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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 12/23/2020  8:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
On page 15 of this thread, there is a previous post of the mountain top city, Aegae (or Aigai), Aeolis. The reverse of the coin, dating from the 3rd century BC, featured the forepart of a goat. Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats. The earliest coins featured Apollo on the obverse, and a goat's head on the reverse. I have since found two of them.

The first is said to be from the Lindgren collection, with his envelope. Unfortunately the envelope appears to have been lost. I can't find a plate with this coin, and it isn't in Lindgren III, which is the only Lindgren book I have. Does anyone know where I could find such a plate?

Aiolis, Aigai, 3rd cent. BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo right. Reverse: ΑΙΓΑΕ behind goat's head right; A below. Bronze. Diameter: 9 mm. Weight: 0.82 gr.
Sear 4166v; SNG Cop 2v.

The second coin is even smaller at 7 mm, and is the smallest bronze I have to date.

Aiolis, Aigai, 3rd cent. BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo right. Reverse: Head of goat right. Bronze. Diameter: 7 mm. Weight: 0.5 gr.
SNG von Aulock 1593.
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 Posted 12/24/2020  07:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Congrats on the latest Aigai acquisitions, Jim. Impressive provenance on that first one. Too bad about the missing envelope, though. Hopefully you can eventually confirm it's a plate coin.

Edit: Jim, I sent you a PM/email.
Edited by Bob L
12/24/2020 3:07 pm
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 Posted 12/24/2020  7:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Many thanks Bob. Reply sent.
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 Posted 01/06/2021  10:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Most of the early coins of Teos feature the griffin, but I haven't seen many that were affordable and in reasonable condition.

The ruins of the ancient coastal city of Teos can be seen near the village of Sigacik in Seferihisar town, Izmir, Turkey. Teos was believed to have been founded by Athames, the son of Dionysus in c 1050-1000 BC. Known as the city of Dionysus, the god of wine, Teos was also the city of artists, where the first players' guild was formed. Teos was ruled first by Lydia and then Persia. Herodotus had listed Teos as one of the 12 ancient Ionian cities.

The Temple of Dionysus was originally built by Hermogenes from Priene in the 2nd century BC. It is the largest of the temples built in the name of Dionysus in Anatolia. The temple was constantly under repair during the time of the Roman Empire due to damage by earthquakes. Today, the Temple of Dionysus is open to visitors, and is the most significant monument in Teos.

Other remains that can be visited include the theatre, which has a capacity of around 500, the agora, the city walls, the remnants of the port, the bouleuterion, and the gymnasium.

The device on the reverse of the coin looks very much like a lyre, though I have seen it listed as an amphora. On the Wildwinds site it says - lyre (or "collapsible anchor"). Now there is a novel idea.

Ionia. Teos. Magistrate Polythros. 2nd - 1st cent. BC.
Obverse: Griffin springing right. Reverse: Lyre, THIΩΝ above; magistrate's name ΠOΛY / ΘΡOYΣ to right and left. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 3.94 gr.
Sear 4590v; SNG Cop 1468.
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 Posted 01/07/2021  04:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice coin Jim! ....Interesting reverse and like the idea of a collapsible anchor!
That's your second Griffin yeh?...Congrats
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 Posted 01/07/2021  11:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Paul. I have a few griffin coins now, but none of them in very good shape unfortunately. There is one on the way though that has a nicely detailed griffin, and I hope it arrives soon. Watch this space.

This one is from the same city in Ionia as the previous coin.

Ionia, Teos, 3rd cent. BC.
Obverse: Griffin standing right, left foreleg raised. Reverse: Kantharos, THIΩΝ around; all within linear square. Bronze. Diameter 13 mm. Weight: 1.6 gr.
Sear 4588v.
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 Posted 01/17/2021  11:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another horse reverse, this time from Thessalonica under Roman rule. I haven't seen many of these bronzes in reasonable condition, and this one has the added interest of having the rarer serpent control mark below the horse, rather than the more usual caduceus.

Macedon, Thessalonika, Pseudo-autonomous, c. 168-31 BC.
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena to right. Rev: ΘΕΣΣΑ - ΛΟ - ΝΙΚΗΣ Horse galloping to right; below, serpent. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 5.6 gr.
SNG COP. 349 var.; SNG ANS 770 ff. var.
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 Posted 01/19/2021  5:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice looking coin Jim ....Again it seems to be a little rarity!
Probably wrong here but there seems to be other control marks too? Such as a club and more commonly a palm branch?...But maybe way off here.
Your coin has got nice detail, Congrats.
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 Posted 01/20/2021  10:25 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Probably wrong here but there seems to be other control marks too? Such as a club and more commonly a palm branch?

