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Post A Coin Or Medal Devoted To A Military Subject

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 Posted 04/22/2021  07:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wannabfree to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have always been hesitant to post this Civil War Token, simply because of it's poor condition and appearance, but when considering it this morning for this military thread, I decided to go for it simply because it has likely been exposed to mud, the smell of burning black powder and , extreme weather conditions etc..
Comparing these situations to all the gorgeous shiny gold and silver coins that have only been subjected to being coined, slabbed into a plastic case, then displayed under glass, I reconsidered.
This token, a well worn, likely abused 1857 metal coin with the inscription `First in War . First in Peace'.

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 Posted 04/22/2021  10:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
1936 Battle of Gettysburg Half Dollar
Excellent example!


Quote:
I have always been hesitant to post this Civil War Token, simply because of it's poor condition and appearance, but when considering it this morning for this military thread, I decided to go for it simply because it has likely been exposed to mud, the smell of burning black powder and , extreme weather conditions etc...
We are glad you did! A nice piece which did its job.
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 Posted 04/22/2021  11:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...1857 metal coin...

Are you sure about the "1857" date on your token? Could it be a damaged "1863"?

For a variety of reasons, a date of "1857" doesn't seem correct.

Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/22/2021  4:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wannabfree to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Quote:
Are you sure about the "1857" date on your token? Could it be a damaged "1863"?


No, commems. I am not sure of the date. I locked that coin in my desk earlier today, and will definitely check it 1st thing in the morning. Thanks for pointing out the possibility of the error.
Dave
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 Posted 04/22/2021  7:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1937 Battle of Antietam half dollar is the second of three commemorative coins issued in recognition of the US Civil War.

The coin marks the bloodiest single day of the Civil War -- 17 September 1862. During the battle, the first major battle on Union soil, it is estimated that over 23,000 soldiers were either killed (~3,600) or wounded (~20,000). The battle took place in Washington County, MD, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg. MD and Antietam Creek.

The obverse of the coin features the conjoined portraits of Union Major General George McClellan (the portrait at the left rear) and Confederate General Robert E. Lee. McClellan commanded the Union's Army of the Potomac in the battle; Lee headed the opposing Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. The reverse of the coin depicts a serene scene of the stone bridge over Antietam Creek. The strategic bridge saw significant fighting during the battle and was the scene of ~500 Union casualties and ~100 Confederate casualties. It was named Lower Bridge at the time of the battle, but later came to be known as Burnside's Bridge.

The battle for control of the bridge lasted approximately three hours, with Confederate forces defending it and repelling multiple attacks by the Union Army's IX Corps under General Ambrose Burnside. The bridge was finally overrun and secured by Union troops via a brigade under the direct command of Brigadier General Edward Ferrero (part of Burnside's troops). The Union's capture of the bridge forced the Confederate troops to begin their eventual retreat to Virginia.

While the overall battle is considered inconclusive in terms of winner/loser, it did stop Lee's advance into Maryland and gave the Union enough of a strategic victory to empower US President Abraham Lincoln to declare his Emancipation Proclamation which was a promise to free the slaves throughout the Confederacy; Lincoln issued the Proclamation on September 22, 1862. (For more on the Emancipation Proclamation, check out this article on the National Archives web site: The Emancipation Proclamation.)

The Battle of Antietam is acknowledged as a key moment in the US Civil War, one with far-reaching ramifications. For a great summary, I suggest checking out: American Battlefield Trust: Antietam.


1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary Half Dollar



You can read more about the coin here:

- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Revisited
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - A Look At Its Stars
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Coins with Beards Thread
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Coins Depicting Places Thread


For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, see: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/22/2021  7:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Thanks for pointing out the possibility of the error.

I'm sorry if I've upset you with my date query. I don't apologize for raising the question, but I'm sorry if it bothered you. I believe we should all do our best to present accurate information here on CCF. When I've been corrected in the past, I believe the value of the posts was improved by the added accuracy.

I questioned the date because the token you presented is a well-known and cataloged token from 1863. I wasn't aware of, and couldn't find a reference to, an 1857 variety. One with a date four years before the start of the Civil War would definitely be something different!

