Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

My First Animal On A Coin.

First page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 486 / Views: 33,796Next Topic
Page: of 33
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2600 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2022  03:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Super coin Jim!
Lovely depiction of the crayfish! Wow what detail on such a small canvas...Thanks for the write up..
Paul.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 06/08/2022  1:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Just got caught up on the posts. Great info as always.

Thanks, Bob. I do like your new avatar, it is very effective.

Quote:
Thanks for the write up.

Thanks, Paul. I managed to get the three volume set of the first English translation of "Geography of Strabo" published by Hamilton & Falconer, 1854-57. There is some really interesting stuff in them.

Not knowing anything about the Odrysian Kingdom, I was looking forward to researching this not very common coin of Sparadokos (Sparadocus) with it's horse forepart, eagle and snake. The journey was confusing, interesting, and many differences of opinion were found, though Sparadokos was acknowledged as the first of the Odrysians to strike coinage.

I didn't find much about Sparadokos apart from the fact that he was the first born son of Teres I, the first Odrysian king, who reigned from 460 BC to when he died during a military campaign in 445 BC. Sparadokos was the older brother of Sitalces the second king of the Odrysians, and father of the third king, Seuthes I. Some authorities believe that the Odrysians followed the principle of tanisti in the succession, and that Seuthes as the son of Sitalce's older brother may have had an earlier claim over Sitalce's sons.

Sparadokos' place in the hierarchy is unclear, as his younger brother Sitalces took the throne on the death of their father in 445 BC. Sitalces ruled till his death in 424 BC during a failed campaign against Triballi, then Sparadokos' son, Seuthes I became king. Some sites identify Sparadokos as a king, but ancient historians do not identify him as one of the Thracian kings. The numismatic evidence indicates he was likely a co-ruler with Sitalkes. but remains enigmatic for historical research.

Quite a few twists and turns regarding the mint were encountered, and there were a few differences of opinion found. One author postulated that the flying eagle holding a serpent in his beak was very characteristic of the mint of the Macedonian city of Olynthos, and that Sparadokos struck his coins there. Another said that the horse on the obverse of this coin may demonstrate the influence of the mint of Maroneia, which is also very well attested in the coins of the Odrysian rulers of the 4th century BC. Psoma attributed some coins to the mint of Sermylia. According to Psoma the weight standard of Sparadokos' coins is similar to that of Ainos (Persian for the small denominations and Attic for the tetradrachms). She believes that Sparadokos ruled in the hinterland of Ainos

Thrace, The Odrysian Kingdom: Sparadokos. c. 464 - 444 B.C
Obverse: Forepart of horse galloping left, ΣΠ-A. Reverse: Eagle with outspread wings and snake, head left: all within shallow incuse square.
Silver. Diameter: 11 mm. Weight: 1.23 gr.
BMC Thrace: Kings of Thrace, p. 201, 1. Youroukova, The Coins of the Ancient Thracians (Oxford, 1976) 20.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2600 Posts
 Posted 06/10/2022  03:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's another nice interesting coin Jim..
Thoroughly enjoyed the story and particularly like the detail of the Eagle reverse...
Great addition to your well researched collection.
Paul
Pillar of the Community
United States
6426 Posts
 Posted 06/10/2022  10:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Terrific coin and interesting write-up. Another one of those regions in the Greek world where the history is a bit murky.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 06/16/2022  1:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
particularly like the detail of the Eagle reverse...

Thanks, Paul. It is one a the few tiny silvers that I've found with decent detail.

Quote:
Another one of those regions in the Greek world where the history is a bit murky.

Indeed, Bob. I've come across a few of these recently. The coin posted today went up somewhat of a blind alley.

In direct contrast to the previous coin, I found a huge amount of information regarding Perdiccas, Regent of Asia 323-320 BC, who had this coin struck in the name of Alexander III (The Great). However there is virtually nothing regarding the coin it's self. It is a typical Macedonian design, with Herakles on the obverse and a horse and rider on the reverse. Perdiccas (Perdikkas) was the first of the Diadochi. Hopefully this brief resume illustrates the kind of man that he was.

