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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 11/01/2020  04:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
......Another nice little coin.

Just out of curiosity Jim..How do you store these tiny fractions?
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 Posted 11/01/2020  10:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Just out of curiosity Jim..How do you store these tiny fractions?

Carefully Paul, very very carefully.

I dread the thought of one of them dropping to the floor, never to be seen again. The coins are put into small cropped sachets, which are folded over and placed into acid free paper envelopes. The top flap of the envelope is tucked into the bottom fixed flap, as in the picture. Even if the envelope is turned upside down, the coin shouldn't fall out.

The envelopes are placed upright in storage boxes like the one below. Touch wood, I haven't lost one yet.
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 Posted 11/01/2020  2:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow your very organised Jim a nice idea for a storage system...Can quite understand not wanting to play around with those sweet little fractions to much, it has been many years since I've been in the UK but I do remember 'shag pile carpets'

I have mine in open trays stored in aluminium cases see below, great for being able to pick them up when you want but not good for keeping references.....So now I'm working on a digital book trying to enter all the data on each coin before it all gets to much to remember
Edited by Palouche
11/01/2020 2:54 pm
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 Posted 11/01/2020  7:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The blue backing in your display tray really shows off the coins to their best advantage, Paul. It's just the right colour. I like the idea of the digital book too.

I write a brief description on each envelope, and put all the relevant information into an Excel spreadsheet. I have to write everything down, as the short term memory is not so good these days.

I've been using these boxes for a little while now, and they close nicely on the 2" x 2" envelopes, so less chance of them falling out. I just got a wooden cabinet with three pull out drawers for the 2" x 2" envelopes. It holds 640 coin envelopes, and will keep them all in the one place.

I did drop one of the little coins a while back, and had a devil of a job finding it.
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 Posted 11/01/2020  7:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another eagle, this time from Hieropolis-Kastabala in Cilicia. The name of the place can be a bit confusing, as it is also known as Hierapolis Castabala, Kastabala, Bodrum Kalesi, Hierapolis ad Pyramum, and Hierapolis pros to Pyramo. Hierapolis is not a major site and not a great deal is known about it except that Alexander the Great passed through in 333 BC.

Hierapolis is located on the Cilician Plain, in the foothills of the Taurus Mountians in the eastern part of Cilicia Pedias. It was frequently called Hierapolis ad Pyramum, as it lies in the valley of the Ceyhan River, which in antiquity was known as Pyramus. Today the site can be found at Bodrum Kalesi (Bodrum Castle), north of Osmaniye. Located in a region that had no link to the sea and no strategic importance, the city had connections with a range of different regions in antiquity due to its geographical characteristics.

The ancient city was thought to be around 2,000 years old, but recent excavations have shown that it goes back a further 1,500 years, showing that Hierapolis was settled 3,500 years ago. The site was built on three layers and not on two layers as previously thought. Hierapolis experienced its golden age in the second century B.C.

High up on a rock overlooking Hierapolis are the remains of Kastabala (also called; Castabala, Bodrum or Budrum Kalesi). It is thought that the castle may have been built by the Armenians to protect the medieval Kingdom of Cilicia, or by the Knights of St John to protect the route taken by the Crusaders as they headed for the Holy Land. Unfortunately no records exist to support either theory.

There was a cult to the goddess Perasia, a local manifestation of the ancient Hittite deity Kubaba. During the Hellenistic and Roman periods Perasia retained her traditional name, and her cult followed distinctively local rites in which her priestesses walked upon fiery coals.

Cilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala, 2nd - 1st cent. BC.
Obverse: Veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, monogram behind. Reverse: Eagle standing left with folded wings. (I)EROPOLITO(N) - TONPROSTO(I) PYRAMOI - THSIERAS - KAI - SE(--). Bronze. Diameter: 21 mm. Weight: 7.88 gr.
Lindgren I 1508.
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 Posted 11/01/2020  8:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great info and neat coin, Jim - although I think that, by the looks of things, the Kyme eagle could kick this one's butt.
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 Posted 11/02/2020  07:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I think that, by the looks of things, the Kyme eagle could kick this one's butt.

I totally agree, Bob. The Kyme eagle is one mean looking eagle!

This coin from Kaunos (Caunus) in Caria is well worn, but it does have two animals, a bull and a sphinx.

At one time Kuanos was an important sea port at the mouth of the Kalbis (Calbys) river, now known as the Dalyan river, on the border between Caria and Lycia. The city had dockyards, an outer southern habour, and an inner northwest harbour. The inner harbour could be closed with chains. The delta eventually silted up, and the port became inaccessible. Today, the ancient harbour is an inland lake (the Lake of the Leeches), some five kilometres from the sea.

