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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 10/06/2020  7:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks again Bob, I hope they may be of use to someone.
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 Posted 10/07/2020  7:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another coin from Miletus with a lion and star theme.

When Seleucus I Nikator made substantial donations to the sanctuary of Didyma, and returned the statue of Apollo that had been stolen by the Persians in 494 BC., (Previous post.) he knew it would cement a good relationship. Didyma was the largest ,and most significant sanctuary in the territory of the city of Miletus, containing a temple and oracle of Apollo, the Didymaion.

Next to Delphi, Didyma was the most renowned oracle of the Hellenic world, and though it is first mentioned in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo, it preceded literacy and even the Hellenic colonization of Ionia. Visitors would follow the Sacred Way to Didyma, around about 17 km in length. Along the way, were ritual way stations, and statues of members of the Branchidae family, male and female, as well as animal figures. Some of these statues, dated to the 6th century BC.

Ionia, Miletus, 375 - 350 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo right. Reverse: ANTIANΔΡΟΣ, lion standing right, looking back at star in upper field. Bronze. Diameter: 18 mm. Weight: 4.9 gr. Sear 4515v.
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 Posted 10/08/2020  6:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The last of the lion and star coins from Miletos is this little one at only 10 mm. Apollo is facing this time, but the lion is still looking back at the star. The star is thought to represent the Sun in association with Apollo.

Ionia, Miletos, 3rd cent. BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo facing. Reverse: Lion standing right, looking back at star in upper field. MNHO (magistrate's name) in exergue. Bronze. Diameter 10 mm. Weight: 0.5 gr. Sear 4518v.
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 Posted 10/09/2020  7:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Originally listed as from Telmissos in Caria, circa 3rd cent. BC, researching this coin proved really interesting. It turned out to be from the little known Termessos Minor, circa 1st century BC.

The early history of the settlement of Oenoanda (Oinoanda) in Lycia is obscure. It would appear that Oenoanda became a colony of Termessos about 200-190 BC and was also known as Termessos Minor (or Termessos I pros Oinoanda). The city was built on the top of a high mountain, located in the upper valley of the River Xanthus, in what is now modern southwest Turkey.

Diogenes of Oenoanda was an Epicurean Greek from the 2nd century AD, who carved a summary of the philosophy of Epicurus onto a portico wall in the ancient city. The surviving fragments of the wall, which originally extended to about 80 meters, form an important source of Epicurean philosophy. The inscription, written in Greek, sets out Epicurus' teachings on physics, epistemology, and ethics. It was originally about 25,000 words long and filled 260 square meters of wall space. Less than a third of it has been recovered.

It was a substantial city in antiquity, but surprisingly it issued it's own silver coins only briefly in its long history. Until recently, Oenoanda in Lycia was known numismatically for just one single silver coin acquired by the British Museum in 1897. It is illustrated in Sear's Greek Coins and Their Values and described as "Unique", but a few more specimens of this second century BC didrachm have now come to light. There are bronze coins too, of which this is one.

Lycia, Termessos Minor, c. 1st century BC.
Obverse: Head of Hermes wearing petasos right, bee at shoulder. Reverse: Eagle standing right on kerykeion. Bronze. Diameter: 11 mm. Weight: 1.09 gr. SNG Copenhagen 143.
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 Posted 10/09/2020  7:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another excellent write-up.
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 Posted 10/09/2020  7:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
.....Some great additions to your collection lately Jim. Enjoying the write ups and coins Thanks....Paul
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 Posted 10/10/2020  7:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks again, Bob and Paul. I'm really enjoying researching these coins.

Another small bronze from a mountain top city, Aigai (or Aegae), Aeolis. The city was located almost on the top of Mount Gun, known in antiquity as "the Mountain of the Sun", and was an important sanctuary of Apollo. It lies approximatel 90 Km north of Smyrna, (the modern day Izmir), and the badge of the city was the goat's head. The city was said to have been founded around 1100 BC, but excavaions have discovered nothing prior to the 8th century BC.

Aigai is mentioned by Herodotus and Strabo as one of the twelve largest cities founded by the Aeolian colonists, but being inland it was isolated from the other Aeolian cities. This was considered to be the reason why Aigai never reached the same degree of development that the coastal cities achieved.

Aigai was part of the extended kingdom of Lydia around the first half of the sixth century BC. In 546 BC Aigai managed to resist the Persian forces and maintain it's independence, probably due to it's rugged location, and relative poverty. That, and being difficult to capture, would discourage the use of large military forces. Little is known about the evolution of the city around this period. It was however mentioned by the Athenian statesman Themistocles in 469 BC, when he passed through Aigai during his flight from Greece to Persia, and was well received by his friend Nikogenes who was a resident in the city.