Perdiccas was born around 360 BC, the son of a Macedonian nobleman named Orontes, in Orestis. Though his exact date of birth is not known he would have been of a similar age to Alexander, and was to become his friend. He was fiercely loyal to Alexander and was commander of one of Alexander's phalanx battalions. Perdiccas served with distinction in Alexander's campaigns, and on a couple of occasions he was severely injured, but recovered, and in 333 BC was considered important enough to take charge of an independent command. When Alexander had to leave the siege of the city of Tyre, Perdiccas was left in charge of the war.

For a period of almost two years Perdiccas was not mentioned in any campaigns, but he had become one of Alexander's seven adjutants, who were in reality bodyguards.

In 327/326, during the Indian campaign, Perdiccas was now a cavalry commander. Tradition has it that Perdiccas was the only one who dared to help Alexander when he was wounded during the siege of the town of the Mallians.

In August of 324 BC, Alexander's senior commander, Craterus, was sent to bring back 11,500 veterans to Europe, when on his return he would become supreme commander of the Macedonian forces. A couple of months later, Alexander's other senior commander Hephaestion died unexpectedly, and Perdiccas found himself to be the highest ranking officer at Alexander's court.

In Babylon during the afternoon of 11 June 323, after being ill for several days, Alexander died. He had given his ring to Perdiccas, saying that he gave his empire to the "strongest". Some thought that he meant Craterus, but nobody really knew what he meant. Perdiccas wanted to wait and see if Alexander's pregnant first wife, Roxane, delivered a son, as he would logically be the new king. The commander of the phalanx, Meleager, pointed out that Alexander's illegitimate brother, Arridaeus, was the first in line of succession, even though he was weak minded and mentally incapable of ruling. To avoid a civil war, both sides agreed to a compromise that Perdiccas was to act as regent for king Arridaeus, and Roxane's unborn child, if it was in fact to be a son.

Later, seeing that Perdiccas could possibly lay claim to the crown, Antipater, Craterus, and Antigonus Monophtalmus agreed to revolt against him. Ptolemy, the satrap of Egypt, provoked a conflict in December 321 BC by kidnapping the body of Alexander in Syria and sending it to Memphis, later to be transferred to Alexandria, a provocation that Perdiccas could not ignore. Perdiccas and Ptolemy had quarrelled bitterly since Babylon, and Perdiccas believed he had little choice but to invade Egypt, defeat Ptolemy and seize both his territory and his treasury. However, during the three futile attempts to cross the Nile he lost 2,000 soldiers. A mutiny broke out amongst Perdiccas' troops, who were disheartened by this failure, and Perdiccas was murdered by his officers, Peithon, Antigenes, and Seleucus.

I found two similar coins on ACSearch, https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=2532528 , and https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=150771 , both with Herakles obverses, horse and rider reverses, and the same legends and devices as my coin, but 6.46 gr and 6.47gr in weight (Price refers to these as Units - 6 grams). Another similar coin was https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=150772 with the Herkles obverse and a horse and rider reverse, but without the ΑΛΕ, B-A and the head of kerykeion, weighing in at 2.91 gr which is closer to mine at 3.65 gr (Half Unit?).

The Macedonian Empire: Perdiccas, as Regent of the Empire and Supreme Commander of the Imperial Army in Asia, 323-321 B.C. Half-Unit, mint in Asia Minor.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles right. Reverse: ΑΛΕ (to upper left); rider, himation flying behind, on horse in high gallop right; below to right, head of kerykeion between B - A. Bronze. Diameter: 20-21mm, Weight: 3.65gm.
Cf. Price 372b.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 07/01/2022  11:27 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another griffin from Abdera. Unfortunately most of the griffin's head is off-flan. Researching this coin has proved interesting, as all the others that I've found have the bust of Apollo within a linear square border. There is one coin on ACSearch without the linear border, but it is this same coin. (Ex Gitbud & Naumann) https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=1905247

Abdera was located on the coast of Thrace near the mouth of the Nestos River. It was initially colonised by the people of Teos after evacuating Ionia when it was overrun by the Persians under Cyrus (c. 540 BC). They were initially successful in developing a brisk trade with the Thracian interior, and became a prosperous member of the Delian League in the 5th century BC.

