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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 10/23/2020  4:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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The coin in the Vcoins link you posted is the only other coin I have seen that is a close match. I checked out the Svoronos 1716 reference, but it showed coins with the head of Zeus sporting the large mop of very curly hair. We know the coin exists, but getting a proper identification is not proving to be easy.

Yes I agree Jim, I've been searching and can't seem to find another?....I'm pretty sure now that your id of the lotus is correct.....The Cypriot mint seemed to love using perfectly round flans eh! ....It's a really cool coin and looks to be quite rare. Maybe speak with the vcoins owner of the matched coin he might be able to help?

You're on a roll of nice coins...Really like the eagle reverse..
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 Posted 10/23/2020  10:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Paul.

Quote:
Maybe speak with the vcoins owner of the matched coin he might be able to help?

I had mulled that over Paul, but there is even less information given in that listing than even I got with my example.

Quote:
The Cypriot mint seemed to love using perfectly round flans eh!

Yes!

I've written to the author of, "The Lotus Of Aphrodite On Ptolemaic Bronzes", and hopefully I'll get a reply. Everything points to it being a Ptolemy, but which one? It does seem to be a bit of an oddball of a coin.
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 Posted 10/25/2020  8:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There is a large CND on the reverse of this coin, but I doubt if it would have anything to do with nuclear disarmament.

Modern day Palermo sits on top of the ruins of, and takes it's name from, the ancient city of Panormos. The city was settled in the middle of the 8th century BC by the Phoenicians, and was known as Ziz. A small part of the Phoenician defence wall can still be seen in the Santa Caterina Monastery. Palermo's major trading partner under the Phoenicians was Carthage, and the city enjoyed a long period of peace.

The first settlement is known as Paleapolis, meaning "Old City", in order to distinguish it from a second settlement built during the 5th century BC, called Neapolis, or "New City". The new city was built outside of the walls of the old city, and had it's own enclosure of walls.

During the Sicilian Wars the Greeks named the settlement Panormos, meaning "all port" due to its large anchorage.

In 265 BC, Syracuse allied with the Romans and pushed the Carthaginians off of the island, and in 254 BC Panormos was besieged and conquered by the Romans in the first battle of Panormus. When the outer city was taken by the Romans, the walled inner city was still able to withstand them for some time.

Panormus was a flourishing and beautiful city during the Golden Age of the Roman Republic and Empire. According to geographer Strabo, during the Roman Empire it provided large amounts of wheat for the capital. However, after the reign of Vespasian, it decayed, and in 445 AD was sacked by the King of Vandal Africa, Gaiseric. Later it was part of the territory of Odoacer and Theoderic's Ostrogoths.

Unusually, this coin from Panormus has a depiction of Livia seated instead of a portrait.

SICILY, Panormos, 14 - 37 AD, time of Tiberius.
Obverse: Livia seated right, holding scepter and patera; ΠΑΝΟΡΜΙTAΝ around. Reverse: Ram standing left, CND above. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 5.3 gr.
SNG ANS 574.
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 Posted 10/27/2020  10:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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I've written to the author of, "The Lotus Of Aphrodite On Ptolemaic Bronzes", and hopefully I'll get a reply.

I did get a very nice reply from Catharine C. Lorber, author of "Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire", regarding the Ptolemy coin. The relevant part is below.

"Based on the presence of a dotted border on the reverse, I'd be inclined to date your specimen relatively early, i.e., to the reign of Ptolemy VI, and to identify it as Svoronos 1408.

I think this issue is Alexandrian rather than Cypriote."

Updated details:
Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 181 - 145 BC.
Obverse: Head of Zeus Ammon right. Reverse: Eagle standing left with closed wings; lotus in left field. Bronze. Diameter 14 mm. Weight: 2.77 gr.
Svoronos 1408. Struck in Alexandria.
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 Posted 10/27/2020  6:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice one Jim ....
Good to see you got an ID from a lady who knows her Ptolemaic Bronzes! And thanks for the feedback.
As I said before a rare little coin...Congrats.
Interesting the Alexandrian mint.
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 Posted 10/28/2020  12:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Interesting the Alexandrian mint.

Yes, it was a bit of a surprise Paul. Using the information Ms. Lorber supplied, I found some coins of this type located in the British Museum. It never ceases to amaze me, that knowledgeable people in the world of numismatics are so willing to share their knowledge.

http://numismatics.org/pco/id/svoronos-1904.1408

The city of Parion (Parium) in Mysia is probably best known for it's Gorgeoneion and bull coins. (There is an example of one on page 11 of this thread.) Other devices found on Parion coins include Athena, Zeus, Artemis, Demeter, Nike, Hermes, an altar, torch, thunder bolt, and grapes. Parion produced an abundance of coins, attesting to it's advanced mint capabilities. This coin features a bull butting right, and The Great Altar of Parion. Prior to 354 B.C. the sculptor Praxiteles executed a statue of Eros there.

