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Fun For History Buffs: "When This Coin Was Made..."

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 Posted 08/07/2017  4:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cross posting this one:
India (Gujarat), Western Satraps
Rudrasena II as Mahakshatrapa, SE 200, 278 AD; final year of issue.




In or about 278:
- Roman emperor Probus manages to begin the reversal of the damage done by the marauding barbarian tribes for the past 50 years. In 278 he gives the order to settle (friendly) German tribes in the devastated regions as a buffer against further attack.
- Constantine is about 6 years old, living with his father Constantius Chlorus, and mother Helena.
-Bahram II has been the Persian Shah for about 2 years. Presumably still a child, he becomes tyrannical and is almost assasinated. He sparks a civil war that by 282 allows Rome to invade and sack his capital at Ctesiphon.
- Vasudeva III is the emperor of the Kushan empire, and may have been Rudrasena II's overlord.
- China is in the final years of the 60-year civil war known as the Three Kingdoms period. Wu of Jin would emerge victorious and re-unify China by 280.
- Beginning of the "classical" Mayan period as the Maya culture emerges as the dominant Mesoamerican force.
- Rough estimate of human discovery of Hawaii.

E:
Another fun fact; this may have been one of only two silver coin types still in production by the end of the 3rd century; the Western Satrap drachms were produced in huge numbers, as were the large thin drachms of the Sassanians. The Kushans only coined gold and bronze, and the Roman antoninianus was a measly 4.76% silver; in effect bronze. China was in the middle of the Wu Zhu coinage; exclusively bronze. The rest of the world was either not monetized, or used foreign currency in conjunction with locally produced bronze.
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Edited by Finn235
08/07/2017 4:56 pm
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 Posted 08/07/2017  6:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
E:
Another fun fact; this may have been one of only two silver coin types still in production by the end of the 3rd century; the Western Satrap drachms were produced in huge numbers, as were the large thin drachms of the Sassanians. The Kushans only coined gold and bronze, and the Roman antoninianus was a measly 4.76% silver; in effect bronze. China was in the middle of the Wu Zhu coinage; exclusively bronze. The rest of the world was either not monetized, or used foreign currency in conjunction with locally produced bronze.
Not quite - the silver drachms of Endubis of Axum might have already started being made that early.
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 Posted 08/07/2017  8:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hence why I said "may"

I actually did not think Aksum made coins until almost a century later; googling around I could only find a single specimen of the Endubis drachm; not sure whether most were melted, or I'm not searching right, or if they are just silly rare.

There are also probably other silver coins made by more minor kingdoms, but for now I am drawing a blank.
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 Posted 08/08/2017  06:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Hence why I said "may"

I actually did not think Aksum made coins until almost a century later; googling around I could only find a single specimen of the Endubis drachm; not sure whether most were melted, or I'm not searching right, or if they are just silly rare.

There are also probably other silver coins made by more minor kingdoms, but for now I am drawing a blank.
None of the more minor kingdoms I checked, anyway (though I wasn't very thorough with my search).
Apparently the archer obols of Sogdiana mentioned in this thread were made continously through the first few centuries AD; there is no way to say whether the production ever stopped, however, because the types aren't identified closer than the approximate century.

My first idea was Bosporus - their staters slowly debased from gold to silver to bronze, and I hoped that circa 280 AD would catch them as silver; but apparently their silver to bronze debasement happened about as the same time as that of the antoninianus (perhaps related to it?), and by the late 270s they were essentially bronze.
(I have a really bad one from Thothorses, later in the 3rd century; and I was pretty sure I had a decent billon example too, but I must have misplaced the coin - if I even did buy it - and in any case forgot the ruler.)

As for Axum - the traditional dating for this issue is "270/290-300", which may mean 270-300, 290-300, 270-290 (as Numista interprets it), or something else entirely. There is no reason to assume it was produced as early as 278 AD (hence why I said "might").
I don't think the Numista and Wildwinds examples are the same coin, however (and I'm pretty sure I've seen yet another example on VCoins).
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 Posted 08/08/2017  11:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TNG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Seems we might be drifting off course ...

When this Three Cent Silver Trime was minted in 1851


Herman Melville writes the novel Moby Dick

When Ahab finally appears on the quarterdeck, he announces he is out for revenge on the white whale which took one leg from the knee down and left him with a prosthesis fashioned from a whale's jawbone.



Ahab will give the first man to sight Moby Dick a doubloon, a gold coin, which he nails to the mast.



Before ANACS could it be that there was an AHABS Coin Grading Service?

