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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 03/24/2021  5:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Obverse: Two boars' heads confronted.
I've heard somewhere - not sure if that's actually true - that this obverse design is set up in such a way as to evoke a lion's head facing, even if that's technically not what is being depicted.
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 Posted 03/25/2021  2:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Got another bull in the mail.

Remi?, 10 BC-14 AD. Bronze, 2.46 g, 17 mm. Reverse inscription: GERMANICVS / INDVTILL[I.L]. RIC 249, RPC 506, La Tour 9248, Delestrée 707.



The Remi (if that is where this coin is from) was a Belgic tribe in and around the Ardennes. There is however many uncertainties around these coins. They are listed in both RIC and RPC as well as Gallic in Delestrée. One hypothesis is that they are provincial issues for some Gallic (otherwise unknown) chief Indutillos. Germanicus would be his mint master, and the inscription read as Germanicus Indutilli Libertus, that is, Germanicus, Indutillo's freedman.

In any event, they are clearly inspired by contemporary same size Roman quadrans minted in relatively nearby Lyon (Lugdunum), that have the same bull design, but of course shows emperor Octavian and has the inscription AVGVSTVS / DIVI.F arranged in the same way. I have no such coins, but this denarius from Lyon, 15-13 BC, has a very similar bull design.

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 Posted 03/29/2021  08:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Time for me to get caught up too.

Quote:
perhaps the most diverse page of the thread thus far: boars, eagles, snake, crayfish, bee, stag, bulls, and horse.

Indeed, Bob. The Gallic coins certainly added a new dimension to the thread.

Quote:
that this obverse design is set up in such a way as to evoke a lion's head facing

I hadn't heard of that one either, @january1may. It could well be intentional, as it does indeed resemble a lion's head facing.

Quote:
Got another bull in the mail

Another very interesting post, @erafjel. The coin has amazing detail, and the bull is magnificent.
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 Posted 03/29/2021  09:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
At the bottom of page 19 of this thread ( http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/...whichpage=19 ), there is a coin from Lampsakos that I had problems identifying. Was it Poseidon, Priapus or Zeus on the obverse? Different sites gave different descriptions. The reverse was listed as the fore-part of Pegasos, and the fore-part of Pegasos appeared to have a bird's tail.

Here is a similar coin from the same city, but with a Kerykeion instead of a head on the obverse and a similar fore-part of Pegasos (?) on the reverse. The vendor intimated that it was not Pegasos on the reverse, but a Hippalectryon (cock-horse) as it had the feathered bird's tail. According to all the information available on the Hippalectryon, it is apparently always shown with the hind legs of a cockerel as well.

Wildwinds and all the auction sites, list this type of coin as having a Pegasos reverse. It does raise the question; why does the Lampsakos Pegasos have a feathered rear end?

Provisional attribution:
Lampsakos - Mysia. 400-200 BC.
Obverse: Caduceus within wreath. Obverse Inscription: ΛA-M. Reverse: Hippalectryon (not Pegasos) right; dolphin below. (off flan) Reverse Inscription: Ψ-Α. Bronze. Diameter: 13 mm. Weight: 2.2 gr.
Reference: BMC 63
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 Posted 04/06/2021  12:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another coin from Lampsakos with the forepart of Pegasos or Hippalectryon reverse. All searches have brought up the reverse as Pegasos, but Lampsakos seems to be the only place where Pegasos has tail feathers. I'm leaning more towards the Hippalectryon now.

Most of this type of coin has a symbol below the Pegasos/Hippalectryon. They range from a mouse, to a bunch of grapes, a torch, a kerykeion, or the radiate head of Helios, but most say an uncertain symbol. From the blobby shape on this coin, it looks more like a mouse than any of the others.

The obverse also appears to have ΛΑΜ in front of the female head, and ΨΑ on the reverse, which is more in keeping with the 19mm diameter coins.

