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1964 Quarter Weighing 6.16 Grams, On Clad Planchet?

 
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 Posted 03/03/2018  03:43 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add sosicoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi, everyone. I found a 1964 quarter that weighed 6.16 grams. The actual weight for this year should be 6.25 grams. I had someone checked on the coin. I received the information that the coin was plated. Does this mean the coin is on a clad planchet? What will I do with this coin?








Noted DDO on date (1964), is it possible for a repunch on the designer's initials?
Pictures not downloaded: DDO/DDR on devices/letterings. My apologies...I have not done an upgrade on my camera...pix not sharp...Hopefully sometime in the future.


Noted DDR on eagle's image.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  03:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Fuzzy317 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A 40% silver clad quarter should weigh 5.7 grams, and a modern clad quarter should weigh 5.67 grams.

The reverse rim above STATES looks like it might be worn, so that may account for the slightly lower that 6.3 (6.25) grams of a 90% silver quarter, and that may not even consider the tolerances in weight of the blanks.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  09:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Someone here will know the tolerances.



to the CCF!
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United States
8715 Posts
 Posted 03/03/2018  10:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SilverDollar2017 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think the tolerance for a silver quarter is 0.195 grams, or 3 grains.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  10:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You have a very slightly underweight silver quarter, still within tolerance weight. It is too heavy to be a clad coin. And why would you plate a 1964 copper nickel clad quarter? Look a 1964 clad quarter worth thousands of dollars, quick let's silver plate it to hide that fact!
Gary Schmidt
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United States
393 Posts
 Posted 03/03/2018  12:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sosicoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the responses. Actually, I got curious from the videos which I like watchibg. These videos are from the youtube of BlueRidgeSilverHound. In one of his videos, he says to try weighing your coins, which I did to a lot of the coin rolls I got from the bank. I Found Nice, intereSting coins & was blessed to get hold of a Sacagawea dollar still rolled in Philadelphia mint paper roll. Curious with my weighing scale, I opened a Philadelphia 1964 mint set with the coin edges turning pink. I told myself, these coins will not be in good mint condition after few more years. So, it would not hurt to open & play with the mint set coins. It will be more knowledge & information for me. That was when I found about this quarter weighing 6.16 grams, Kennedy half dollar weighing 12.68 grams (should be 12.50 grams--- I gained 18 grams of 90% silver but the checker said this coin is also 'plated' lIke the quarter), dime weighs 2.55 grams ( another gain of 0.05 grams of 90% silver). I didn't ask for the dime to be checked. I will probably have this dime checked some time next week. The edges of the dime are also turning pink. That's the whole story of these Philadelphia 1964 coins. Thanks again.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  12:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sosicoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hi, Conder101. You gave me an idea. I will send the quarter from the mint set & have the TGP determine the authenticity of the coin. So, I can share to the coincommunity.com the results of how & why this coin turned out to be like it is. Did you notice the wing on the east side, looking at the reverse of the whole coin? To me, it looks like letters 'Rx' which stands for prescription from the medical community. When I tried to focus on it, I deciphered 'S'. As student of the hobby, I need to learn from teachers like you in the coincommunity.com. There's a lot to learn. Thanks again.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  12:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Why. The grading will probably exceed the value of the coin. You could do a simple tissue test to show it is silver. Take this coin and any clad coin and put a single layer of facial tissue over them. The silver coin will show whiter than that a clad coin.

Now you know it is silver. Save the expense.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 03/03/2018  1:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Brilliant as usual!
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United States
393 Posts
 Posted 03/03/2018  10:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sosicoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hi, kindly let me know if I am mistaken with my understanding. I thought plating is used by jewelers & cladding is a term used in coinage. Is it? Thanks, for more knowledge.
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 Posted 03/03/2018  10:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Plating probably started back on automobile use on bumpers. Some dishes are plated with silver instead of being made with silver. Plastic can be plated. when the copper planchets were stopped in 1982, they used plated zinc planchets with copper. Jewelry is plated. But cladding is usually though of on the coins post 1964. Silver was used that year, but a few were struck on cladding to test out to see if it will work on the coinage. Just a limited number of SMS (Special-Mint-Sets) were made with that type of planchet. These are very new planchets with just a few die scratches on them. They were testing out the new SMS sets instead of the proof coins on the 1965-1967 coins. In 1968 they returned to the proof sets. Your coin looks like a business strike silver coin which was common that year. But it is a nice one. (one that shouldn't just be melted for the silver)
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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United States
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 Posted 03/03/2018  10:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Rackster to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Plating is used across multiple industries for a variety of things (e.g., a sterling silver spoon vs. a silver plated spoon made from an inexpensive substrate). Clad coinage was created once the value of silver exceeded it's face value. By layering materials (nickel/copper/nickel), you can create a coin that has similar material value as the face value of the coin. Quarters, dimes, half dollars, etc. have used this approach for decades. Presently, the Lincoln Cent is a copper plated zinc planchet to keep material costs down.
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United States
393 Posts
 Posted 03/03/2018  11:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sosicoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Coop & Rackster.
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