The conquest of Asia Minor by Alexander the Great in 334 BC returned Aigai to the Hellenic world. Aigai's most successful period was under the Attilid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC.

Aigai had no coinage of it's own till it's inclusion in Alexander's empire, with bronze coins being minted at the end of the 4th century BC. The initial coinage was basic, with Apollo, the deity of the city on the obverse, and a goat's head on the reverse. Later coins would show the bust of Athena, the complete goat or forepart, and the goddess Nike etc.

Aigai would not have the economic status to mint silver coins until the middle of the second century BC. Around 160 BC a series of tetradrachms with the bust of Apollo on the obverse, and a naked image of Zeus on the reverse, were struck, with the Greek legend AIΓAIEΩN (AIGAIEON). It was a low mintage series, with only four obverse dies known. This would indicate that, although the city was prosperous, it did not reach the wealth level of other surrounding cities.

Aeolis, Aigai, 300-200 BC.
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right. Reverse: Forepart of goat right; ΑΙΓΑΕ above. Bronze. Diameter: 13 mm. Weight: 2.12 gr.
Kapossy 14.
Black patina.
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 Posted 10/11/2020  6:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This coin from Komama in Pisidia is the antithesis of the others, inasmuch as I can find information and images about the coin, but not much about Komama it's self. A search of CCF did not turn up anything either.

https://www.wildwinds.com/coins/gre...GvA_5064.jpg

The site is given as 45 Km south of Burdur, and I've placed it on a map of modern day Turkey.

The following is from The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites:
"KOMAMA (Serefonu) Turkey.
City in Pisidia near Urkutlu, 45 km S of Burdur, which first appears in the late Hellenistic period when it issued autonomous bronze coins. It belonged no doubt to the commune Milyadum mentioned by Cicero (Verr. 1.95), and may have been its capital. A colony was planted by Augustus about 6 B.C., entitled Colonia Julia Augusta Prima Fida Comama. As the site is on flat ground and completely unfortified, it seems to have been intended not so much to repress the unruly Pisidians as to serve as a market town spreading Roman influence by peaceful means; it was well situated near the junction of several important thoroughfares. The colonial coinage is of the 2d and 3d c. A.D.

The surviving ruins are scanty. They lie on and around a hillock and consist merely of scattered blocks, some of which are inscribed and confirm the site. Nothing is standing. Many other cut blocks and inscriptions have been removed to neighboring villages."

Pisidia, Komama, 1st cent. BC.
Obverse: Two jugate bearded heads right. Reverse: Lion bounding right. Bronze. Diameter 13 mm. Weight: 2.23 gr.
SNG Von Aulock 5064
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 Posted 10/12/2020  04:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Now that's an interesting coin Jim!

Did find this link....Interesting that Marcus Aurelius and Antoninus Pius both had coins minted from Comama.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comama
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 Posted 10/12/2020  09:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for that Paul.

It seems really odd that the city was in existence for a long time, had connections with coinage of Marcus Aurelius and Antoninus Pius, but had so little of it's history recorded. Apart from a given location it appearers to have disappeared from the map. It's almost as if it never existed!

Jim
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 Posted 10/13/2020  1:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I didn't have a coin from Leontini, so this bounding lion fitted the bill.

The historian Polybius describes Leontini as lying in a valley between two hills, each topped by an acropolis. Located around 6 miles inland, it is virtually the only Greek settlement in Sicily that is not located on the coast. The rich plains north of the city, called Leontini Campi, were some of the most fertile in Sicily and produced abundant crops of wheat. The modern town of Lentini, Sicily, is a prosperous agricultural centre of over 20,000 inhabitants, and lies somewhat to the north-west of the original site. It was the birthplace of Gorgias, "the Nihilist."

Leontini never attained much political importance due to its proximity to Syracuse.

Originally held by the Sicels (Siculi), Leontini's command of the fertile plain on the north made it an attractive site to the Chalcidians from Naxos, who colonized it in 729 BC. The city fell under the yoke of Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela in 494 BC, who made his ally Aenesidemus its tyrant. Then in 476 BC, the despot Hieron of Syracuse, having expelled the inhabitants of Catana and Naxos from their native cities, which he peopled with new colonists, established the exiles at Leontini. The city did regain its independence later, but in an attempt to retain their independence they invoked the interventions of Athens on more than one occasion. Leontini was noted as the birthplace of the celebrated orator Gorgias, who in 427 BC was the head of the deputation sent by his native city to implore the intervention of Athens. These Athenian expeditions into Sicily were unsuccessful.