I look forward to reading what you've learned after you've had a chance to examine it again.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/23/2021  07:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wannabfree to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I'm sorry if I've upset you with my date query.

commens
I was not upset at your query in the least. I, in fact, respect and fully appreciate any corrections. The only BAD question is the one not asked. I looked this morning under my micky-mouse magnifier and can confirm the date as a definite 1863 coin.

Please do not ever hesitate to point out what you believe to be true.

Just because you have brought an old man near to tears is no reason to let up. I am now going to have to confess to my grandchildren that I may have made my 1st mistteak,EVER !
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 Posted 04/23/2021  08:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Just because you have brought an old man near to tears is no reason to let up. I am now going to have to confess to my grandchildren that I may have made my 1st mistteak,EVER !

Break it to them gently, they'll eventually get over it and be OK!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
04/23/2021 08:28 am
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 Posted 04/23/2021  08:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The final (third of three) Civil War-themed classic US commemorative coin is the 1925 Stone Mountain half dollar. The coin was issued "in commemoration of the commencement on June 18, 1923, of the work of carving on Stone Mountain, in the State of Georgia, a monument to the valor of the soldiers of the South...and in memory of Warren G. Harding, President of the United States of America, in whose administration the work was begun." (Public Law 68-46).

The obverse of the half dollar features General Robert E. Lee and General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson of the Confederate Army. Both are shown on horseback, moving left, at the front of what the viewer is to imagine is a long procession of Confederate officers and soldiers. This grander scope was originally envisioned for the monument as well as the coin, but each saw reductions in its design objectives due to its own novel constraints. (You can read more about such limitations via the links below.)

Lee is the forward of the two figures and is captured in a side profile; Jackson is depicted in the rear turned to face Lee (i.e., forward).

The coins were used by the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association of Atlanta as a fund raiser to support the mountain's carving. More than 2.3 million of the coins were struck by the US Mint, but 1.0 million unsold coins were ultimately returned to the Mint to be melted. The net mintage/sales of ~1.3 million coins, though substantial, were not enough to complete the planned Stone Mountain Memorial carving and construction; work essentially ceased in 1928. It was not until the State of Georgia stepped in and took over the project decades later (late 1950s) that it was completed (in 1970).

1925 Stone Mountail Memorial Half Dollar





I've made multiple posts about the Stone Mountain half dollar, you can check them out here:

- 1925 Stone Mountain Memorial
- 1925 Stone Mountain Memorial - Revisited
- 1925 Stone Mountain Memorial - Revisited #2
- 1925 Stone Mountain Memorial - Revisited #3
- 1925 Stone Mountain Memorial - Seeing Stars
- Harding and the Stone Mountain Memorial
- 1970 Stone Mountain Medal in PNC
- 1925 Stone Mountain - Coins with Beards Thread
- 1925 Stone Mountain - Coins Depicting Places Thread


More about the Stone Mountain half dollar, as well as about other commemorative coins and medals, can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/23/2021  7:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2003 Brazil
10 Centavos Pedro I


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 Posted 04/24/2021  10:28 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1927 Battle of Bennington / Vermont Independence Sesquicentennial half dollar was issued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Bennington and the Independence of Vermont.

The Battle of Bennington resulted from the lines of British General John Burgoyne being stretched too thin as he advanced with his troops south from Canada into Vermont with an objective of separating the New England colonies from the rest and thus creating a more manageable/winnable war. As he progressed, he realized he needed to secure supplies from local sources.

One such source was determined to be Bennington, VT. Burgoyne sent part of his troops, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Friedrich Baum, to secure what was needed. Baum's troops built a makeshift fortification on a hill near Bennington in Walloomsac, NY. Baum's men were attacked by over 1,000 American militia on August 16, 1777; the Americans were under the command of General John Stark who had been joined by the troops of Colonel Seth Warner. The Americans prevailed and captured more than 700 British troops; Baum was mortally wounded during the battle and died on August 18, 1777.

The Battle of Bennington was a precursor to the American victory at Saratoga, once again, over troops commanded by British General Burgoyne. The victory at Saratoga was a pivotal moment in the American Revolutionary War.

For some great information on the Battle of Bennington, and other American Revolution topics, I recommend a visit to the web site of the American Battlefield Trust. Here's a link to its page on the Battle of Benington: Battle of Bennington.


