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Pride Of Two Nations Set

 
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Valued Member
United States
493 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  09:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Big-Kingdom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm curious if there might be a variety in these like the 2008W with the 2007 reverse though.
Unlikely but, with a 110K mintage if there is that variety would change things up considerably for values depending on the minting ratios.
Valued Member
United States
125 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  12:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I'm curious if there might be a variety in these

Anyone spot a light finish?
Pillar of the Community
United States
588 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  1:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add RPT to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Got my set today. Both coins look flawless but I have a small scuff on top of the inner box.
Valued Member
United States
125 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  1:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I had a few with scuffs. A little rubbing and they went away.

If I were to submit these for grading, should I just mail in the coins in their capsules only, or would I need to send in the entire OGP? I've already opened them, so set designation isn't possible.
Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  2:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add historicantiques to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Bret: How about the 2011 P or S (Reverse Proof and Burnished)? With 100,000 minted for each, their prices are hovering around $250-$300 apiece. I may be wrong, but I can't help but think the Pride of Two Nations ASE will approach those prices. It's too beautiful and relatively rare, not to.

I guess only time will tell...
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1265 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  3:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is a very valid comparison. I'm always amazed at what the 1995-W proof goes for and it's just a regular proof with a 30k+ mintage. It's nothing special except that it's the key to the series.
Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  3:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add historicantiques to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Bret: It sure is key - between $3,000 - $4,000 apiece !!

Rarity, metal content, and beauty levels - they all have a hand in creating demand, some with more effects on prices than the others.

Although the Pride of Two Nations ASE isn't as rare as the 1995-W proof, its exceptional and rare beauty may make up a little for its higher mintage. At least I hope for our sake! Maybe $250-$350 within a few years, especially when people start realizing how beautiful it really is!
Valued Member
United States
75 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  3:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add dave92029 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Although the Pride of Two Nations ASE isn't as rare as the 1995-W proof, its exceptional and rare beauty may make up a little for its higher mintage. At least I hope for our sake! Maybe $250-$350 within a few years, especially when people start realizing how beautiful it really is!


When you guys are talking about "rare" isn't the Canadian Version of the Pride Sets the Rarest of them all with only 10,000 minted?

The grading companies are both indicating that they will be giving the Pride Sets properly submitted special designations that include the Mint of Origin, and special Registry tracking. Doesn't that make it Official?

That means the ASE series has a New Key IMHO.
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1020 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add BadDog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
That means the ASE series has a New Key IMHO.

Only if you collect labels and not coins.

The coin will have a mintage of 110,000 which I believe makes it the 5th lowest mintage after the 1995-W Proof (which is the key date), 2008-W Burnished rev of 2007, 2011-S Burnished and the 2011-P Rev Proof.
Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add historicantiques to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

dave92029: I guess I'm from the old school, but for me, whether the coins were issued from Canada or the U.S., they are still the exact same coins. The 10,000 sets sold in Canada are exactly the same as the 100,000 sets sold in the U.S.

The only difference is packaging. If people want to pay for the rarity of packaging and its certifications, that's fine. If there's a market, why not?

But then we stray from the essence and concept of coin collecting. Whether a U.S. MS-65 1804 silver dollar comes from Canada to a NYC auction, or from Boston, it really doesn't matter, does it?

I have a feeling that 50 or 100+ years from now, the most important aspect of ASE coins will be not where they were sold (packaging), but will be their conditions, mintages, metal contents, and eye-appeal (beauty). Traditional pillars of coin values.

The same thing goes for "Early Release" or "First Day" certifications. Not sure what's so intrinsically valuable about them (what does it have to do with the coins themselves?), nor am I sure 100+ years from now anybody will care whether one ASE was minted or purchased (by a collector) earlier on or not. Do we take those considerations when judging two exactly the same MS-65 1909s VDB pennies?
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United States
1265 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
When you guys are talking about "rare" isn't the Canadian Version of the Pride Sets the Rarest of them all with only 10,000 minted?

The grading companies are both indicating that they will be giving the Pride Sets properly submitted special designations that include the Mint of Origin, and special Registry tracking. Doesn't that make it Official?

That means the ASE series has a New Key IMHO.

Packaging is rarer, but not the coins themselves which are the same. Most people want to collect all of the coins, but most don't collect duplicates in different packaging. Some do though. Coin rarity has a far greater impact on the price than the packaging rarity.

If you want to see an odd example of how packaging can impact the price of a coin, take a look at the 2016 Congratulations set. Only about 6k of these sets were produced, but the mintage of the proof ASE was about 450k. The 2016 Congratulations set was not even noticed until the 2017 Congratulations set came out with the S produced proof ASE that had a total mintage only 75k. Then people noticed low production (not mintage) of the 2016 Congratulations set and the value shot up. Some paid up to $1500, but the value now seems to be lower with prices all over the place. This is a case of the packaging literally being worth more than the coin.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1265 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The same thing goes for "Early Release" or "First Day" certifications. Not sure what's so intrinsically valuable about them (what does it have to do with the coins themselves?),

I think that the 3rd party graders were attempting to capitalize off the historical knowledge that more often than not the first coins off of a die pair have the best strike and overall quality. Think Morgan dollars for example. Of course the reality is that these collector coins are not necessarily shipped out in the order they were produced. Plus, most all of these are really early releases given that they're sold out. Slapping an early release label on a slab is much easier than actually evaluating the quality of the strike, which for most is very similar anyway.
Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add historicantiques to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

I'm new to the Modern Coin market and collecting, but it seems like the Mints and coin dealers love people putting values on packaging, certifications, labels, etc. because it means more sales not only for coins, but for packaging/labeling. Now there are two markets for them to sell their products!
Valued Member
United States
75 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add dave92029 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I guess it gets down to if you see, and do you expect any potential future buyer to see value in coins that have been graded professionally and slabed?

My personal experience, early in my collecting experience, was that the graded and slabbed coins are much more marketable than the same coins in OMP. I therefore stopped collecting OMP coins and only collect slabbed versions of the coins I want.

If you or someone else buys into the Value of owning a graded and slabbed coin then the label designations are important, not the pictures, but what the professional graders indicate are the important designations.

Ever watch PBS's Antique Road Show. They discuss providence, being able to trace where the object being valued came from. That's what the Slab labels do. They provide providence to coins.

Therefore, I believe that the sets that can trace their providence back to RCM will be more valuable that the same coins which do not have that providence.

As has been said time will tell.
Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
 Posted 07/11/2019  4:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add historicantiques to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

A very interesting study would be to take 100 "Early Release" or "First Day of Issue" labeled coins and take 100 non-"Early Release" or "First Day" coins and have them graded by graders who do not know which are which.

I'd love to see what the results would be, to see if the labeled coins are really that much better, or higher quality than the non-labeled.
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