Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Post Your Coins With Stars

First page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 1,399 / Views: 55,770Next Topic
Page: of 94
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 11/29/2021  3:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Silver Dollar of the three-coin 1992 US Olympics commemorative coin program is, without question, the most famous (infamous?) of the coins.

Its notoriety is driven by its obverse design and the controversy over its very apparent. though uncredited, depiction of pitcher Nolan Ryan based on one of his Fleer baseball cards (for all the details, see the link below). The design was created by outside artist John Deecken; the design was modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Chester Y. Martin. (You can see more of Deecken's artwork via his web site at http://www.deecken.com.

The coin's reverse design, by Marcel Jovine, presents a US Shield, flanked by stylized olive branches, with "USA" and the Olympic Rings placed above it. The Shield features 13 stars, symbolic of the original 13 States. "E PLURIBUS UNUM" is seen on the ribbon below the Shield - a fitting positioning of a motto that translates into English as "OUT OF MANY, ONE."

The coin has a reeded edge, but, on the uncirculated version struck in Denver, also features the text "XXV OLYMPIAD" impressed into the reeding four times in succession. This was the first US commemorative coin to include edge lettering and the first US coin overall to include it since the halt of production of the Gold Double Eagle ($20).

1992 Olympics Silver Dollar


To read more about Nolan Ryan and the Silver Dollar's obverse design, see:

- Looking Back At The 1992 "Nolan Ryan" Dollar




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/29/2021 9:18 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 11/30/2021  07:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's the third member of the three-coin 1992 US Olympics commemorative coin program - the Gold Half Eagle.

The theme of the coin's obverse design is track and field, with a depiction of a front-facing male sprinter running toward the viewer. A vertically-hung US Flag forms the backdrop for the scene. The coin's stars are those found on the flag. Each star on the flag represents a non-specific State in the US Union.

The obverse design was created by independent artist James ("Jim") C. Sharpe who submitted his design via a Mint-sponsored contest. Sharpe's winning design was modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell. The initials of both artists are seen at the 4:30 clock position at the rim.

The coin's reverse design features a heraldic eagle evocative of the Great Seal of the United States, with "USA" and the Olympic Rings presented above it. The design was created by US Mint Graphic Designer James Peed.

I have an uncirculated example in my collection.

1992 Olympics Gold Half Eagle



For a discussion of the stars on the other coins of the 1992 Olympics program, see the posts above for the 1992 CuNi Half Dollar and the 1992 Silver Dollar.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 11/30/2021  10:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In 1993, the US Mint released a three-coin set of commemoratives on behalf of the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation: a Silver Half Dollar, a Silver Dollar and a Gold Half Eagle. The coins were struck to celebrate the Bill of Rights - the first 10 ratified amendments to the US Constitution - and the role that James Madison played in their creation.

James Madison is often referred to as the "Father of the Constitution" as a result of his central role in the drafting of the document. He was also the primary author of the Constitutional amendments that ultimately became what is today referred to as the "Bill of Rights."

The Madison-Bill of Rights story is a long one, but a great introductory background piece on Madison and his push for the Bill of Rights can be found at the Bill of Rights Institute web site: James Madison and the Bill of Rights. I recommend giving it a read!

The Half Dollar struck for the James Madison/Bill of Rights program is one of just two silver non-circulating legal tender (NCLT) half dollars struck during the modern-era of US commemorative coins (the other is the 1982 George Washington Birth 250th anniversary); a third commemorative silver half dollar is the not intended for circulation (NIFC) collector version of the Bicentennial-Kennedy Half Dollar.

The obverse design of the Madison coin presents a romanticized view of a seated Madison in the act of drafting the Bill of Rights; his Montpelier home is seen in the background. The design and modeling is the work of US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell.

At the center of the coin's reverse design is the Torch of Freedom. It is flanked by the inscriptions "THE BILL OF RIGHTS" (left) and "OUR BASIC FREEDOMS" (right). Below each flanking inscription is a single, five-pointed star that is used to bring emphasis to the corresponding inscription. The design is by free-lance graphic artist/designer Dean E. McMullen; the modeling of the design was handled within the Mint's Engraving Department.

