Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Post Your Kingdom Of Poland Coins By Monarch 1587 - 1795

First page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 150 / Views: 11,629Next Topic
Page: of 10
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
18178 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2018  09:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here are a bunch more coppers issued by John Casimir, although the imperial eagle gives these solidi away as being from Poland rather than the previous batch from Lithuania. I have 1662 AD (Kopicki 1550), 1663 AD (Kopicki 1550), 1664 AD (Kopicki 1552), 1665 AD (Kopicki 1553), and 1666 AD (Kopicki 1554):















"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

Bedrock of the Community
United States
21767 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2018  09:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice group.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2018  10:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@gallienus, thanks for another super set of thalers!


Quote:
Earlier I saw in this thread some explanation of typical thaler weights, finenesses, and also how many denars / schillings were in a thaler. Unfortunately I can't find that exact post. If anyone could help I'd appreciate it.


On thaler weight and purity and the relation to smaller denominations, here is info pulled from various tables in Gumowski, p. 207-220.
On each line is some combination of Ruler & year/Thaler wt/Purity/Equivalent in groschen (always in that order, though not all the info for each entry).
Starting in 1700s it gets difficult as the groschen is no longer in silver.

Sigismund II Lithuania 1564 27.86 g, 73.4% = 30 Lith gro.
Stefan Bathory 1578...........28.24 g., 87.5% = 38 Groschen
Stefan Bathory 1580-1601...28.83 g., 84.4% = 36 Gr.
and Sigismund III
Sigismund III 1608..................................= 40 Gr.
Sigismund III 1620..................................= 60 Gr.
Sigismund III 1622..................................= 80 Gr.
Sigismund III 1628..................................= 90 Gr.
Jan Casimir 1650.............28.8 g., 87.5%
Jan Casimire 1668..................................= 108 Gr.
Jan Sobieski Danzig 1685....29.46 g., 87.5%
Monetary reform of 1717 1 Thaler = 8 Gulden = 240 Gr(Cu)
Augustus III 1752-63..........29.23 g., 80%
Stanislaw AUgust 1766.......28.06 g., 83.3%
Stanislaw AUgust 1794.......24.10 g., 68.9%
Edited by tdziemia
12/01/2018 11:07 am
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2018  11:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@spence, that's a nice run of copper schillings! I was just looking at a lot on the WAGO auction that has one of these.

And I am very late on commenting on a number of @giedrius' posts, and wondering if there is another book coming on varieties/errors in 17th c. silver Lithuanian schillings?
Edited by tdziemia
12/01/2018 11:18 am
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2018  11:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As mentioned upthread, the abdication of Jan Casimir in 1668 marked the end of the Swedish Vasa dynasty. The Polish-Lithuanian parliament next elected Michael Korybut Wisniowiecki, the son of a powerful Polish noble. His reign would be short, as he died at the age of 33 in 1673.

From a political viewpoint, his reign was marked by squabbling between pro-Hapsburg and pro-French factions in the nobility, and the invasion of Poland by the combined forces of the Ottoman Empire and Cossacks in 1672.

From a numismatic viewpoint, the only accessible coins of MIchel Korybut produced were schillings (Gdansk 1670, Torun 1671, Elbing 1671-73). Other than these, there are rare ducats and double ducats.

He was succeeded by Jan Sobieski, a military leader who, after initial losses, began to successfully repel the invasion in the southeast, starting from 1673, and would eventually gain renown leading the army that repulsed the Ottomans at Vienna in 1683.

... and who left a much richer numismatic legacy than his predecessor
Edited by tdziemia
12/01/2018 5:43 pm
Valued Member
Lithuania
363 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  03:56 am  Show Profile   Check giedrius's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add giedrius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@tdziemia „wondering if there is another book coming on varieties/errors in 17th c. silver Lithuanian schillings?" Thank You! Who knows....but our next issue will be the second edition of „Early Lithuanian Half-groats 1495-1529" in year or two or maybe a book about all the Lithuanian coinage of Alexander Jagiellon and Sigismund the Old. Working on it.
Catalogue of Lithuanian half-groats 1495-1529 http://goccf.com/t/282866
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  07:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Please continue to post any remaining coins of Jan Casimir, or other related coins (as we have seen, there were occupation coins under Swedish authority ... maybe some others?) as we move to the next reign.

I will start with this 1683 szostak/sechsgroschen of Jan Sobieski, the year of the Battle of Vienna. Bydgoszcz mint, Kop. 1963.

Edited by tdziemia
12/02/2018 07:10 am
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4560 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  07:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add scopru to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice addition tdziemia
Member: ANA and NGC
My Want list: http://goccf.com/t/188411
Pillar of the Community
Russian Federation
3307 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  07:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
as we have seen, there were occupation coins under Swedish authority ... maybe some others?
I think this nice(-ish) Swedish Livonian solidus from 1645 might well have been one of the first 17th century coins in my collection...



Livonia under Swedish occupation, Christina, solidus, 1645.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I would call that a VERY nice one

IN the other thread, there was a comment on Livonia, and how in the 1560s (I think), a portion came under Polish control. When Sigismund III finally made peace with Sweden in 1629, he had lost Livonia. Sweden would rule it until the early 1700s when it came under Russian rule.

(You probably know this history better than I do!)
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
18178 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  1:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice solidus @J1M!

And @tdz, I recognize that Sechsgroschen. Here are a few more from that same decade for Johann III Sobieski. The first was minted in 1681 AD and is attributed as Kopicki 1953. The second was minted in 1682 AD and is attributed as Kopicki 1957. The third was minted in 1684 AD and is attributed as Kopicki 1968.












All three of my coins suffer from a somewhat weak strike on the center of the obv that mostly affects the king's mouth and chin. Perhaps the rev die was sunk a bit deeply and therefore the thin flans didn't have enough metal to adequately fill out the obv? Or was this a bit of subtle political commentary by the die sinker at Bydgoszcz?
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  1:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice run of those sechsgroschen. I'm assuming the 1682 looks as nice in hand as in the photos.

Looking through other examples (the WCN search function I learned from @giedrius), I agree that the weak strike is characteristic of this type. Also, whatever is causing the black pitting recurs with a lot of these. I am guessing that's a defect in the metal from which the planchets were cut, given that it has a directionality to it.

As for the political commentary, maybe it would have been appropriate for Jan Casimir, but I think this guy was a pretty tough dude ... I'm thinking he was something like the Polish equivalent of Ike (military hero who became a political leader as well).

When I got mine, (probably a dozen years ago), I didn't know that was a relatively well struck example. Now I realize I was lucky to get it (OK ... I also paid for some of that "luck").
Edited by tdziemia
12/02/2018 2:09 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
18178 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  3:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I agree that the weak strike is characteristic of this type.


Here is another example of the "chinless" portrait, also from 1682 AD:




"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2162 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2018  3:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting thread!
Not my area of collecting but just to let you know I've been following and learning..Thanks....Paul
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4158 Posts
 Posted 12/09/2018  11:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is my last 17th century coin, a 1677 Ort of Jan Sobieski. I think it came from my LCS many years ago, and I have never gotten the Kopicki attribution, though a quick look at recent auction sales says there are at least three possibilities for 1677 orts with the concave sided shield: Kop. 1979, 1980, 1986. Will need to sort it out later. (Edit: Kop. 1980 is my best guess)

In the meantime, let's also move on to our next ruler, and our next century!

Edited by tdziemia
12/10/2018 12:16 pm
Page: of 10 Previous TopicReplies: 150 / Views: 11,629Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.88 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05