1927 Battle of Bennington / Vermont Independence Sesquicentennial Half Dollar


To learn more about the Bennington/Vermont coin, check out:

- 1927 Bennington-Vermont Sesquicentennial
- 1927 Bennington-Vermont Sesquicentennial - Cousin
- What if? Gold $1 for Bennington-Vermont Sesquicentennial


Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/25/2021  11:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1925 Lexington-Concord half dollar was another coin from the classic US commemorative series that was struck to recall a battle of the American Revolution. The coin was issued to commemorate the sesquicentennial (150th) anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

As its name implies, the Battle was comprised of two separate, but related, actions - one in Lexington and one in nearby Concord. Together, they represented the first defined battle of the War for American Independence, with a semi-organized, volunteer local militia (aka Minutemen) going up against well-trained, professional British Army troops. The Battle is remembered also as the source of the famous quote, "The Shot Heard 'Round the World!"

Fully describing the Battle and the events of April 19, 1775 are beyond my scope here, so I recommend paying a visit to the web site of the American Battlefield Trust for a discussion of multiple aspects of the Battle. You can start with a good summary of the Battle here: Battle of Lexington and Concord.

The coin's obverse depicts the "Minute Man" statue sculpted by Daniel Chester French and erected in Concord in time for the 1875 centennial commemoration of the Battle. The reverse of the coin depicts the Belfry Tower in Lexington in which hung the bell that sounded the alarm on April 19, 1775 and alerted the local militia (i.e., Minutemen) of the advancing British troops and the need to assemble.

1925 Lexington-Concord Half Dollar




To learn more about the Lexington half dollar, see:

- 1925 Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial
- 1925 Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial - Ephemera
- 1925 Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial - Coins with Hats (features full color image of Minute Man statue)
- 1925 Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial - Coins with Agriculture Theme


For other of my posts on commemorative coins and medals, see: Read More: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/25/2021  11:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1986 Greece.
2 Drachmes new lettering.




Obverse

The portrait in left profile of Georgios Karaiskakis (1782-1827), a famous Greek klepht, armatolos, military commander, and a hero of the Greek War of Independence

Lettering: ΓΕΩΡΓΙΟΣ ΚΑΡΑΙΣΚΑΚΗΣ
Translation: GEORGIOS KARAISKAKIS
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 Posted 04/26/2021  09:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1934-38 Texas Independence Centennial half dollar generates its military theme link via the inclusion of the Alamo mission/garrison as part of its reverse design, along with the small portraits of General Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin - plus the fact that Texas' independence came about as a result of armed conflict between the volunteer army of Texas and the professional Mexican Army.

The Texans (actually, Texians and Tejanos) lost their fight at the Alamo to the troops of Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna - he was also serving as the Mexican President. The "Take no prisoners!" policy of Santa Anna and the execution of the small number of survivors remaining in the aftermath of his siege of the Alamo led to the Texans becoming even more focused on winning their independence from Mexico. His behavior served as motivation for the Texans in their battle against Santa Anna at San Jacinto on April 21, 1836 - a battle won by the Texans! "Remember the Alamo!" was a rallying cry during the battle. San Jacinto proved to be the decisive battle of the war and led Texas to formally declare its independence from Mexico and to form the Republic of Texas.

The forces at San Jacinto were under command of General Sam Houston; Houston was, in fact, in charge of the entire Texas Army - he would also go on to be the first President of the independent Republic of Texas. Austin, who served briefly as the first General of the Texas Army, served more of a diplomatic role during the conflict after being replaced by Houston. He went to Washington to prepare for a future relationship with the United States, he recruited soldiers to fight for the Texas cause and he arranged for weapons and supplies.

So, though many collectors assume the half dollar commemorates the centennial of Texas' statehood, it actually marks its launch as the independent Republic of Texas after a military battle with Mexico. Texas' statehood would come later, in December 1845.

1934-38 Texas Independence Centennial Half Dollar





If you'd like to learn more about the Texas half dollar, check out:

- 1935 Texas Independence Centennial
- Texas Centennial - There Could Have Been Five!
- Texas Independence Centennial - Post Your Coin Depicting Places Thread
- Texas Independence Centennial - Post Your Coins with Hats Thread
- Texas Independence Centennial - Post Your Coins Depicting Mythology Thread

I also have other commemorative coin and medal posts that can be found at: Read More: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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