I have several of the Madison half dollars - Proof and Uncirculated - due to the various packaging options that I have collected for it (see links below). The core coin in my collection is an Uncirculated version.

1993 James Madison - Bill of Rights Half Dollar


For other of my posts on the James Madison/Bill of Rights coins, check out:

- 1993 James Madison / Bill Of Rights Coins
- 1993 James Madison / Bill Of Rights Young Collectors Set
- 1993 James Madison / Bill Of Rights Coin and Medal Set
- 1993 A N A - James Madison Freedom Pack Redux


Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medal can be accessed via: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/30/2021 8:12 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2021  06:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Silver Dollar of the James-Madison Bill of Rights commemorative coin program did not feature any stars in its design, but the Gold Half Eagle included them on its obverse.

The obverse design, created by Scott R. Blazek, modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver William C. Cousins, presents James Madison holding and reviewing a copy of the Bill of Rights as its primary device, with "LIBERTY" and 13 stars to the right. The stars are symbolic of the 13 original States that ratified the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The design team's initials ("SB" and "WCC") are seen on Madison's right arm jacket sleeve above the elbow.

The Constituion was approved and signed by delegates of the Continental Congress on September 17, 1787. It was then sent to the States for ratification. It was ratified by New Hampshire on June 21, 1788; with this, the Constitution was approved by the needed majority among the original States. On May 29, 1790, Rhode Island, the last of the original 13 States to do so, ratified the Constitution. The Bill of Rights (featuring 12 amendments) was approved by the First US Congress on September 25, 1789. It was then sent to the States for ratification. On December 15, 1791, Virginia ratified Amendments 3 through 12 becoming the 10th State to do so and thus making the Bill of Rights an official part of the US Constitution.

The coin's reverse design was created by Joseph D. Pena; it was modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Edgar Z. Steever IV. The design features a Bald Eagle clutching a rolled up copy of (presumably) the Bill of Rights with the inscription "BILL OF / RIGHTS / EQUAL LAWS PROTECTING / EQUAL RIGHTS ARE . . . THE / BEST GUARANTEE OF / LOYALTY AND LOVE / OF COUNTRY" split across seven lines (per breaks noted). At the 8 o'clock position is depicted a Torch of Freedom, while at the 4 o'clock position is seen a laurel branch (symbolic of victory). Peed's and Steever's initials ("JDP" and "EZS", respectively) are seen beneath the bottom leaves of the laurel branch.

The coin in my collection is an Uncirculated example with a nice satiny appearance.

1993 James Madison - Bill of Rights Gold Half Eagle



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
12/01/2021 1:32 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2021  09:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great looking coin and fascinating history to go with it.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2021  09:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's time for a quick look at the 1993 (1991-95) World War II 50th Anniversary half dollar. The CuNi Clad Half Dollar was part of a three-coin program that also included a Silver Dollar and a Gold Half Eagle. Unlike the Half Dollar, neither the Silver Dollar nor the Gold Half Eagle features stars as part of their design.

The coin's obverse design is dominated by a large "V" at its center. The "V" is depicted at an angle that extends away from the viewer; the "V" is meant to be symbolic of "Victory" by the US and Allies in the War. Stretching in front of the "V" are three members of the US military, at far left is depicted a female nurse, at center is a male sailor and at right is a helmeted male soldier. It appears the soldier is an Army Soldier vs. a Marine, due to the lack of camouflage cover on the helmet. Attaching camouflage to a helmet was typical of Marine units beginning in 1942 after the invasion of Guadalcanal, but both services were issued the same core helmet so it could be a soldier from either. At the top of the design is seen a Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber with five stars above it. The stars acknowledge the five-star rank which was created within the US military during WWII - in 1944 - and first awarded in December of the same year.

The design is the work of George Klauba with US Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti handling the sculpting-engraving. The initials of each are seen on the left collar of the soldier.

The coin's reverse presents a soldier defending his segment of an island beachhead, with a US plane overhead and a US Navy ship in the background; the ship is depicted in the midst of firing a forward gun. The design is by Bill J. Leftwich; it was sculpted/engraved by the US Mint's T. James Ferrell.

