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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 11/24/2020  5:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin!....Again really out of my depth here but have you had a look at Zeus, Mysia, Adramytion? There are some that don't show the normal Laurel wreath, saying that maybe the op does?....Just a thought.
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 Posted 11/25/2020  10:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I had looked at the Zeus coins from there as well Paul. There is nothing definitive that I can pin the coin down to though. Thanks anyway.

I guess I'll leave it with the original description in the meantime.

Jim
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 Posted 12/03/2020  9:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This coin has proved interesting and is conventionally attributed to a non-extant city of Paroreia in Macedon. A search for Paroreia turned up a few pages, but they were all saying the same thing, such as this from Perseus.Tufts.edu, Perseus - Paroreia, "Paroreia, a city of Thrace on the borders of Macedonia, is called by Stephanus B. a city of Macedonia. Its inhabitants are mentioned by Pliny under the name of Paroraei." Evidence from hoards and excavations does support the Macedonian provenance.

One school of thought says that the coins were wrongly attributed to Paroreia by misinterpretation of the monogram on the reverse, and they should be assigned to Pyrrhos. The monogram to the right of the eagle should not be read as ΠAΡ, but as AΠEIΡΩTAN. Apparently the monogram is similar to ones found on clay voting plaques from Epirus. The coins of Epirus (Epeiros) that I've seen have quite a different eagle reverse though.

Wildwinds does still list the coins as Macedonia Paroreia, so does anyone else have a thought on the true attribution?

Macedon, Paroreia, 185 - 168 BC. Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right. Reverse: Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, wings closed, head reverted; monogram to right. Bronze. Diameter: 21 mm. Weight: 8.98 gr. SNG Cop 254.
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 Posted 12/06/2020  11:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I didn't have much luck in getting info on the previous Macedonia Paroreia coin, so hopefully someone will be able to expand on this one and clarify matters. It is said to be rare, but it is also very confusing.

Born in the 5th century BC, Pausanias was the son of, and succeeded, Aeropus, who according to Diodorus died of an illness after a reign of six years. There is no mention of Pausanias' son Argaeus. However, Eusebius, writing several centuries later, gives two lists of kings which only complicates matters, as they contradict each other, and in one case misses out Amyntas III altogether, going from Pausanias straight to Ptolemy Alorites, who briefly ruled in the period after Amyntas's death. The second list gives Amyntas two periods in power, of six and eighteen years (the same 24 as Diodorus), but with a two year gap for Argaeus, the son of Pausanias.

Pausanias reigned for only one year, and the year of his reign is given as 393 BC by Wildwinds. Another site states that he was assassinated by Amyntas III in 394 BC, the year of his accession. Amyntas III then succeeded him as King of Macedon.

Wildwinds lists the Argead Kings of Macedonia as:
588-568 BC Aeropos I
568-540 BC Alketas
540-498 BC Amyntas I
498-454 BC Alexander I
454-413 BC Perdikkas II
413-399 BC Archelaus
399-396 BC Orestis
396-393 BC Aeropos II
393 BC Pausanias
393 BC Amyntas II the Lioras
392-370 BC Amyntas III
370-368 BC Alexander II
Wildwinds also lists one coin of Pausanias as circa 395/4-393 BC, while others are listed as 390-389 BC, which is apparently three or four years after his assassination!

This one on ACSearch is very similar to my one (below): https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=4398786

Kings of Macedon, Pausanias, 390 - 389 BC. Obverse: Young male head to right, wearing tainia. Reverse: Forepart of boar right. Bronze. Diameter: 16 mm. Weight: 3.02 gr. Sear 1506.
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 Posted 12/06/2020  2:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Can't help with challenging attribution and chronology issues, but am enjoying the coins and history lessons you're providing us with, Jim. Thanks for sharing.
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 Posted 12/06/2020  7:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bob. I do like researching the more unusual coins, but occasionally find coins like the previous two that refuse to divulge their secrets.

There is always the hope that another member may be able to help with the missing details.
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 Posted 12/09/2020  1:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Two horses this time, on another coin from Syracuse.

Researching Hiketas (Hicetas) has proved interesting. One Hicetas was a Greek philosopher of the Pythagorean School, born in Syracuse. Another Hicetas was also a Syracusan, contemporary with the younger Dionysius and Timoleon. The Hicetas in this post, was tyrant of Syracuse during the interval between the reign of Agathocles and that of Pyrrhus.

Agathocles, who had adopted the title "King of Sicily", was said to have been poisoned by Maenon in 289 BC, who then put to death his grandson Archagathus. However another account says that it was Archagathus who poisoned his grandfather. On the death of Agathocles, Maenon took command of the army, which was besieging Aetna, and turned them on Syracuse. The Syracusans sent Hiketas against Maenon with a considerable army. The war continued without any side gaining advantage till Maenon got help from the Carthaginians, and forced the Syracusans into an ignominious peace. Shortly after the peace was made, there was the revolution that led to the expulsion of the Mamertines. Around this time Hiketas must have established himself as ruler, as Diodorus Siculus wrote that he ruled for nine years.

Little is known about the reign of Hiketas apart from the war with Phintias, the tyrant of Agrigentum, in which he obtained a considerable victory, and the war with the Carthaginians when he was defeated at the river Terias. He was expelled from Syracuse by Thynion, which took place not long before the arrival of Pyrrhus in Sicily. This must have been in either 279 BC, or 278 BC, which would tie in with the nine year reign written by Diodorus.