According to legend Kaunos was founded by King Kaunos, son of King Miletus of Crete, and grandson of Apollo. Kaunos had a twin sister calledf Byblis who developed a deep, unsisterly love for him. When she wrote her brother a love letter telling him about her feelings, he decided to flee with some of his followers to settle elsewhere. Byblis became mad with sorrow, started looking for him and tried to commit suicide. Mythology has it that the Calbys river emerged from her tears.

After the Greek victory over Persia in the naval battle of Salamis in 480 BC, Kaunos joined the Delian League and was part of the Athenian zone of influence.

In the fourth century BC Persian rule was re-established under the satraps Hecatomnus and then his son Maussolus. To the north of the acropolis, the remnants of the Persian defensive walls, eight meters high, are still visible.

After Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy had conquered the area in 333 BC, the city had several masters: Antigonus, Ptolemy, Demetrius, Lysimachus, the Ptolemies from 309 BC, the Seleucids, the Rhodians, and finally, after 166 BC, Rome.

In 88 BC Kaunos supported Mithridates VI of Pontus against Rome and massacred resident Roman citizens. The Romans defeated Mithridates and punished Kaunos by returning the city in 81 BC to the Rhodians. which continued well into the first century AD.

Strabo of Amasia describes Kaunos, and mentions that people in this coastal area often suffered from malaria:
The city has dockyards, and a harbor that can be closed. Above the city, on a height, lies Imbros, a stronghold. Although the country is fertile, the city is agreed by all to have foul air in the summer, as also in autumn, because of the heat and the abundance of fruits. And indeed little tales of the following kind are repeated over and over, that Stratonicus the citharist, seeing that the Kaunians were pitiably pale, said that this was the thought of the poet in the verse, "even as is the generation of leaves, such is that also of men"; and when people complained that he was jeering at the city as though it were sickly, he replied, "Would I be so bold as to call this city sickly, where even the corpses walk about?"

Caria, Kaunos, ca. 350 BC.
Obverse: Bull butting right, wreath above. Reverse: Sphinx seated right, K - A / Y in field. Bronze. Diameter: 12 mm. Weight: 1.3 gr.
Sear 4821.
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 Posted 11/05/2020  11:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Antiochos VI Dionysos, the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea, was the boy king who never actually ruled. After his father was deposed by Demetrius II Nicator, the general Diodotus Tryphon, who was his father's minister, nominated Antiochus VI as king in opposition to Demetrius II. Antiochus VI gained the allegiance of most of the Seleucid domain, including Judaea, but was actually only a puppet of the general.

Born in c. 148 BC, Antiochos VI had a short life, and died in c. 138 BC. Details are sketchy, but he is said to have been nominated in 145/144 BC by Tryphon, who then deposed and succeeded him in 142/141 BC. In 138 BC Tryphon announced that Antiochos VI had contracted an internal disease and required surgery. It was then announced that the boy king had not survived the surgery, which was presumably used to cover his murder at his supposed benefactor's request.

Some accounts say that Antiochos VI was seven years old when he assumed the throne, but if he actually was born in 148 BC, he could only have been three or four years old. Though he only "reigned" for a few years, there are 29 silver and bronze coins recorded on Wildwinds.

Seleukid Kings Of Syria, Antiochos VI Dionysos. 145 - 142 BC.
Obverse: Radiate and diademed head right. Reverse: Elephant advancing left, holding torch in it's trunk, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two lines above, EΠIΦANOYΣ ΔIONYΣOY in two lines below. Bronze serrated. Diameter: 22 mm. Weight: 8.1 gr.
Sear 7081.
Edited by Novicius
11/05/2020 12:43 pm
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 Posted 11/05/2020  12:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Continuing to enjoy the uploads, Jim. Neat serrate AE with the elephant, and interesting backstory.
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 Posted 11/06/2020  6:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice elephant Jim! ...Really nice detail...
Sphinx and the 'sparrow' are also cool coins...
Thanks for the write ups I'm really enjoying the info..

Jim.......Index?
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 Posted 11/06/2020  7:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bob and Paul. Glad the write-ups are still interesting.

Quote:
Sphinx and the 'sparrow' are also cool coins...



Quote:
Jim.......Index?

Almost ready Paul, I just have to speak to one of the mods.

This coin from Trikka in Thessaly seems to be unusual, and I don't see one in the forum pages. The city was named after Trikka, a daughter of the river-god Peneios.

Trikka (Tricca) was a fortress-city that was known throughout Greece for its ancient sanctuary of Asklepios, the healer-god who was said to have been born there, and was a center for the worship of Asklepios. According to Strabo its Asklepieion was reputed to be the oldest in Greece. It was one of the corners of the square formed by Trikka, Metropolis, Pelinna, and Gomphoi (page 13 of this thread - Metropolis).

