Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest! Check out our Google+!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

2018 World War I Centennial Silver Medals  
 

Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 11
Valued Member
United States
478 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2018  1:22 pm  Show Profile   Check BadDog's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add BadDog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Those are numbers for the individual coins that were ordered.



It's yet to be seen if the Mint is going to report sales of the medals. I guess we'll find out with tomorrow's (assuming the US Government is working again ) production report.

As far as first day sales for the stand alone commemoratives go, 17,287 for the proof looks to be consistent with the recent past.

First WEEK reported sales for the 2016 Mark Twain $1 proof were 37,198, the 2016 National Parks $1 proof were 19,518, the 2017 Lions Club $1 proof were 23,349 and the lack luster 2017 Boys Town $1 proof were 9,044 (and took 6 weeks to break through 17k of sales).
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4141 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2018  2:18 pm  Show Profile   Check Foxwoods Man's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Foxwoods Man to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It will be interesting to see if the Mint reports those individual set sales
Valued Member
United States
122 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2018  2:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Taphandle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Those are numbers for the individual coins that were ordered.


You are correct Sir, it was early this morning when I read it the first time. Sorry for the misinformation. That does sort of change things.

Hopefully the mint will list the proof, unc and all sets separately on the sales report.

Again I apologize for my mis-statement.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3798 Posts
 Posted 01/24/2018  10:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
First WWI medals sales report from the Mint (as of 1/21/18):

Army: 11,272
Navy: 9,334
Marines: 9,417
Air Service: 9,343
Coast Guard: 7,695

TOTAL MEDALS SOLD: 47,061 (47% of medals available)


Individual Silver Dollar (Proof): 24,989
Individual Silver Dollar (Unc): 10,013

Total Silver Dollar (Proof): 72,050


Collecting history, one commemorative coin (or medal) at a time!
Original content (c) Commems, 2012-2018
Edited by commems
01/24/2018 10:50 am
Valued Member
United States
478 Posts
 Posted 01/24/2018  11:44 am  Show Profile   Check BadDog's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add BadDog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Commems! Looks like the government shutdown only delayed the report by less than a day.

The proofs are already showing up on eBay. Looks like the pricing range goes from a low of $60.99 to a high of $77.95 w/S&H, all for ungraded OGP coins. Of course you can order direct from the mint for $56.90 w/S&H until the intro price ends and the regular price increases it to $61.90. MCM did have NGC graded 69s and 70s for sale, but they're currently sold out.
Valued Member
United States
206 Posts
 Posted 01/28/2018  11:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I was utterly mystified by "WOODS NOW US MARINE CORPS ENTIRELY".

I was 'raised' on WW2, and know its phrases - "Day of Infamy", "the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell", etc - and am markedly less familiar with the Great War - but I'd never heard of this phrase, period, so I fired-up the Google Ngram Viewer, and ...

The Great War introduced us to "shell-shock" ...



... which became WW2's "combat fatigue".



The Great War also introduced us to "trench foot", the use of which spiked again in WW2 ...



World War Two's iconic phrases included Churchill's "We shall defend our island" (et al) and Roosevelt's "(day) which will live in infamy" (Pearl Harbor), both of which were widely quoted and, then, less widely quoted, to wit:





So now let's take a look at "Woods now US Marine Corps (entirely)", which was rarely quoted (compare the Y-axis incidence percentages with the other phrases, above) and, then, disappeared entirely for decades:



Clearly, one of these things is not like the other.

I understand that one purpose of commemorative NCLT & Medals is to teach us history, but if a phrase was so quickly and utterly forgotten, is it history?

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
Why collect coins? Memory is the second thing to go. The use of money is the last thing to go.
Valued Member
United States
163 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  09:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add mellamobradley46 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
buy "Woods now US Marine Corps (entirely)" just rolls off the tongue
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
58050 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  11:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I was utterly mystified by "WOODS NOW US MARINE CORPS ENTIRELY"... I understand that one purpose of commemorative NCLT & Medals is to teach us history, but if a phrase was so quickly and utterly forgotten, is it history?
It is a reference to an important part of WWI history.

Quote:
On 26 June, the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, under command of Major Maurice E. Shearer, supported by two companies of the 4th Machine Gun Battalion and the 15th Company of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, made an attack on Belleau Wood, which finally cleared that forest of Germans. On that day, Major Shearer submitted a report simply stating, "Woods now U.S. Marine Corps entirely", ending one of the bloodiest and most ferocious battles U.S. forces would fight in the war.
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battl...Belleau_Wood
Valued Member
United States
206 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  12:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
jbuck: I understand that the phrase is recoverable from history, but it clearly meant next to nothing to the generation that fought the war.

Three of the medals bear no legend, so why grace this one medal with a phrase mostly-long-forgotten?

Why not leave the Marine Corps medal text-free?

And why is "OVER THERE!" on the Navy medal?

Surely we all understand the phrase to apply to the Army, more so than any other branch of the service?

