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Kingdom Of Poland Coins By Century (963 - 1586)

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 Posted 09/26/2018  9:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I ask often myself why it is so difficult and expensive to find coins from Flanders or Brabant for this period ?


Hi, antwerpen.
I also collect early coins of Brabant, and I also ask myself this question of why some medieval principalities are more rare and expensive than others.
I think it comes down to supply and demand, both in the historical period, and in the present.

I am not as knowledgeable as other experts here on medieval coins, but from my limited experience, I would consider Cologne/Koln as a place where there is a good supply of 11th and 12th century coins at a modest price. The small number of Ottonian denars (11th c.) and bishop's coins (12th c.) I have bought or sold have been in the 50 - 75 euro range.
I have the impression that circa 1100 Cologne was a populous and wealthy place. So the number of coins issued was probably large.

By comparison, I think in the Low Countries, there was not yet as much wealth, nor as much coinage in 11th c. and beginning of the 12th. The coins of the dukes Godefroid in Brabant are indeed very rare and expensive. However, by the end of the 12th century the situation changes, and the deniers/denars become very affordable.

I am not an expert on the market for Polish coins, but based on my small purchases of the last 10 years, I think the bishops coinage is affordable (church more wealthy than the sovereigns and minting more coins?) and the royal coinage is more rare in this era. So, the bishops' denar I posted cost only $75 (60 eu) about 10 years ago. The royal coinage of Boleslaus II is much more expensive, with examples sold this year generally in the 200-400 euro range.

So, it is a complicated picture ...
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 Posted 09/26/2018  9:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Is there any reliable publication on this subject in English? I would love to find out!


As spence points out, Kopicki is in Polish (blech! and that's NOT a Polish word, although it could be), and Gumoowski is in German. I should be able to read Polish but cannot (as my Polish relatives are quick to remind me).

Possibly the best (albeit incomplete) reference in English are the auction catalogs for the Karolkiewicz collection, sold off via CNG.

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 Posted 09/27/2018  09:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add antwerpen2306 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks.albert
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 Posted 09/27/2018  9:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My last coin for week one is this denar of duke Wladyslaw Herman (1079-1102), who ascended the throne when his older brother Boleslaw was deposed and exiled to Hungary.

Obv: Bust of king left, LADISLAVS
Rev: Church. CRA(COV off planchet)
Kopicki 32, Gumowski 72.

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 Posted 09/27/2018  9:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Been lurking on this Ted-thread. Good stuff!
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 Posted 09/28/2018  08:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Bob.

Next week I expect we'll see some better struck coins (though still nothing like those medieval Hungarians we enjoy seeing out here).

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 Posted 09/28/2018  11:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As we turn the page from 10th and 11th century contributions to 12th and 13th, I will just comment that it's hardly surprising that we saw no contributions from the first three rulers.

A search on Coin Archives comes up empty for the first, Mieszko I.
For Boleslaw I (992-1025), 2018 auction prices were $2,000 (for a rather beat up denar), $5,000 $28,000 and $30,000.
For Mieszko II (1025-1031) $10,000 and $17,000.

So the beginning of the 12th century sees a struggle between the two sons of Wladyslaw Herman for control of the nation. Boleslaw III would win over his brother Zbigniew and rule as duke of all Poland from 1107-1138. His directive on splitting his realm amongst his sons led to a fragmentation of Poland that would not be resolved for nearly 200 years.

Time to post coins of the Polish kingdom from the 12th and 13th centuries.





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 Posted 09/29/2018  12:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...$2,000...$5,000...$28,000...$30,000...$10,000...$17,000.


OUCH!
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 Posted 09/29/2018  07:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
OUCH!

Indeed. Those kinds of prices pretty much ensure that my earliest Polish royal will remain the Boleslaw II denar I posted earlier. For anyone interested in acquiring a coin from 12th c. Poland, there are a half dozen Wladyslaw Herman denars in the upcoming Marciniak auction, with starting prices as low as 50 eu.

To start the 12th century, here is a denar of Boleslaw III.
Obverse: Bishop blessing a knight
Reverse: Small cross, legend is a bungled version of S ADALBERTUS (patron saint of Poland)
Kopicki 42, Gum. 79.
A comment on the symbolism of the obverse. Boleslaw waged war to conquer Pomerania for more than a decade, with support of the Polish church, as this part of Europe had not yet converted to Christianity.

Edited by tdziemia
09/29/2018 07:48 am
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 Posted 10/01/2018  10:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
IN his will, Boleslaw III established rules for assigning titles and lands to the next generation, in the hope of avoiding family territorial disputes. His eldest son, Wladyslaw II would be "High Duke," with the "Seignorate province" (a serpentine territory winding from the south to Gdansk), and the duchy of Silesia. The next two brothers were to be dukes of the two other major chunks of Polish territory.
Things unravelled rather quickly, and by 1146, Wladyslaw had been deposed and driven from the country (hence his nickname, Wladyslaw II Wygnaniec, or Ladislaus the Exile).
He minted a fair number of denars during his reign (I forgot to mention in some of the earlier discussions that Numista's Poland section is very well done, even back to medieval times)

Obverse: Knight or prince with sword and shield
Reverse: Bishop with staff and book
I cannot find an explanation for that looks like a legend near the rim on either side
Kopicki 51, Gumowski 86. Numista lists over 40 variants, though I'm not sure I see an exact match for this one (something like a mace over the knight's right shoulder, and reclining letter S over his left. Variety an looks closest).https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces124234.html


Edited by tdziemia
10/02/2018 06:25 am
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 Posted 10/03/2018  3:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
After chasing Wladyslaw from the country, his two younger stepbrothers divided Polish lands, with Boleslaw IV taking the lands held previously by Wladyslaw (Seniorate Province and Silesia), and Mieszko III taking Wielkopolska. Boleslaw IV would reign as High Duke until his death in 1173.

Boleslaw IV issued a number of types of denars (Kop. 54-64).
Obv: Duke on throne with sword on lap. BOLE Z L AVS
Rev: Reliquary of St. Adalbert. S. ADALBE-IUS
Kopicki 54a(?). Gumowski 88
Grateful if anyone can confirm the attribution of Kop. 54 vs. Kop. 55, which I have assigned based on info in Numista. Gumowski does not differentiate



Edited by tdziemia
10/03/2018 8:16 pm
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 Posted 10/03/2018  8:40 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Most of these coins I have not seen before, I am learning a lot from this thread.
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 Posted 10/03/2018  9:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks!
The better known crown/eagle designs appear later, in 1400s. Before that it's quite a variety of denars in a style something like the German city-states, then bracteates in the 1200s, again like Germany (I have nothing from an entire century, as the kingdom no longer exists in the 1200s, but is fragmented into smaller duchies).

For anyone who wants to see the full range, I will say again that the Numista contributors for Poland have done an extremely good job. You can go to the Numista country catalog, and click on Poland, Kingdom, and you get a menu by monarch back to these very early years.


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 Posted 10/03/2018  10:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Such a great thread, with much interesting information and wonderful coins. Well done, Ted. I'm enjoying the ride.
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 Posted 10/04/2018  06:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@tdz, I have a Praggroschen from the Polish City State of Bohemia that fits this week's timeframe and is listed in Kopicki. Is that in scope for this thread?
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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