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Walking Back In Time From 1600 To Antiquity By Decades (V2.0)

 
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 Posted 02/14/2018  05:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lots of great material from the 1380s and thanks @jospeh7420 for getting us started on the 1370s. Here is my Pfennig from the German Bishopric of Münster. It was issued under the authority of Bishop Potho von Potentstein between 1379 and 1381. The obv legend is "POTMONIS EPISCOPI" and the rev legend is "+NOMETA NOM S". Perhaps someone was still learning the difference between the letter M and the letter N? It is attributed as Ilisch XX-2.



"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
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 Posted 02/14/2018  06:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice! I am guessing the image is that of St. Paul who shows up on later coinage of Munster. In medieval Christian iconograph, Paul is often shown holding a sword in one hand and a book in the other, a reminder of his first and second vocations (he was a soldier before his conversion). He (and Peter)are also usually shown bald and with long beards, as they were know to have lived into old age.
I'm not so familiar with all the places where Paul shows up on coins, but that's one of the nicest representations I've seen that early.
Edited by tdziemia
02/14/2018 06:41 am
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 Posted 02/15/2018  05:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks @tdziema! Yep that is St. Paul.

Here is a Cruzado from Spain that was issued under the authority of King Enrique II between 1369 and 1379 AD. The obv legend is "ENRICVS REX LEGINOIS" and the rev legend is "ENRICVS REX CASTELL" with E N R I in the quarters of the cross. I have it attributed as C&C 1296.



"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
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 Posted 02/15/2018  08:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I am posting this one and asking for feedback on the date range. Same type as posted for the 1380s by petrus, double gros of Louis de Male, Gaill. 223. Same legends though the punctuation on reverse is different (mine has something like a leaf or tree between words on the inner legend, rather than the clover of petrus' example unless this is just wear, and tripe dots punctuating the outer legend). I have a date range of 1365-67 and Ghent mint, but don't know the source for that.



Edited by tdziemia
02/15/2018 08:26 am
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 Posted 02/15/2018  09:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add antwerpen2306 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have the same problem . If you don t have the good catalogue , you are in problems .
I found the reference catalogue Gaillard on the net :

The coin in question , nr 223 on page 176 , https://lib.ugent.be/en/catalog/rug01:000219391 . You can download it without to sign in .
Here my coin . albert

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 Posted 02/15/2018  5:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks very much, albert.

From the reference you posted, it looks like mine is indeed Gaillard 223 (words in exterior legends separated by three dots, and the interior legend by branches) and yours is 224? (interior legend has trefoils)

If mine is from Ghent, then the correct date is 1373-77 (p.166).

Many thanks (even if it means my post is wrong by one day).
Edited by tdziemia
02/15/2018 8:37 pm
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 Posted 02/16/2018  05:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great discussion of some beautiful silver coins of medieval Netherlands and I'm glad that you are figuring out what you have!

Sliding back a decade to the 1350s today, I thought I would post our first AH dated coin on this thread. Here is a Dirham from the Mongol Empire/Golden Horde dated AH 758 (1357 AD). It was minted under the authority of the Khan Birdi Beg in Saray al-Jadida and is attributed as Album A-2031.2.



"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
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 Posted 02/16/2018  07:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
We may have had one AH date way upthread?

Anyhow, I am back to Brabant (no surprise ) with this mouton d'or from the reign of Joanna and Wenceslas with a date range 1357-1366 Witte 387 (according to Ghyssens, they were minted in Vilvoorde in 1357, 1363 and 1366).
Obv: AGN DEI QVI TOLL PCCA MVDI MISERERE NOB and IOh DUX below the lamb
Rev: XPC VINCIT XPC REGNAT XPC IMPERAT

While medieval European coins often have a mix of symbols of civic and religious authority on them, this one strikes me in terms of its religious content. Those familiar with the Christian mass/service will recognize the obverse legend as part of that rite: "Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us." The reverse translates as "Christ conquered, Christ reigns, Christ commands." I wonder if this was a response to the horrors of the Black Death which arrived in the Low countries in 1349, killed about half the population between 1349 and 1351,and led to lasting economic and social upheaval for decades?



Edited by tdziemia
02/16/2018 08:32 am
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 Posted 02/16/2018  07:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
We might still be stuck at the 1360s. One of the two coins posted for that decade had a minting period of slightly over 10 years (about 10.2 years by my estimate), and the other one turned out to be from a decade later.

I'll check if my own 14th century coins are from the right decade...
...nope, 1323, 1342-1357, and 1346-1378.
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 Posted 02/16/2018  08:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Yes, I learned mine was definitely from the 1370s.

As for 10 years vs. 10.2 years
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 Posted 02/16/2018  7:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
10 years vs. 10.2 years


Good catch @J1M and I appreciate your attention to detail, but we are going to use standard rounding rules on this thread, so 10.2 years is still a decade.

Edit: @tdziemia, that sheep is really well engraved--congrats on owning such an impressive coin. As to your question of increased religiosity following times of the plague, I think that there may very well be a connection.
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Edited by Spence
02/16/2018 7:23 pm
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 Posted 02/17/2018  05:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I will start off the 1340s with this plaque from Lorraine, attributed as Boudeau 1467. While I see this coin listed elsewhere with a date range 1346-52, de Saulcy gives 1346-1348. It is issued during the regency of Marie of Blois for her young son, the future Duke Jean I of Lorraine.

The history of the 100 Years War links this coin
to the double groat of Loedewijk of Flanders which we saw from the 1370s/1380s. The first major victory for the English was the Battle of Crecy, August 26, 1346. Fighting on the French side, Loedewijk's father (Count Louis I of Flanders) was killed in battle, as was Marie's husband, Duke Raoul of Lorraine, and her brother Count Louis II of Blois.

Obv: IOHANNES DVX MARCHIO DE LOTHORIGIA
Rev: MARIE DVCHESS MANBOVRS DE LA DVCHI and interior legend MONETA DE NACEI (other variations of reverse legend exist)



Edited by tdziemia
02/17/2018 05:59 am
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 Posted 02/17/2018  07:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another impressive silver @tdziemia!

Here is a Carrarino da 2 Soldi from the Italian City State of Padova. It dates to between 1345 and 1350 AD and the obv inscription is "CIVIT+PAD" with I / A in the upper quarters of the cross. The rev inscription is "+S+PSDO CIMUS" and the attribution is Biaggi 1729.



"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Edited by Spence
02/17/2018 08:04 am
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 Posted 02/17/2018  07:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Really attractive coin in lovely condition! Saint Prosdocimo was the first bishop of Padova, died around 100 A.D., and hence was a sort of "first generation" after the original apostles. One of the patron saints of Padova. Curious if this denomination is larger than a grosso?

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 Posted 02/17/2018  08:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks @tdziemia! Under Jacob II of Carrara, this was the largest silver coin produced (although to be fair, there were only two and the other was a Denaro Piccolo). My coin is about 19 mm in diameter.
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
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