1 Ration Token. It is made of vulcanized fiber (celluloid) and 16mm in size.

-OPA stands for Office of Price Administration
-Rationing was first started in 1942. Items that were rationed include canned goods, meats, sugar, coffee, tires, gas and more.
-The Office of Price Administration used OPA stamps, coins, and chits for rationing.
-OPA tokens (commonly called OPAs) were used for change for food.
-OPAs were used by retailers to give change back for food bought with ration stamps.
-Blue tokens were used for processed foods; red tokens for meats and fats.
-OPAs were first issued in 1944
-Stopped being issued in 1945
-Nobody has found a true reason for the letters on the OPA's. Theories include, they are random; demographics; and prevention of counterfeiting.
-Red letter combinations known. HC, HT, MM, MV, TH, TY, UC, UH, UT, UV, UX, UY, VC, VH, VT, VU, VX, VY, XC, XH, XT, XU, XV, XY, YC, YH, YT, YU, YV, YX.
-Blue letter combinations known. CC, CH, CT, CV, CX, HH, HU, HV, HX, HY, TC, TT, TU, TV, TX, UU, VV, WC, WH, WT, WU, WW, XX, YY
-The rarest is the red MV. The next rarest are the blue WH and then red MM and the blue CX and WC. Then blue WW and XX. The rest are fairly easy to find. Reds are a lot more common than blues.
-OPA tokens were used for rationing during World War II
-There are 30 different red tokens and 24 blue ones.
-Blue ones read: OPA Blue Point 1 (with two different letters)
-Red ones read: OPA Red Point 1 (with two different letters)

"Reality is that which when you stop believing in it, it doesn't go away."- philip k dick

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 Posted 12/13/2019  12:25 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If you don't mind me asking how much did the leather one Kroner run you?

Surprise, some new posts. Er, well I asked an expert who actually has contact with whoever's written a catalog on Austrian notgeld, and was told that the little ones (10s) could reasonably be 50 euros and have gotten quite scarce as of late. The 1kr? Around $75 or so I suppose. (I got a bit of a discount on this because of an issue that the dealer had to resolve.)

If you come across another lava medal would you mind notifying me? I'd still like to get a hold of one of those too though I find it hard to actively look for them.

I just got me a bois durci (blood and sawdust) medal but not in hand yet. Those seem common enough and there are a number on ebay.
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 Posted 12/13/2019  03:42 am  Show Profile   Check casualcoincollector's eBay Listings Check casualcoincollector's eCrater Listings Bookmark this reply Add casualcoincollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@nautilator,


Quote:
If you come across another lava medal would you mind notifying me? I'd still like to get a hold of one of those too though I find it hard to actively look for them.


Sure, will do but it may be awhile. It took about two years for the lava medal that I bought to come onto the market.

This isn't one of mine but it is something interesting that I came across recently. It's a German uranium medal and yes it is radioactive but it is native uranium so only slightly.

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 Posted 12/13/2019  11:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've heard of such things before. Not that I'd expect them to be common but I find searching for element-based medals to be very difficult to do, double when they're foreign-made.
Valued Member
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 Posted 12/13/2019  11:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
CCC: do you ever collect plated coins? Those seem to be really difficult due to it being hard to tell what they actually are. Some of the platings I've gotten (not all in hand yet) include brass-plated steel, gold-plated brass, silver-plated brass, and gold-plated zinc for example.

On the other hand, I've identified more woods than the last time when I tried making a list of them. So far I've figured out 12, many of which are extremely obscure, like a few Washington medals made of cherry wood. Here's a trade token that I'm pretty sure is palm wood.



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 Posted 12/17/2019  5:13 pm  Show Profile   Check casualcoincollector's eBay Listings Check casualcoincollector's eCrater Listings Bookmark this reply Add casualcoincollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@nautilator,

The only plated piece that I picked up was the chrome plated WWII Canadian Nickel but I only got that due to the fact that there are no solid or high alloyed chrome circulating coins that I know of. Other than that I haven't really looked into plated coins that much.

That thing about the wooden tokens is pretty cool I wouldn't have expected there to be at least 12 but I guess it makes sense since different trees grow in different locals. Here is a question for you. Have you come across any tokens made of coconut shell? Just curious since it is a common enough material that I would have assumed at some point that someone would have made a token out of it but I have yet to come across one.
Edited by casualcoincollector
12/17/2019 5:15 pm
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Canada
3506 Posts
 Posted 12/17/2019  5:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@casual, what is the weight and diameter of your lava medal?

And do you know if the uranium medal is supposed to be pure or an alloy?

Uranium is chemically very reactive.
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 Posted 12/17/2019  5:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Woods that I know of:
Apple: used in some obscure token I have to think of to remember.

Balsa: those flat wooden nickels, and some coin club issues that have face values.

Cedar: Tenino depression wooden money, and related.

Cherry: a couple of century-old George Washington medals.

Cork: the Beaver Falls corkwood nickels.

Maple: Canadian maple syrup festival wooden nickels, quarters, and related.

Myrtle: North Bend depression scrip.

Palm: the above.

Pear: Hungarian medal made to look like a coin, currently available from the Hungarian mint.

Plywood: a few depression scrip and related, a few German notgeld.

Spruce: British Columbia sprucewood dollars.

Walnut: the Philadelphia centennial expo of 1876 medals.


There are others but I have no details. I've been told without any sort of detail that something from Canada is wood with the bark still on it. I'm quite sure there are more but am not able to identify them. No coconut.
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 Posted 12/17/2019  8:05 pm  Show Profile   Check casualcoincollector's eBay Listings Check casualcoincollector's eCrater Listings Bookmark this reply Add casualcoincollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@nautilator,

Thanks for the list!

@oriole,

The lava medal is relatively large at about 160 grams and about 7cm to 8cm in diameter depending upon where you measure.

The Uranium medal is supposedly made of Torbernite (a uranium ore), Torbernite contains around .003% uranium. That's probably enough uranium to put its radioactivity on par with objects painted with radium paint from the early to mid 1900's and would only peak the meter on a Geiger counter on the most sensitive setting. If the medal were pure uranium a person in direct contact with it would most likely succumb to radiation poisoning in a matter of seconds without proper radiation shielding. Even modern nuclear reactors only run off of about 3% to 5% pure uranium.
Edited by casualcoincollector
12/17/2019 8:19 pm
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