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 Posted 08/08/2017  2:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Japan 5 sen, Meiji 10 / 1877



It would be an understatement to say that the transition of Japan from an isolated feudal society to an industrial superpower in the span of 40 years was a culture shock to most. When the Tokugawa Shogunate voluntarily dissolved and restored the Emperor to power, the Meiji Restoration began and Japan launched a carefully calculated modernization plan. That left little room for Samurai, who were traditionally under worked and overpaid. The feudal lords were given government positions and hefty pensions. Common samurai were allowed to keep their titles (which meant nothing) and given employment preference and a little bonus cash plus the traditional rice stipends. Not surprisingly, a lot of formerly powerful individuals resented working actual jobs alongside former peasants. Many ended up unemployed.

Like all government promises, this one ran out of steam and in 1877 the Meiji government announced the end of rice stipends for Samurai. A high ranking samurai named Saigo Takamori recalled the disaffected samurai to his military academy in Kagoshima and on January 29 1877, the fearful government sent a warship to disarm the academy and surrounding area. They were repelled and the samurai responded by raiding nearby arsenals to stockpile munitions. They turned to Takamori for leadership, and he reluctantly agreed to lead the resistance movement that would be known as the Satsuma Rebellion.



The rebels marched to the nearest defensible position and laid seige to the centuries-old fort at Kumamoto. They could not press the army conscripts there to surrender, and after several days of blockading the fort, they were forced to flee upon the arrival of the Imperial army.

Meanwhile, a contingent of Samurai met the Imperial army in a bloody battle on the island of Kumamoto. The Imperial army was victorious, but both sides suffered massive casualties.


Painting by Kobayashi Eitaku

The Army managed to surround the rebels, but Saigo managed to cut through and regroup at Mount Shiroyama by September 1877. Reduced to just 500 men and completely out of ammo, the Samurai made a famous last stand. Saigo was mortally wounded by gunfire and assisted in committing seppuku for an honorable death. The remaining 40 Samurai then charged the Imperial army with nothing but their swords and were annihilated on September 24.



The rebellion was extremely costly for the Japanese government, causing the abandonment of the gold standard and rising inflation. As a consequence, 1877 was the last year of issue for the silver 5 sen (for circulation; it was revived in 1880 and 1892 for a limited number of sets).

The Satsuma Rebellion was romanticized (highly inaccurately) for the move "The Last Samurai".

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 Posted 08/08/2017  8:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Arkie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply



On December 22, 1815, the Catholic priest turned revolutionary leader Jose Maria Morelos was shot for rebellion.

Morelos was born in New Spain the town of his nativity was posthumously named in his honor and entered adulthood a humble agricultural laborer before engaging the career in letters necessary to undertake Holy Orders.

Designated to save his countrymen's souls, he proposed instead to save their liberties and ungratefully joined up with fellow-priest Miguel Hidalgo when the latter sounded the tocsin for the Mexican War of Independence.

Morelos distinguished himself rapidly in the revolutionary army, and upon Hidalgo's capture attained its leadership, complete with Generalissimo status.

Upon capture, he was handled first and rather meticulously by the Inquisition, which defrocked him in an auto de fe before relaxing him to the secular authority for the inevitable punishment.

Without a dissentient voice it [was] agreed that . [Morelos] be declared guilty of malicious and pertinacious imperfect confession, a formal heretic who denied his guilt, a disturber and persecutor of the hierarchy and a profaner of the sacraments; that he was guilty of high treason, divine and human, pontifical and royal . his property should be confiscated to the king . His three children were declared subject to infamy and the legal disabilities of descendants of heretics.

Nobody said being a national hero was easy.

* "His morals were those of his class," remarks our source on the Inquisition. "He admitted to having three children, born of different mothers during his priesthood, but he added that his habits, though not edifying, had not been scandalous, and the tribunal seemed to think so, for little attention was paid to this during his trial."
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 Posted 08/08/2017  9:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TNG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Arkie and Finn neat threads! Can you imagine the carnage of sword fighting battles?
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 Posted 08/08/2017  10:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add malgal to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good reading!
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 Posted 08/09/2017  01:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TNG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When this coin was made ...
1865 US Two Cents





Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, while attending the play Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C., as the American Civil War was drawing to a close.

The assassination occurred five days after the commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, surrendered to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and the Union Army of the Potomac.


This is the last known high-quality photograph of Lincoln.
Lincoln on the White House balcony, March 6, 1865.

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 Posted 08/09/2017  02:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is an awesome thread; just seeing it now. I will work on a worth entry tomorrow.


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 Posted 08/09/2017  2:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
This is an awesome thread
I agree. I have been trying to come up with something to go with one of my Ikes, but the bar has been set pretty high here.


Quote:
I will work on a worth entry tomorrow.


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 Posted 08/09/2017  8:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bump111 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That final photo of President Lincoln always made me sad. You can see the toll that war had taken on him. Maybe my favorite president.
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