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A Compendium Of Numismatic Displays In Museums Around The World (Evergreen)

 
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 Posted 03/01/2019  05:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As promised, here is some information about the other museum I visited in Ljubljana (The National Museum of Slovenia).

If you have one shot to get your numismatic fix in Ljubljana, then this is your spot. Virtually every sign was bilingual (Slovenian and English); however, a few videos were only in Slovenian. There were multiple video screens with your choice of ten languages (including English). I only spent two hours here but could have spent more. There were multiple exhibits of hoards that had just piles and piles of Roman coins. I can see why there is so much Roman material that comes from this general area. Additionally, there was quite a bit of information about the two separate groups of Celtic peoples that migrated through this region. Here is an excerpt from one of the helpful museum signs:


Quote:
The first group [of Celtic migrants] was initially (in the 2nd century BC) mainly limited to southern Carinthia in Austria and north-eastern Italy, while the coins of the second group, with only the horse, predominantly circulated in central and eastern Slovenia as well as in north-western Croatia. The coins of the first group bear legends in Venetic and later Latin, while only a limited number of the coins of the second group bear legends at all. The coins of the first group have been attributed to the Carni and the Norici, those of the second group to the Taurisci. in the 1st century BC, the use of the coins of the first group spread to the area of Slovenia, which previously only used coins of the second group. The hoards of coins show that, contemporaneously with the large and small Celtic silver coins, Roman Republican coins were in circulation in this period.



Non-flash photography is allowed.



This small hoard of gold coins was determined to have been buried in August of 352 AD:





Here is a hoard of 3511 silver coins buried sometime after 273 AD. How would you like to stumble on something like this?




And here are a couple pretty pristine Denarii that I believe were issued by Julius (left) and Augustus (right) Caesar:
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
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 Posted 04/13/2019  1:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I was pretty busy travelling last Fall and need to clear off some of the pics that I took, including visits to two different museums in Constance Germany.

First up is the Archaeologisches Landesmuseum Konstanz. Non-flash photography is allowed. All signs are German-language only, but an audio tour in English is a free add-on.

As the focus of this museum is on archaeology (obviously), most of the numismatic material on display is by-catch from various digs and hoards. One amazing hoard of gold coins had an adjoining sign that discussed the importance of medieval Constanz in European trade. Here is my rough translation of the German:


Quote:
In 1905 a large treasure, hidden around 1390, came to light at 18 Rose Garden Street with around 1500 gold coins. This location was the headquarters for a medieval merchant. The origin of the coins showcases the main directions of the former Constance trade, namely the BŁndner Passes to Italy, through central Switzerland to Southern France, along the Rhine River to Flanders, over Nuremberg to the Northeast, and along the Danube River to Austria and Hungary.


There was a particularly nice display of pilgrim badges.

In the adjoining gift shop you can purchase copies of a variety of ancient and medieval coins. Sadly, none of these pieces are marked "copy" although the rough cast fabric of these pieces should be a giveaway as to their true nature.



Displays of hoard with Roman, medieval, and Greek coins:






Pilgrim badges:




Medieval gold coin hoard showing trading routes:




Museum store display with unmarked cast fakes:

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Edited by Spence
04/13/2019 1:16 pm
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 Posted 04/13/2019  2:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Rosgartenmuseum (Rose Garden Museum) in Constanz is actually a much better choice for the traveling numismatist who finds himself or herself in Konstanz Germany.

Non-flash photography allowed. All signs are German-language only. If you are typical thick-headed American like me who barely knows his Knie from his Kopf, I recommend that you take pics of the accompanying text. When you get back to your hotel you can enter the text into google translate to understand the nuances of what you have seen. Seems like there ought to be a translation app that works off of pics (not text). Please let me know if anyone out there knows of a good one. Being firmly uni-lingual is a real drag sometimes.

(I wrote up this discussion several months ago and in the meantime have discovered a that the Google Translate app does exactly what I was looking for. Simply aim your phone at the foreign text and then look at it through the screen for a real-time translation. Wicked cool!)

For me, the numismatic highlight of this museum was a series of colored glass panes dating to 1891, but with scenes from the 17th century coin making process. I've included them all below, with my best translations of the inscriptions (please feel free to recommend improvements as my gothic German is especially poor). There are also multiple displays of medieval coins from Constance and the odd Batzen tucked in among other objects. The display of medieval coin dies is very nice, although the lighting could be improved for those who are interested in seeing the fine detail. Several of the dies had a slight convex curve to them, perhaps to aid in coin removal following striking.

As a bonus to visiting this museum is access to the vast accumulation of stones, mosses, fossils, and artifacts. I have included a pic of some spearheads for @bobL as his collecting has recently gone in the direction of Parthian spearheads http://goccf.com/t/332703).

Lastly, I've included images of my oldest coin minted in the German Free City of Constance. It is a Batzen that was struck between 1499 and 1533 AD and is attributed as Saurma 1614.



1: Blank casting and [kuernen?]


2: Silver stretching


3: [weylan?]


4: Cutting out and flattening


5: [Aunk?] measuring the [Staff] airtank 16__


6:Test in the fire and on the balance


7: No inscription, but clearly this is a scene showing the dissemination of the finished coins.



Bronze spear heads:



Dies for striking medieval coins:




A Batzen of Constance from my collection:




"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Edited by Spence
04/13/2019 2:37 pm
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 Posted 04/13/2019  3:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Kunsthaus Zuerich (Zurich Art Museum) has lots of works of art in the genres of gothic, impressionism, cubism, and concrete art with Swiss dada thrown in for good measure. It is largely devoid of anything numismatic, with the sole exception of one painting showing a boat filled with gold and silver coins. Sorry but I didn't write down the painter--feel free to let me know and I'll fix this post to give proper credit to the artist. Non-flash photography is allowed.


If you are in Zuerich and want your coin fix, the National Museum of Switzerland is about a half mile walk North from the Kunsthaus and much more fertile ground (as described in page #7 of this thread).


"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
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 Posted 04/14/2019  12:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Well done. Thank you for getting us all caught up.


Quote:
Seems like there ought to be a translation app that works off of pics (not text). Please let me know if anyone out there knows of a good one.
The Google Translate app will do OCR from the camera for certain languages, German being one.
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 Posted 04/14/2019  7:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Thank you for getting us all caught up.


Not yet, but at least now I'm down to single digits. I guess I go to a lot of museums or something.
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
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 Posted 04/14/2019  8:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Super descriptions.

There are so many interesting museums out there!
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 Posted 04/15/2019  05:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 1c5d7n5m to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
very interesting description Spence !

the stained glass window series are wonderful
tried to translate some of the missing words (kŁernen, bregen), which are not used anymore in modern German
they may be forgotten jargon from an old and forgotten craftmanship
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