You are correct Paul, as there are other control marks as you said. I didn't find many coins that were in good enough condition to recognise the control marks, but the palm branch, and club were mentioned on a few of the sites. A couple with the caduceus did come up on ACSearch though.
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 Posted 01/20/2021  7:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Getting caught up, and enjoying the updates. More terrific bronzes on this page of the thread. Rather stag-like looking horse on the reverse of that last one.
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 Posted 01/25/2021  09:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Rather stag-like looking horse on the reverse of that last one.

It does indeed resemble the forepart of a stag with the rear and tail of a horse, Bob. Maybe we should call it a starse?

I was attracted to this fairly rare coin from Pantikapaion (Panticapaeum, or Kerch, in the Ukraine today) by the bull's head and the simple plough and palm branch. The devices show that Pantikapaion was agriculturally orientated at the time of minting.

Strabo gave a short, but very informative description of Pantikapaion and its history up to Roman times (7.4.4):
"Pantikapaion is the metropolis of the Bosporians and is situated at the mouth of Lake Maeotis [Sea of Azov]. Pantikapaion is a hill inhabited on all sides in a circuit of twenty stadia. To the east it has a harbour, and docks for about thirty ships; and it also has an acropolis. It is a colony of the Milesians. For a long time it was ruled as a monarchy by the dynasty of Leucon, Satyros, and Pairisades, as were also all the neighbouring settlements near the south of Lake Maeotis on both sides, until Pairisades gave over the sovereignty to Mithridates. They were called tyrants, although most of them, beginning with Pairisades and Leucon, proved to be equitable rulers. And Pairisades was actually held in honour as god. The last of these monarchs also bore the name Pairisades, but he was unable to hold out against the barbarians, who kept exacting greater tribute than before, and he therefore gave over the sovereignty to Mithridates Eupator. But since the time of Mithridates the kingdom has been subject to the Romans. The greater part of it is situated in Europe, although a part of it is situated in Asia".

The "Golden Age of Great Scythia", from the end of the 5th century BC to the beginning of the 3rd century BC, was a time of stability in the Kimmerian Bosporos.

Around 430 BC the Greeks began to recolonise the agricultural territories of the north west Black Sea coast. Unlike other areas of Greek colonisation in the northern Black Sea region, Pantikapaion, in the Kimmerian Bosporos was classed as apoikiai or city state.

Around 300 BC the region became unstable due to the downfall of Greater Scythia. The arrival of a new wave of nomads, the Sarmatians, precipitated a crisis worse than that of the 5th century BC. The Sarmatians appear to have dealt some severe blows to the Scythians, but failed to secure a place for themselves in Scythia. Trading became difficult, and there was a crisis in the grain trade with cheaper grain from Egypt, which led to a monetary crisis in the Bosporan Kingdom as well as other Greek states in the region.

After many internal wars there was a return to another period of relative stability which was to last for one hundred years.

Thrace, Pantikapaion, 4th - 3rd cent. BC.
Obverse: Head and neck of bull facing 3/4 right. Reverse: Plough; ΠΑΝ below, palm branch above. Bronze. Diameter: 12 mm. Weight: 2.35 gr.
SNG Cop 33.
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 Posted 01/28/2021  6:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's an interesting coin Jim......
I really do like simple designs on both sides...
I enjoyed the write up and as always learnt something new from you , thanks!
What's a Stadia? I've googled it and still don't understand!?

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 Posted 01/29/2021  05:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Neat! I don't think this type is among the Pantikapaion coins I have, but that reverse design seems familiar, so maybe it is.

(Coin shops in Moscow apparently get such an overflow of Pantikapaion coins that I've more than once seen special bargain bins set up just for those. I've gotten bored of them long ago, especially as I tend to have trouble distinguishing the types.)
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 Posted 01/29/2021  07:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
What's a Stadia? I've googled it and still don't understand!?

Hi Paul,

The original footraces in the ancient Olympic games were over a distance of one stade or stadion, which was the equivalent of 600 Greek feet, or 180 metres.

Over the years the word for the footrace the "stade", was transferred to the place where the race was run, the "stadium". The circumference of the stadium being 600 Greek feet. It became normal to describe other distances in units of stadia.

Quote:
Neat! I don't think this type is among the Pantikapaion coins I have, but that reverse design seems familiar, so maybe it is.

There is another coin very similar, but on the reverse there is an ear of corn above the plough instead of a palm branch. With the design being familiar, I would imagine that you do indeed have one or the other.
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 Posted 01/29/2021  07:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yeah, seems to be a match (or very similar) on the reverse. Can't place the obverse though.



(Fun fact: the originals of those pics are from 2017. I just never got around to posting the coins from that batch on CCF.)
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