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1891 Ld With Repunched N?

 
 
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Pillar of the Community
Canada
1626 Posts
 Posted 01/06/2019  5:50 pm Show Profile   Check gidjit's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add gidjit to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
i think I finally found the coin from page 328 of Charltons 65th,please confirm thanks

please check out my collection of large cents from 1858 - 1920 (under construction)
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/...l=4b87156114
Pillar of the Community
New Zealand
1430 Posts
 Posted 01/06/2019  7:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fourmack to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looking GOOD
very nice find
Cheers Don

Vickies cents and GB Farthings nut.
"Old" is a figure of speech and nothing more
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1386 Posts
 Posted 01/06/2019  8:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add papeldog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Right on not an easy coin to find
Pillar of the Community
United States
2426 Posts
 Posted 01/06/2019  8:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add okiecoiner to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Congrats .. a very tough coin to find and much scarcer than the 1892 Obv 2 R/E N.
Pillar of the Community
United States
664 Posts
 Posted 01/06/2019  10:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Phil310 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice one gidjit! The die crack at N of CANADA is a good marker for the late state of that die.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Canada
8881 Posts
 Posted 01/07/2019  02:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin!
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1262 Posts
 Posted 01/07/2019  7:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Can someone tell me what I'm looking for here? I can't see a repunched?
Pillar of the Community
New Zealand
1430 Posts
 Posted 01/07/2019  7:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fourmack to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
the foot of the N in REGINA normally only bits or thick as
Cheers Don

Vickies cents and GB Farthings nut.
"Old" is a figure of speech and nothing more
Pillar of the Community
United States
2426 Posts
 Posted 01/07/2019  9:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add okiecoiner to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The left lower foot of the serif on the N in Regina was broken off the hub (that makes/punches the working dies). On 2 of the working dies for the '81 LD/LL Obv 2's, the mintmaster had them repunch the N so that there was a full foot serif. The Obv dies for '91 probably struck about 50-60,000 coins, so any you find are pretty scarce. The same thing holds true for 1892, where 3 of the working dies were also handpunched to make a full-footed N.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1262 Posts
 Posted 01/08/2019  12:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's really interesting, I notice in world coins and US, these sorts of varieties mean very little value wise. What sort of value may I ask would be attributed to this sort of coin or is it more of an interest in following die states?
Pillar of the Community
United States
2426 Posts
 Posted 01/08/2019  06:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add okiecoiner to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It is a variety, not an error and they are, at least for 19th century coinage, quite well sought after here in Canada. Some of the scarcer ones may have a 40-50X premium on them, especially early large cents, particularly the 1858's and '59's. You can have a relatively normal coin that is $5 in VF-20 and the variety makes it a $250 coin. The reverse dies had a very short striking life, some maybe only 5,000 coins or less, and all the working dies had handpunched corrections made to them, resulting in large offset doubling, especially on the dates. Easily seen repunches on the Obverse, where a chipped/broken hub fails to make a good working die will usually have a premium of 10X or less. As for die states, very little premium ever occurs and probably reduces, rather than increase, the price. Die cracks, unless spectacular mean nothing, except to a true die tracker.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1262 Posts
 Posted 01/08/2019  7:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's quite interesting I would have thought each die would struck maybe 50-100k - was 5000 strikes what most mints were getting at the time?
Pillar of the Community
United States
2426 Posts
 Posted 01/08/2019  8:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add okiecoiner to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Most earlier Vicky Reverse working dies after 1859 got 50-70,000 strikes maybe some close to 100, but some broke very early. The Obverse dies lasted much longer. The 5,000 I was talking about were some (a few) '58's and '59's.... some very scarce. But I think the 58-59 Reverse dies probably averaged around 35-40,00 strikes, even with repunching some D/C's and letters/digits. The 58 & 58's were 1/3 thinner than a Brit halfpenny with the same diameter. By 1876, the cents were back to the same thickness as a Brit hapenny
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1262 Posts
 Posted 01/08/2019  9:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Did the thinness of the blank have a negative effect on the earlier dies?
Pillar of the Community
United States
2426 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2019  05:39 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add okiecoiner to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, the thinness of the new Canadian cent caused all kinds of problems for the London mint. They used the same presses, pressures, and mechanics that they used for the Brit halfpennies. The halfpenny was all copper and the Canadian cent was bronze, a harder metal that ate up the dies when used on the thinner material. You were striking a 1/3 thinner planchet (less metal to absorb the whack), through a harder planchet and with a much more intricate design, especially on the Reverse. Each leaf tip, serif, denticle and bead is an incuse (recessed) part of the die and they form a stress concentration point ... and that's where the cracks start. Just look at a large cent and see how much/many recessed area that there would be on a working die and how narrow the fields would be between the denticles, beads and serif to denticle distance.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1262 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2019  10:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks a lot very informative, yes I suppose the depth and detail is quite intricate compared to other coins of the time. That's really interesting thank you for that!
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