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1917 UK One Penny , Opinions Please.

 
 
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Canada
7609 Posts
 Posted 02/11/2019  4:26 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi Guys
What do you think about this coin
(Die clash ?)
Thanks in advance.



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United Kingdom
1334 Posts
 Posted 02/11/2019  4:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add peter1234 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It is called ghosting.
Best to google it.
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United States
34330 Posts
 Posted 02/11/2019  4:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Actually, just enter "ghosting" in the search box at the top left of this page.
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Australia
13057 Posts
 Posted 02/11/2019  5:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ghosting often happens when a relatively large, thin coin with a high relief design is struck on a relatively tough metal (like bronze) using a modern high pressure, high-speed coining press. It is very commonly seen on British pennies of Edward VII and the early part of the reign of George V, though can also be commonly seen on other large, thin bronze coins of the same time period (such as French 10 centimes). They actually did a redesign of the portrait of George V in the 1920s, to try to minimize the amount of ghosting seen on the resultant coins. Which worked; coins dating from after the final portrait change (1928 I believe) show the phenomenon far less frequently.

Ghosting is not considered a "mint error", as the "defect" is in the design of the coin itself (too large, too thin, too high relief) rather than a specific failure of the manufacturing process. Since most coins of a given date exhibit the phenomenon to a greater or lesser extent, it does not carry a premium; if anything, it is the ghost-free examples which cost more.

Ghosting can be distinguished from a die clash in that a die clash has a very sharply defined boundary, whereas a ghost is much blurrier.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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Canada
7609 Posts
 Posted 02/13/2019  11:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Ghosting can be distinguished from a die clash in that a die clash has a very sharply defined boundary, whereas a ghost is much blurrier.


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