Sicily, Syracuse, 288 - 279 BC., reign of Hiketas.
Obverse: ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ. Head of Persephone left, wreathed with corn, stalk of barley behind head. Reverse: Galloping biga driven right by charioteer. Bronze. Diameter: 18 mm. Weight: 5.54 gr.
Sear 1209.
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 Posted 12/11/2020  07:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin Jim and interesting write up thanks.
Noticed this one that came up today maybe helps giving other references?...
https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/lo...Default.aspx
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 Posted 12/11/2020  7:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Noticed this one that came up today maybe helps giving other references?...

Cheers Paul, and thanks for the link. Any extra information is always welcome, and the references will be added to the file.
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 Posted 12/15/2020  7:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've picked up a few head-scratchers recently, but this one from Boione in Aeolis takes it to another level. I was attracted to it's lovely even, pale green patina, which unfortunately does not show in the image. Information about the coin is basic, and the location of Boione is uncertain as it's remains have never been discovered. The Barrington Atlas says it was situated somewhere between Larissa and Phokaia in the valley of the Hermos River, where its coins are generally found.

The most complete information I could find is from, "An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis":

Boione. Unlocated. Type:? The toponym is unattested, but may be constructed tentatively from the legend BOIΩNITIKON on late Classical / early Hellenistic coins. Most bronze coins have been found in the Hermos river valley (Imhoof-Blumer (1890) 631; Babelon, Traite ii.2.1177-78), and the coin types and craftsmanship resemble the coins struck in Larisa Phrikonis. A different location in Lydia was suggested by Leake (1856) 145. Although most coins are conventionally dated to C3, bronze coinage dated to C4 is described by Wroth in BMC Troas 101. Types: obv. female head l., wearing ear-ring and necklace; rev. bull standing; legend: BOIΩNITIKON or BOIΩΝITIKOΣ (SNG Cop. Aeolis 28-29, giving 310 as the terminus post quem).

Aeolis, Boione, c. 300 BC.
Obverse: Female head right. Reverse: Bull standing right. Bronze. Diameter: 11 mm. Weight: 1.15 gr.
Sear 4173v; SNG Cop 28.
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 Posted 12/15/2020  10:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another mini-mystery. Neat little coin.
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 Posted 12/17/2020  5:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting Jim!...
Again another place I'd never heard of!
Apologies, but I always like to do a quick check around when you post a coin that I've never seen before and hope I'm not 'Taking coal to Newcastle'....This is a link to a very similar type...https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/ma...px.....Again maybe helps with references?
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 Posted 12/20/2020  3:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Another mini-mystery. Neat little coin.

Thanks Bob. Another mystery indeed.

Quote:
I always like to do a quick check around when you post a coin that I've never seen before and hope I'm not 'Taking coal to Newcastle'

Thanks for the comments Paul. Any additional information about the coins is always greatly appreciated.

Another coin from Alexandria in Troas, but a few hundred years later.

After the Seleucid king Antiochus III the Great was defeated by the Romans in in the Syrian War, in 188 BC Alexandria Troas was declared "free and autonomous". During it's most prosperous time it is estimated that the city had a population of 100,000.

Successive Roman emperors, including Augustus and Hadrian, contributed to the development of the city. The Roman statesman and philosopher, Herodes Atticus, was appointed to the position of prefect of the free cities of Asia by Emperor Hadrian. In 125 AD. While holding this title, he funded the aqueduct of Alexandria Troas, fragments of which can still be seen. Herodes Atticus also sponsored a local theatre and baths.

We know from the New Testament, namely the Letters of St. Paul and the Acts of the Apostles, that there was a small Christian community existing in Alexandria in the middle of the first century AD. It was also the starting point for St. Paul when he set sail to Europe during his second missionary journey from 50 to 52 AD. St. Paul paid the city another visit during his third missionary journey from 53 to 58 AD. In the New Testament it is written that St. Paul restored the life of a young man called Eutychus during his stay in Alexandria. Eutychus had travelled to hear St. Paul's speech, but he fell asleep from exhaustion and fell from the third floor.

It is said that Constantine I the Great proposed to make Alexandria the new capital of the Roman empire, but Byzantium ended up taking preference and became known as Constantinople, thus eclipsing Alexandria in Troas. It is not known exactly when the city was abandoned, but Alexandria Troas lost its leading position in the region due to the rising importance of Constantinople. In 267 AD the Goths sacked the city, which impacted it's economic situation, the port silted up, and the city fell into disrepair. There are many ruins which can still be seen, including an aqueduct, a basilica, the bathhouse built by Herodes Atticus, temples, a theatre, an odeon, and city walls.

Troas, Alexandria, 3rd cent. AD.
Obverse: COL TRO Turreted bust of Tyche right; vexillum behind. Reverse: CO-L-AVG-TR Eagle flying right, bull's head in talons. Bronze. Diameter: 21 mm. Weight: 5.03 gr. BMC 56.
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 Posted 12/20/2020  9:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good looking Provincial, Jim. Must be a Lord of the Rings sized eagle to be holding a bull's head in its talons.
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 Posted 12/21/2020  11:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Must be a Lord of the Rings sized eagle to be holding a bull's head in its talons.


It does resemble the king of the eagles, Thorondor, though!
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