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Question About Unusual Coinage Materials/Post Your Unusual Materials Coins!

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 Posted 01/21/2021  2:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add pepactonius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Kingdom of Thailand -- 10 satang, 1945 (tin):





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 Posted 01/21/2021  2:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Tin money is rarely studies, nor are base metal alloys. There's an older coin somewhere that's a tin-lead alloy.
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 Posted 01/21/2021  2:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add keith12 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1964 Vatican City 100 Lire (Stainless Steel)


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 Posted 01/21/2021  3:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


This is a modern silver coin that comes with a (loose) wood panel for decoration. The panel modern (clearly laser cut) and I wonder if it's been chemically treated to cause the toning under mine.




Also, I don't think I ever posted this: dirt.

These are plastic packets that supposedly contain tailings from a gold mill. A lot of these were 'minted'.
Edited by nautilator
01/21/2021 3:53 pm
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 Posted 01/27/2021  12:30 am  Show Profile   Check casualcoincollector's eBay Listings Check casualcoincollector's eCrater Listings Bookmark this reply Add casualcoincollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I just acquired these recently. They are Myrtle Wood Depression Scrip from North Bend Oregon. The wood grain on these two is just absolutely beautiful. I'm planning on swapping out the current Blaine wooden nickel in my set with the North Bend Dollar below.

First issue 50 Cent:


Second issue 1 Dollar:

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 Posted 01/27/2021  01:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Myrtle is by far the nicest of the 24 woods I've come across thus far. You really can't describe or picture just how nice the lacquering makes these.
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 Posted 01/27/2021  02:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Oh. There are in fact quite a number of things I haven't been adding here. Some of them I haven't even taken pictures of mine or don't have in hand so I'll substitute a few pictures.


This is a large Soviet medal made to commemorate their space program, and is made with whatever they made their space shuttles with. It's quite heavy and non-magnetic.



These are one of the very few types of (numismatic) ivory out there. When you were admitted to the Royal Academy you got one of these ivory tickets with your information engraved on them, and they functioned like a school id back in those days.




Royal Mint, Llantrisant trade tokens. They made these because you couldn't take money into the mint. They are some of the fairly scarce laminated tokens out there.


(Others include a few cigar tokens, such as this Bercovich one, and the only round token I know that fits the bill was apparently issued for the SS North Carolina, but I have no background information on that one.)










From St Polten and Zell, these are some of the better but affordable wooden notgeld. There's apparently a wooden one that's worth around 1000.





AAFES pogs are pretty easy to get these days and they are similar in composition to the Transnistria tokens posted previously. (They're probably a plastic-coated paper composition.) One or two per series have a plastic surface that's lenticular.




A number of unusual medals have been made for expos. This one is particle board or similar. These particular ones used to have ribbons attached to them, though those are often long gone. At least one of these particle board medals was scented with perfume when new (I don't think it was this one).
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 Posted 01/27/2021  09:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fantastic examples! I like those myrtle wood tokens especially.
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 Posted 01/27/2021  10:51 am  Show Profile   Check chafemasterj's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add chafemasterj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You guys have some awesome items. How do you store or display your collections? I've seen leather items that would dry out if not stored properly and others that I'd assume require special care. How do you address such issues? Again. This is one of my favorite threads on the CCF. Thanks for everything you share.
Check out my counterstamped Lincoln Cent collection:
http://goccf.com/t/303507
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 Posted 01/29/2021  6:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Storage is a pretty serious issue that's not necessarily resolvable. Everything that can go in standard flips and the likes does, others are put in cardboard boxes and whatever fits them. There are so many unusual dimensions that specific supplies could probably be its own thing by itself.

Leather storage is not a very big deal. Drying out doesn't seem to be an issue. The 200-year-old Estonian scrip is still pliant. Others are naturally hard as they are.

Of course, that having been said, I think there is something that "tones" them.


Both these leather medals have some sort of spotted toning on them, it's more visible on the Columbian expo one. I don't know why this happens and my best guess is by whatever box it originally came from.

Another major consideration is that if you leave leather notes in damp situations they will go moldy.

Here are better images of the above: an 1893 Columbian Expo medal, and a 1908 John Reid (Australia).




Edited by nautilator
01/29/2021 6:26 pm
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 Posted 01/29/2021  7:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here are a few more of my recent leather items. Nearly all of these have blank reverses.


Riverton Lions Club, WY depression scrip. Only place other than Enterprise to issue buckskin currency, and only on the 50c denomination.
Seattle Coin Club $2 bill.
Trial strike(?) of Crescent City Coin Club, LA medal.


The Traveller, Canada, 15% off trade token.
Costa Rica coffee pickers token.
Kentucky coal cart tag.
Febe's, San Francisco, 25c.
The Cows Outside (leather goods store), MN, 5c.
Apparently a railroad-related medal...
Leather Expressions, IA, advertising token.
Seattle Coin Club 40c. (I'd like to think those were legit trade tokens for a time.)


On a different note,

I don't normally go into primitive moneys and I don't really consider them money in the same sense as other things here, but might be nice to show off.

Togo stone money. There's some debate as to whether this one is really money.
Boar's tusk used for trade in East Africa, and porcelain replicas because real ones were really hard to get.
Silver bracelet, one of many used for trade in the Congo.
Bronze slave trade bracelet attributed to Cameroon.



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 Posted 02/05/2021  02:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nautilator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

While zinc is not rare by any means, this is one of the few that is specifically zinc for the sake of zinc.

There are a handful of similar tokens out there, like that Union Pacific one made of a 'sample of aluminum that makes Union Pacific trains' as well as an American tin token that I have that's quite a bit rarer.




This is a small terracotta token from Nepal. It may be a trade token but I don't really know anything about its specific use. One of these was included in a HAE auction with Nepal trade tokens,
https://ha-europe.com/en/browse?aid...24&lid=29730

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