Trikka is situated in the west Thessalian plain, at the end of a long ridge which runs south from the (modern) Antichasia Mountains. and cuts the north-west part of the plain in two. The last hill of the ridge stops just north of the Lethaios (Trikkalinos) river.

Trikka issued coinage in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C., but very little is known of its history. It may have been destroyed by Philip II of Macedon along with Pharkadon since its exiles and Pharkadon's were later refused permission to return. It did however become a member of the Aitolian League, and it prospered in Roman times and later.

Thessaly, Trikka, Trichalkon. 325 - 275 BC.
Obverse: Head of nymph Trikka to right. Reverse: Young Asklepios seated on stool to right, feeding serpent with bird held in outstretched right hand. TPIKKAI (to left) ΩΝ (above). Bronze. Diameter: 21 mm. Weight: 8.25 gr.
BCD 791.2; Sear 2230.

Ex-BCD Collection. Black and olive patina.
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 Posted 11/08/2020  3:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin ....Really like the olive green patina!
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 Posted 11/09/2020  08:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Really like the olive green patina!

It is really nice in the hand Paul, but it makes it difficult to photograph. This one has a very dark, almost black, patina.

From Syracuse in Sicily, this coin features the head of the patron nymph Arethusa on the obverse, and the forepart of Pegasos on the reverse.

In mythology Arethusa's story begins in Arcadia. Coming across a clear stream she began bathing, not knowing it was the river god Alpheus. He fell in love with her, but she fled after discovering his presence and intentions, as she wished to remain a chaste attendant of Artemis. He pursued her, so she prayed to Artemis for protection, and Artemis swept her up into a cloud. Alpheus was persistent, and she began to perspire profusely from fear, turned into a stream, and fled underwater to Siracusa. Aretemis transformed her into a freshwater spring, but Alpheus journeyed under the sea to her new spring, where his waters mingled with hers.

It was said in ancient times, that a flower or cup dropped into the Alpheus River in Greece would flow under the ocean and eventually pop up in the spring of Arethusa. The River Alpheus does at one point flow into the ground, perhaps explaining the connection the ancient Greeks believed it had with Arethusa's distant spring. The water of the Arethusa Fountain is actually from the Ciane River that crosses the Porto Grande (main port) under an impermeable layer of clay.

Around the end of the fourth, and in the third centuries BC, Arethusa's image, which was often surrounded by dolphins, slowly acquired some of the characteristics of Persephone, daughter of Demeter and queen of the underworld. Grain and grain ears started to appear under Arethusa's own portraits, and Persephone soon acquired her own full portraits. By the second century BC, fertility goddess Persephone fully replaced marine nymph Arethusa's image on the coinage of Syracuse.

In Greek mythology, Kore and Persephone were interchangeable. Kore was the Ancient Greek word for young girl, or maiden, and Persephone was often referred to as such to highlight her innocence.

This coin was referenced as CNS II, 72 (Calciati 72), but I can't find that one anywhere, just CNS 79, which is slightly different.

Sicily, Syracuse. Hemilitron. c. 339 - 334 BC.
Obverse: Head of Arethusa left. Reverse: Forepart of Pegasos left. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 5.2 gr.
Calciati 72. HGC 2.
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 Posted 11/10/2020  5:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nicely detailed coin Jim.
Never heard of Arethusa before and what a great legend! Lovely story....
Enjoyed the write up thanks.


Quote:
By the second century BC, fertility goddess Persephone fully replaced marine nymph Arethusa's image on the coinage of Syracuse.
..Interesting info

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 Posted 11/11/2020  10:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Interesting info

I do enjoy researching these old coins Paul. Some of the legends and myths are fascinating.

Apparently the reason for replacing Arethusa with Persephone was political. This is from "Philosopher Kings and Tragic Heroes":
"While Arethusa was a local nymph, whose numismatic depiction contributed to the Greek colonists' conception of themselves as self-consciously Greek and distinct from Sicily's native populations, the numismatic depiction of Persephone attempted to tie Syracuse to the entire island and to the city's desire to dominate all of Sicily."

An octopus features strongly on the early coinage of Syracuse, and it's thought that it might have reflected on the high status of the delicacy in Sicily. I've been outbid on every octopus coin I've tried to acquire, apart from this one. Probably due to it's poor condition, but it is an octopus, and it is Arethusa.

Sicily, Syracuse, c. 400 BC.
Obverse: Head of Arethusa facing. Reverse: Octopus. Bronze. Diameter: 14 mm. Weight: 2.05 gr.
Calciati 29.
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