The closest match I could find was; https://www.cNGCoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=387028

The attribution for this coin was given as:
Lampsakos - Mysia. 400-200 BC
Obverse: Female head right, hair in sakkos. Reverse: Hippalectryon (not Pegasos) right; uncertain symbol below. Reverse Inscription: ΛΑΜ. Bronze. Diameter: 10 mm. Weight: 1.1 gr
Reference: SNG Cop 206-7 var. (symbol below)

For comparison, I've grouped all three of the Lampsakos coins with similar reverses. They all have tail feathers.
Edited by Novicius
04/06/2021 12:52 pm
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 Posted 04/06/2021  5:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting Jim....
These do seem different to the standard Pegasos which, when only the forepart is depicted, is cleanly cut with nothing being portrayed at the back of the horse...
There is another city where this style is shown it's in the same region Mysia, 'Adramytion'.
https://www.vcoins.com/en/stores/lo...Default.aspx

Three really nice coins
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 Posted 04/06/2021  6:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
There is another city where this style is shown it's in the same region Mysia, 'Adramytion'.

Thanks Paul. During an initial search, this one from London Ancient Coins came up on ACSearch. The description gave it as Adramytion or Lampsakos. There must be a few similarities between the cities. It is given the same reference as my coin; SNG Copenhagen 206-7.

https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=2431848

Mysia, Adramytion or Lampsakos (?), c. 4th-3rd century BC. Æ (9mm, 1.15g, 9h). Female head r. R/ Forepart of Pegasos r.; A above, ? (?) below. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 206-7 (Lampsakos). Green patina,
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United States
238 Posts
 Posted 04/10/2021  10:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ruger9a to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's my contribution to this topic. It's a quadrans of Domitian. Obv: Rhinoceros walking left. Rev: IMPDOMITAVCGERM surrounding a large SC. It was minted in Rome 84-85 AD. Diameter is 17mm and the weight is 2.4 grams. Reference number is RIC 435.

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 Posted 04/10/2021  10:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting update and speculation, Jim. And neat rhino, Ruger9a - a good addition to the thread.
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 Posted 04/10/2021  11:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Rhinoceros walking left

Wonderful addition, @Ruger9a!

Could have something to do with games involving wild animals in the then newly inaugurated Colosseum?
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 Posted 04/10/2021  11:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Numisma to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Remi?, 10 BC-14 AD. Bronze, 2.46 g, 17 mm. Reverse inscription: GERMANICVS / INDVTILL[I.L]. RIC 249, RPC 506, La Tour 9248, Delestrée 707.


erafjel, thank you! I have a lousier example of the same type, which I'd attributed as Roman provincial. I appreciate the background.



17.3 mm, 2.83 g.
Edited by Numisma
04/10/2021 11:13 am
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 Posted 04/11/2021  6:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I never expected to see a rhino here, so a nice surprise.

Thanks for posting @Ruger9a.
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 Posted 04/12/2021  7:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As many of the coins from Miletus (Miletos) feature lion's heads, stars, or stellate patterns, I tried to find out what the reason could be. The research led me to an article about a man called Thales, and perhaps his work influenced the designs?

Apart from being the richest city in Ionia, Miletus was home to Thales of Miletus from 624 to 546 BC. Thales is considered to be the world's first scientist and mathematician. From his experiments he surmised that the world was round, and he predicted an eclipse. His understanding and prediction of natural phenomena was done without any mythological explanations.

Thales died around the time that Cyrus the Great was busy expanding his Achaemenid Empire across Anatolia, but Miletus was held in high esteem, and no attempt was made to interfere with it's independence. This allowed Thales' followers to continue contemplation of the origin, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe. An apprentice of Thales, Anaximander, reasoned that there was no effect without cause, and well ahead of his time, reasoned that humans evolved from lower forms of sea life.

Around the time that this coin was minted, Anaximander's student, Anaximenes, took things even further, stating that besides a principle there had to be an active cause. He used the analogy of a coin, where silver alone was not enough to become a coin, but an active cause was required - a coin maker.

Ionia, Miletus. Diobol 520-470 BC
Obverse: Forepart of lion to right, head turned back to left. Reverse: Stellate design within square incuse. Silver. Diameter: 10 mm. Weight: 1.1 gr.
Reference: Klein 424; SNG von Aulock 2080; SNG Kayhan 476-482.
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 Posted 04/14/2021  6:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I do find these Miletus coins pretty!...Also an interesting collecting area as there seems to be a variety of types?....Very nice coin Jim and thanks for the write up as I didn't know about Anaximenes.
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 Posted 04/14/2021  6:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
As many of the coins from Miletus (Miletos) feature...He used the analogy of a coin, where silver alone was not enough to become a coin, but an active cause was required - a coin maker.


Ah, I see what you did there, Jim. You came full circle in your narrative this time. Getting fancy on us.

Super coin.
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