It was a seven-seas blue-water Navy, so "the Yanks are coming" hardly applies to the Navy, as it was always "OVER THERE!"

A phrase that is going to grace a coin or medal should mean something to the generation that lived the event.

For example, here is the Google Ngram for 1967's "the Temple Mount is in our hands":



Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
Why collect coins? Memory is the second thing to go. The use of money is the last thing to go.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
58050 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  5:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
A phrase that is going to grace a coin or medal should mean something to the generation that lived the event.
Well, there are no World War I veterans alive today to tell us whether you are right or wrong about the phrase being meaningless to them.

Personally, I like the choice. It made me research the phrase and learn something I previously did not know. I know my opinion alone does not amount to squat, but I still like it.
Valued Member
United States
206 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  8:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Methodology matters.

The default in Google Ngram Viewer is to apply a smoothing function to the raw results.

Smoothing functions take the choppiness (noise) (local variations) out of a data stream; in general, this allows us to see more of the forest as we see less of the trees.

But the phrase "WOODS NOW US MARINE CORPS ENTIRELY" was used so rarely that the smoothing function distorts more than it clarifies ... because it creates data points that did not exist!

Below please find the ~identical Ngram, but with the smoothing function disabled (eg, smoothing equals zero).

As we can now see, the phrase only appeared in print in 1923 and not, again, until 1960. In the years 1924 through 1959, the phrase did not appear in print.

(Okay, sure, that overstates the universality of Google Books, but that's not too risky an overstatement in most applications).

If the WW1 vets were not writing that phrase, they were not reading that phrase ... so how were they to hear of it, let alone find meaning & resonance?

Compare the disappearance of this phrase (did anyone on this list hear it from their GrandPa?) with the phrases that went immediately into circulation, and stayed in circulation, such as "over there", "trench foot", "shell shock", etc.

I apologize: it has been decades since I needed to chart data, so the impact of the smoothing function was not immediately clear to me.



Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
Why collect coins? Memory is the second thing to go. The use of money is the last thing to go.
Pillar of the Community
United States
751 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  9:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CollegeBarbers to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Has anyone received an individual proof or uncirculated dollar yet? I'm curious to know what everyone thinks of the coin and its design in hand.
Searching for some US modern coins (cents through dollars) via my want list.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3798 Posts
 Posted 01/29/2018  9:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I received my coins last week (Monday).

I purchased an individual uncirculated coin along with multiple proofs via the five coin-and-medal sets.

The first thing that I noticed was that the finish is more brilliant than in recent years. Rather than the very satiny (or frosted) appearance that recent uncirculated SDs have featured, the finish on my WWI coin was reminiscent of the finish seen on SDs from the 1980s and 1990s.

I'm not complaining, I was just surprised to see it after years of "super satin" SDs.

As far as the design goes, it's not my favorite but it's not bad by any means. I think the obverse with the soldier is a bit crowded - squeezing in IGWT in front of the soldier's face was a design mistake in my opinion. The reverse is fine, it has almost become standard to feature the red poppy flower on WWI commemorative coins - multiple countries have taken such an approach. Overall, I would give it a B.

Here are a couple of images...

Note: The haziness seen is the result of my scanning the coins - no such haziness is visible when the coin is viewed in hand.







Collecting history, one commemorative coin (or medal) at a time!
Original content (c) Commems, 2012-2018
Edited by commems
01/29/2018 9:48 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
751 Posts
 Posted 01/30/2018  7:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CollegeBarbers to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice commentary commems! I just received my uncirculated dollar today and I spent extra time examining the finish in light of your comments. I also noticed that it was more brilliant/less satiny than my 2012 Star Spangled Banner dollar, the most recent uncirculated commemorative I have. The design is growing on me, although I agree that the obverse is a bit crowded. I definitely don't think it deserves all the bad rap it has received. Overall, I'm very pleased with my purchase.
Searching for some US modern coins (cents through dollars) via my want list.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3798 Posts
 Posted 01/31/2018  06:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Mint's week two update for the WWI medals sales (as of 1/28/18):

Army: 13,143 (+1,871)
Navy: 10,934 (+1,600)
Marines: 10,930 (+1,513)
Air Service: 11,007 (+1,664)
Coast Guard: 8,910 (+1,215)

TOTAL MEDALS SOLD: 54,924 (+7,863) (55% of medals available)


Individual Silver Dollar (Proof): 29,580 (+4,591)
Individual Silver Dollar (Unc): 11,561 (+1,548)

Total Silver Dollar (Proof): 84,504 (+12,454)


The numbers from last week and this week suggest, at least to me, that many collectors are buying all five coin-medal sets in order to get one of each medal; the sales figures are advancing by very similar amounts.


Collecting history, one commemorative coin (or medal) at a time!
Original content (c) Commems, 2012-2018
Page: of 11 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Ending Soon   Newly Listed   Lowest Price   Highest Price   Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Forums
It took 1.35 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05