1993 World War II 50th Anniversary Half Dollar



For an interesting packaging option for the coin, and additional discussion of the five-star rank, check out:

- 1993 World War II Half Dollar Paperweight


For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, have at look at: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
12/01/2021 09:38 am
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2021  2:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1994 commemorative program in support of the 1994 World Cup - hosted by the United States - consisted of three coins: a CuNi Clad Half Dollar, a Silver Dollar and a Gold Half Eagle. Of the three, only the silver dollar included stars within its designs.

The obverse design of the coin features two male soccer (football) players, both of whom appear to be about to kick the ball as they run toward it. Above the heads of the two players, at the rim, is the inscription "LIBERTY." Between each of the inscription's letters are found stars - six in total. I haven't read an official description that assigns any symbolism to the stars, but I think it's a good possibility that they represent the six member associations of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the international governing body that sponsors the World Cup. The six member associations are:

1. ASIAN FOOTBALL CONFEDERATION
2. CONFÉDÉRATION AFRICAINE DE FOOTBALL
3. THE CONFEDERATION OF NORTH, CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN ASSOCIATION
4. CONFEDERACIÓN SUDAMERICANA DE FÚTBOL
5. OCEANIA FOOTBALL CONFEDERATION
6. UNION DES ASSOCIATIONS EUROPÉENNES DE FOOTBALL

The design was created by Dean McMullen; it was modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Farrell.

The coin's reverse design, common to all three coins of the program, presents the official logo of the 1994 World Cup framed by laurel branches. The design for the coin was prepared by Dean McMullen; the core logo was created by Michael Geircke and James Anderson of Pentagram, a design firm with offices in London (England), New York City, Austin (Texas), and Berlin (Germany).

1994 World Cup Logo in Color

(Image Credit: World Cup USA 1994, Inc. / Pantagram. Fair use.)

The logo is strongly influenced by the US Flag. It consists of waving white and red stripes with a blue-paneled soccer ball in the upper left; diagonal blue lines trail behind the ball and give it a sense of motion.

1994 World Cup Silver Dollar



If you'd like to learn more about the US Mint;s 1994 World Cup coins, see:

- 1994 World Cup Coins - Part I
- 1994 World Cup Coins - Part II
- 1994 World Cup Coins - Part III
- 1994 World Cup Coins - Striker Set


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
 Posted 12/01/2021  2:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have never cared much for the obverse here, but I have always liked that reverse.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6995 Posts
 Posted 12/02/2021  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1994 Capitol Bicentennial commemorative silver dollar was issued to help mark the bicentennial of the US Capitol Building. It is one of those "so close" events that are sometimes commemorated on US coins - the construction of the Capitol began in 1793 - so, 1993 would have been the better year for a 200th anniversary commemorative coin. But, 1994 stood in nicely!

The obverse of the 1994 US Capitol Bicentennial commemorative silver dollar depicts the US Capitol Dome (to the right of center). The statue of Freedom on top of the dome is surrounded by a circle of 13 stars, meant to symbolize the 13 states that had ratified the US Constitution and were part of the Union at the time construction on the Capitol began. US Mint Sculptor-Engraver William C. Cousins was the designer/engraver. The design has always resonated with me and is one of my favorites within the modern series.

John Mercanti handled the coin's reverse design. It is a rendering of a design segment found on a pair of standalone, circular windows, one found at the first floor landing of the grand stairway for the House and the other in the same location within the Senate stairway. The design includes a US Shield thst features 13 stars, once again being symbolic of the original 13 States. The Shield is encircled by a wreath made of olive branches (symbolic of peace) with four draped US Flags behind it; stars are visible on each of the flags. A Bald Eagle surmounts the design elemts and is presented with out-stretched wings while clutching three arrows in its right talon and an olive branch in its left.

1994 US Capitol Bicentennial Silver Dollar



For a more extensive discussion of the US Capitol and its construction, see:

- 1994 US Capitol 200th - Architectural History Set


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
108070 Posts
Page: of 94 Previous TopicReplies: 1,399 / Views: 55,770Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.69 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: