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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 06/02/2021  6:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jaymassive79 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

What an amazing thread!

Informative and some many amazing coins been shared!

I love how many animals were represented on Romam and ancient coins!

Here's my latest animal related Romam Follis Coin. I love the story behind the image.

In fact I'm considering focusing on coins bearing eagles for a bit.





Cheers Jay
Edited by jaymassive79
06/02/2021 6:06 pm
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 Posted 06/04/2021  9:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is a nice she-wolf with Romulus and Remus, and the back story is indeed interesting.

Collecting the animals can be very addictive though, as I know to my cost.

There are some really nice eagles out there, and you could make a neat collection with a few of them.

Good luck with the hunting,
Jim
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 Posted 06/12/2021  8:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, it's another Ephesos Bee/Stag bronze. Even though there are over 1,000 different varieties of the Bee/Stag coins, the only ones I've managed to bid on were around the 10 mm diameter size. This coin is 16 mm diameter, so I was happy to win it in a recent auction.

Ephesos - Ionia. 280-258 BC.
Obverse: Bee within laurel wreath, Ε-Φ either side. Reverse: Stag feeding right; quiver above. Bronze. Diameter: 16 mm. Weight: 3.61 gr.
Reference: SNG Cop 268-9 var.
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 Posted 06/13/2021  8:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I hadn't heard about the hostilities between the Lapiths and the Centaurs before, so researching this coin from Gyrton proved very interesting.

Gyrton was an ancient city even in Classical times, and was in mythology founded by Phlegyas, son of Ares, king of the legendary tribe of the Lapiths. He was also the father of Ixion, and Koronis, mother of Asklepios. The city was the original home of the Phlegyae, and the name is thought to be in honour of either the hero Gyrton, brother of Phlegyas, or his sister the nymph Gyrtone.

The story of the Lapiths and the Centaurs began in an Archaic setting in which Gyrton was one of a cluster of communities in the Dotion Pedion, whose influence encompassed not just adjoining regions but also the Apollo sanctuary at Delphi.

The city was situated in a fertile plain between the rivers Titaresius and Peneius, and the walls were built with slate. The acropolis and the lower city were fortified, possibly as far back as the Archaic Period. The Gyrtonians are mentioned among the Thessalians who sent aid to the Athenians at the commencement of the Peloponnesian War.

Gyrton emerges in various forms of evidence as a significant community in the Classical and Hellenistic period, influential both inside Thessaly and beyond. Gyrton minted silver and bronze coins in the 4th century BC; the coins bearing the legend ΓΥΡΤΩΝΙΩΝ. Many coins, in addition to the equine motifs so common on Thessalian coinage also feature youthful male and female heads, which have been identified as the hero Gyrton and the nymph Gyrtone respectively.

Gyrton - Thessaly. 300-196 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right. Reverse: Horse trotting right, grain ear below. Reverse Inscription: ΓYΡT-ΩNIΩN. Bronze. Diameter: 21 mm. Weight: 7 gr
Reference: Rogers 232
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 Posted 06/13/2021  11:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Enjoyed the updates, Jim. Congrats on the scaled-up bee/stag.
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 Posted 07/02/2021  12:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Bob.

I didn't have a piglet in the menagerie, so I bid on this fairly rare coin from Eleusis. It is not in very good condition, but the research was really interesting and apparently these coins are also known as Eleusinian Festival Coinage. All the coins on the Wildwinds Eleusis page have a similar figure of Triptolemos seated left in winged car obverse, with a pig/piglet on the reverse. The only coin that differs has the head of Demeter on the obverse and a plemochoe (a narrow, covered bowl on a high stem) resting on a cista mystica reverse.

Map is from a small section of page 59 of the Barrington Atlas.

This paragraph is from "This Little Piggy Went to Market: Boars, Hogs, Sows and Piglets on Ancient Coins" by Mike Markowitz in CoinWeek.
"The pig was sacred to Demeter, goddess of grain, and figures prominently on special coinage struck by Athens for use by participants in the Eleusinian Mysteries, a series of very ancient secret rituals held every Spring at Eleusis (now Elefsina, 18 km, or 11 miles, from Athens). Pigs were sacrificed to Demeter as part of the preparation for initiates...Each had carried to the river or lake a little pig, which was also purified by bathing, and on the next day this pig was sacrificed. The pig was offered because it was very pernicious to cornfields. On the Eleusinian coinage, the pig, standing on a torch placed horizontally, appears as the sign and symbol of the Mysteries."

I was not familiar with Triptolemos, but found this in another article:
"Triptolemos was a demigod of the Eleusinian mysteries who presided over the sowing of grain-seed and the milling of wheat. His name means He who Pounds the Husks. In myth, Triptolemos was one of the Eleusinian princes who kindly received Demeter when she came mourning the loss of her daughter Persephone. The young goddess was eventually returned to her from the Underworld, and Demeter in her munificence, instructed Triptolemos in the art of agriculture, and gave him a winged chariot drawn by serpents so that he might travel the world spreading her gift."

Attica, Eleusis. 350-300 BC.
Obverse: Triptolemos seated left in winged car drawn by two serpents holding two ears of corn. Reverse: Piglet standing right on mystic staff, dolphin right in exergue. Reverse Inscription: EΛEYΣI. Bronze. Diameter: 15 mm. Weight: 3.4 gr.
Reference: BMC 19.
Edited by Novicius
07/02/2021 12:56 pm
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 Posted 07/02/2021  6:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Neat looking coin Jim!
I see you're using your new Atlas Very nice!
Interesting article about Triptolemos, always come away from your posts having learnt something new Jim,Thanks!
Nice addition to your zoo....Paul
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 Posted 07/02/2021  8:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Interesting article
Nice addition




Good update. Learning a lot here.
Edited by Bob L
07/02/2021 8:59 pm
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 Posted 07/03/2021  09:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Paul and Bob.

I really enjoy the journeys that these little coins take me on. There is always something new for me to learn. I guess the only time we stop learning is when they place us in the box!

The Barrington Atlas is proving to be extremely helpful. It is packed full of information and detail. Here is a shot of of it in front of a three-seater settee.

Jim
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 Posted 07/22/2021  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The two coins below, while not in great condition interested me in a couple of ways. Firstly they were minted in Seuthopolis in Thrace, the city founded by Seuthes III (c. 341-300 B.C.) as the capital of the Odrysian kingdom. It was not a true polis, but the seat of Seuthes and his court. Seuthopolis was unusual in that most of the space was occupied by official structures and not by homes, with the majority of the populace living outside the city. Seuthes' palace functioned also as a sanctuary of the Cabeiri, the gods of Samothrace. (The Cabeiri were mentioned in my earlier post "Troas, Birytis - Kabeiros And Club".) The dual role of Seuthes' palace as royal court and sanctuary, indicates that Seuthes was a priest-king: the high priest of the Cabeiri among the Odrysian Thracians.

The cemetery of Seuthopolis included a number of brick tholos tombs, some covered by tumuli, in which the upper-class were interred, sometimes along with their horses. The less affluent were cremated, with modest grave goods laid alongside.

The second point of interest for me, is that Seuthopolis may yet see the light of day again, as above, if the funding can be obtained. The ruins of the city were discovered during the construction of the Koprinka Reservoir in 1948, but the decision was made to carry on with the construction and flood the dam, leaving Seuthopolis at it's bottom. However, in the 1980s when the reservoir was emptied for repairs to the dam, archaeologists from the Kazanlak Museum of History "Iskra" found that the walls of the structures in Seuthopolis had been preserved on the bottom of the artificial lake. Also, thanks to the detailed archaeological excavations in the early 1950s, modern-day Bulgarian archaeologists have all the necessary information to restore the ancient city which covers approximately 12.5 acres.


Seuthes III, king of the Odrysians, AE Unit, Seuthopolis c. 324-316 B.C.
Obverse: Eagle standing right with closed wings. Reverse: ΣEY-ΘOY within wreath. Bronze. Diameter: 16mm. Weight: 2.01gm.
SNG Stancomb 292. Youroukova 97. Peter 3.1.2.
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 Posted 07/22/2021  10:17 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's an interesting proposed project. It would certainly represent a lot of work and investment.

Thanks for sharing the history and pics of the AE's, Seuthes III x 2.
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 Posted 07/22/2021  5:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lovely coins since my last addition! Very interesting about pigs and the Eleusinian mysteries, @Novicius.

This recent Gallic acquisition shows a wolf and an ox skull (bucranium). Wolves were important in Celtic/Gallic mythology, representing vigor, death, and channels to divinities and other worlds. What it represents here is unclear - what does it mean that it has its tail between its legs, a sign of fear or submission? And what is the relation to the ox skull, which is a sacrificial symbol for both Celts and Romans?

Pictones, after 40 BC. Bronze, 1.70 g, 14 mm. Obverse inscription: CONTOVTOS. La Tour 4316, Delestrée 3721.



The Pictones were a Gallic tribe south of the Loire river. The dating is very uncertain, but the male portrait is clearly Roman (Gaul was conquered by Caesar and became a Roman province 51 BC). Perhaps a chief of the Pictones, named Contoutos, who liked to style himself like the conquerors?

I also posted another Gallic coin in the Mythology on Coins thread, showing a sort of griffon. Look here if you want to see that one.
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 Posted 07/23/2021  11:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fascinating Jim!....
You do pick up some interesting types...Thanks for sharing!
https://complexlazur.com/en/koprinka-dam/

@erafjel...I Like those coins...Maybe even a portrait of caesar himself, that would be a thing!
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 Posted 07/27/2021  11:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
That's an interesting proposed project. It would certainly represent a lot of work and investment.

It would be amazing if it did come to fruition, but the costs would indeed be astronomical, Bob.

Quote:
This recent Gallic acquisition shows a wolf and an ox skull (bucranium).

A very interesting coin raising quite a few questions, @erafjel. I wonder if there will ever be any answers?

Quote:
You do pick up some interesting types...Thanks for sharing!

Thanks Paul. I have been looking for a decent octopus to add to the menagerie, and I think this will be the best I can do with the budget I have. Sicilian sea creatures appear to demand high prices.

My only other octopus coin is also from Syracuse in Sicily but not in very good shape, so I was pleased when this one came my way. Arethusa is facing right this time, and has nice detail even though it appears to be a light strike.

Sicily Syracuse. Under Hieron I. 478-466 B.C.
AR Litra c. 470-466 B.C.
Obverse: Head of Arethusa right, wearing diadem of pearls; border of dots. ΣVRA (R retrograde). Reverse: Octopus. Silver. Diameter: 12-13mm. Weight: 0.58gm.
Boehringer 460.
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 Posted 07/28/2021  6:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A very nice coin Jim!

Quote:
Sicilian sea creatures appear to demand high prices.

Yes completely agree! An octopus was on my want list last year until I saw the price!.......Your coin is well centered with a really cool looking octopus, but I also think the portrait of Arethusa is well detailed for the type too...Interesting with the retrograde 'R'..Is this common?
All in all a nice looking coin congrats and thanks for sharing....Paul
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