The city was taken by Marcus Claudius Marcellus in 214 BC, but in Roman times it seems to have been of small importance. It was destroyed by the Saracens in 847 AD, and almost completely ruined by the earthquake of 1693 AD.

Sicily, Leontini, after 210 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo left; plough behind. Reverse: Forepart of roaring lion left; monogram below. Bronze. Diameter: 15 mm. Weight: 2.12 gr. Black patina.
SNG München 587.
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 Posted 10/13/2020  9:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Neat type. Thanks for sharing.
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 Posted 10/14/2020  04:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another nice coin Jim....

Quote:
it is virtually the only Greek settlement in Sicily that is not located on the coast. The rich plains north of the city, called Leontini Campi, were some of the most fertile in Sicily and produced abundant crops of wheat.
.....With the depiction of the plough behind Apollo's head showing just how important an agricultural area it was....25 years ago I was in Syracuse and visted the Baroque church in Lentini the area was beautiful!...Saying that pretty much the whole island is stunning!

Jim this is turning into a very informative thread (Thanks)...
Just an idea but maybe you could write an index page and have one of the mods place it on your initial post?...I did a similar thing over on the world forum a couple of years back, when I ran a long thread on British colonial coinage. It would make searching for a reference coin or area a lot easier rather than scrolling through the whole thread...
Just a thought?.....Looking forward to your next....Paul
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 Posted 10/14/2020  7:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks again Bob and Paul.

Quote:
maybe you could write an index page

That is a good idea Paul, as it is a pain to have to scroll through all the pages.

This little coin from Marion in Cyprus has turned up some conflicting information. It was originally listed as "Cyprus, Marion, under King Timocharis, 395 BC.", however, another site quotes coins being minted by Timocharis from 350 to 332 BC. Stasioikos II had similar coins minted, but I found an auction sale for a Timocharis coin which is almost identical. (below)

The Cyprus Island web site states; "The ancient kingdom of Marion, with it's capital city (today's Polis Chrysochous) was also in the Paphos district. As inscriptions and coins show, we know the names of only 5 Kings of Marion." It then names the kings as; Doxandros, Sasmas, Stasiikos I, Timocharis, and Stasiikos II.

The Ancient city of Marion, was one of the ten famed city-kingdoms, and had been initially founded in the 7th century BC by the Mycenaean civilisation, otherwise known as the Achaeans, who were the founders of the Mycenaean empire in Greece.

Prior to liberation in 449 BC by Athens, the prosperous Marion City was under the Persian rule, as were the majority of city-kingdoms on the island. The city flourished due to the copper and gold found in the nearby Limni Mines, the majority of the gold being exported to Athens. It also served as an imperative trading port, exporting both metal and timber.

Literary evidence has shown that after the battle between Antigonus and Ptolemy I of Egypt, where Ptolemy prevailed, the last king of Marion, Stasioikos II, was arrested in 312 BC, his city was destroyed, and its inhabitants transported to (Nea) Paphos.

Cyprus, Marion, under King Timocharis, 395 BC.
Obverse: Head of roaring lion right. Reverse: Spearhead, M A above. Bronze. Diameter: 9 mm. Weight: 0.79 gr.
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 Posted 10/15/2020  1:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This little coin is only 9.5 mm in diameter, but is causing much head scratching. It was listed as Ares, from Pergamon in Mysia, and the ΠΕΡΓΑ below the two bulls' heads is clearly seen. The original coin envelope says Pallas in crested helmet. The reference given is Sear 3954v.

I can't find a match for Ares helmeted facing right, with a two confronted bulls reverse. I can't find a match for Athena helmeted facing right, with a two confronted bulls reverse, nor for Pallas either. There is a coin, listed as Pergamon in Asia Minor 350BC Ancient Greek Coin Apollo Bull heads, with the reference Sear 3954, but is described as "Laureate head of Apollo right."

Can anyone help to properly attribute this coin?

Original:
Mysia, Pergamon, c. 350 BC.
Obverse: Head of Ares in crested helmet right. Reverse: ΠΕΡΓΑ below two bulls' heads face to face. Bronze. Diameter: 9.5 mm. Weight: 1.2 gr.
Lind Asia 284; Sear 3954v.
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