The Great Altar of Parion was built by Hermocreon, a Greek architect, and according to Strabo it was a state altar, 1 stadia (600 Greek feet) long. It was built of material from an abandoned temple near Parion, which is thought to be the one depicted on some bronze coins.

Parion - Mysia 350-300 BC.
Obverse: Bull butting right; wreath above. Reverse: Lit altar in three-quarter perspective; amphora set at base. Reverse Inscription: Π-Α/Ρ-Ι. Bronze. Diameter: 20 mm. Weight: 5.2 gr.
Reference: BMC 42
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 Posted 10/28/2020  4:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another nice Parion issue.
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 Posted 10/29/2020  2:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bob.

Another testament to the die cutter's art is this tiny 8 mm coin from Kyme in Aeolis.

Aeolis (Aiolis) occupied the coastal region of western Anatolia between Smyrna and the bay of Edremit. Kyme was one of twelve major Aeolian cities counted by Herodotos. Aeolis was conquered by Kroisos (Croesus), king of Lydia (560-546 BC), and later held successively by the Persians, Macedonians, Seleukids, and Pergamenes. Attalos III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed Aiolis to Rome in 133 BC.

In legend, Kyme was founded by the Amazon Kyme, one of a mythical tribe of warlike women who fought against Greek heroes. However, according to Strabo, Kyme was founded by Greek colonists from Locris after the Trojan War. The city was assessed in the Delian Confederacy at the very high figure of nine talents, and is called by Strabo the biggest and best of the Aeolian cities. Kebren and Side are said to have been her colonies.

Kyme minted coins from the 7th century BC to the 3d century AD, and when first circulated around 600-550 BC, utilised the symbol of the horse, which ties them to the house of Agamemnon and the glory of the Greek victory over Troy. Julius Pollux credits Damodice, the daughter of Agamemnon of Kyme, with inventing coined money after she married King Midas. The prancing horse probably also alludes to the prosperous equine industry of the region. Kyme's incuse horse head silver fractions, Hemiobols, are a candidate for the title of the Second Oldest coins, and the first used for retailing on a large scale basis by the Ionian Greeks.

Later in history the Kymeans were to be ridiculed as a people who had for three hundred years lived on the coast, and not once exacted harbour taxes on ships making port. In reality this would have attracted more trade ships than the other ports, bringing wealth to the city. Kyme has virtually no history in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and very little of the ancient city remains today.

Aeolis, Kyme. AR Fraction, c. 350 BC.
Obverse: Forepart of prancing horse right, K (retrograde) above. (On this coin there is also a Y beneath the horse's right foreleg.) Reverse: Rosette. Silver. Diameter: 8 mm. Weight: 0.30 gr.
Sear 4177.
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 Posted 10/29/2020  6:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sweet litle coin Jim!..
The stellate design has lovely detail and I really like the movement of the horse on the obverse....Very nice!

Quote:
Another testament to the die cutter's art is this tiny 8 mm coin from Kyme in Aeolis.
..Completely agree, it's amazing the amount of detail these engravers could tranfer onto a fingernail sized flan
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 Posted 10/29/2020  7:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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it's amazing the amount of detail these engravers could tranfer onto a fingernail sized flan

Indeed Paul, and with the most rudimentary of tools.
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 Posted 10/30/2020  5:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow!.....Nice photo!..That really puts it into perspective.

Quote:
it's amazing the amount of detail these engravers could tranfer onto a fingernail sized flan
....
Edit........transfer onto a much smaller than fingernail sized flan...
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 Posted 10/30/2020  7:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The few silver fractions in this thread have been holding their own against all the bronzes. Super coins all.
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 Posted 10/31/2020  7:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Edit........transfer onto a much smaller than fingernail sized flan...

It looks even smaller on a thumbnail.
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 Posted 10/31/2020  8:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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The few silver fractions in this thread have been holding their own against all the bronzes. Super coins all.

Thanks Bob, they do have a charm all of their own, and this eagle is a favourite of mine. It is not as sharp as the previous coin, but it is around a century older.

Aeolis, Kyme. AR Hemiobol. c. 450 BC.
Obverse: Eagle's head left, KY below beak. Reverse: Shallow quadripartite incuse square. Silver. Diameter: 8 / 6 mm. Weight: 0.50 gr.
Sear 4174.
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 Posted 10/31/2020  8:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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this eagle is a favourite of mine.


Nice. He's stern looking. Simple but expressive rendition.
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