The years around the time when this coin was struck were troubling for Abdera, as these brief extracts from The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites explains:
"Abdera was subjugated by the Persians during their period of action in Thrace and in 492 B.C. It was used as a base of operations (Hdt. 6.46,47; 7.120). As a member of the First Athenian Alliance, it contributed to the Athenian treasury the sum of 10 to 15 talents, starting in 454 B.C. This heavy taxation and the rich silver currency are an indication of the economic prosperity of the city."

"In 376 B.C. Abdera was destroyed by the invasion of the Thracian tribe of the Triballi, who killed all the citizens who took part in the battle (Diod. Sic. 15.36). A little later, ca. 350 B.C., Philip II of Macedon conquered the city. About the 3d century B.C. it fell successively to King Lysimachos of Thrace, to the Seleucids, the Ptolemies, and again to the Macedonians, who dominated it until 196 B.C., when the Romans declared it a free state. Abdera suffered a second catastrophe in 170 B.C., when the Roman armies and those of Eumenes II, king of Pergamon besieged and sacked it (Diod. Sic. 30.6). During Roman Imperial times, it lost political importance and went into decline."

Strabo's account is more poetic:
"Teos is situated on a peninsula, and has a port. Anacreon, the lyric poet, was a native of this place; in his time, the Teians, unable to endure the insults and injuries of the Persians, abandoned Teos, and removed to Abdera, whence originated the verse -- Abdera, the beautiful colony of the Teians."

The philosophers Protagoras and Democritus were citizens of Abdera. The site is now occupied by the modern town of Avdhira, Greece.

Thrace, Abdera. 385-347 BC. Trichalkon. Magistrate Ermostrates.
Obverse: Griffin rampant left. ABΔΗ ΡΙΤΩΝ. Reverse: Laureate head of Apollo right, within shallow circular incuse. ΕΠΙΕ ΡΜΟΣ ΤΡΑ ΤΟΥ. Bronze. Diameter: 17-19mm. Weight: 6.32gm.
Apparently unrecorded transitional issue - Var of BMC 89; AMNG 181; Moushmov 2463, all of which have the reverse image in a linear square border.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2600 Posts
 Posted 07/03/2022  10:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lovely couple of additions Jim...
As you know this isn't an area I actively collect in but I do follow your threads intently and find them really interesting and informative..Thanks...
Keep em coming.
Pillar of the Community
United States
6426 Posts
 Posted 07/03/2022  1:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Informative write-up and another interesting coin as usual, Jim. Enjoyed the update.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2022  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks again, Paul and Bob.

It has been a while since I picked up a dolphin coin, so I was quite pleased when these two coins came along. They are miniscule and weigh next to nothing, but I do have a fascination for these tiny coins. They must have been incredibly easy to lose, and what could such a small coin have bought?

One of the islands off Thrace, Thasos is the northernmost Greek island. The largest town is also called Thasos, or as it is officially known now, Limenas Thasou, "Port of Thasos". According to Strabo, Thasos was founded by Parians. The island has a rich mining history which can be traced as far back as the Palaeolithic age. In 2016, a radiocarbon dating conducted on remnants from Tzines yielded an age of 20350160 years, making the mine the oldest to have been discovered in Europe (Levato, 2016).

Over the millennia, gold, silver, iron, lead, zinc, manganese, barite and marble have been extracted. Ochre, a mixture of ferric oxide and varying amounts of clay and sand, has also been extracted from the island and used in pigments. The only active mining these days is the renowned white marbles of Thasos that have been used in construction since antiquity.

Thracian Islands: Thasos. c. 500-480 B.C.
Hemiobol, minted at the city of Thasos. Obverse: Dolphin swimming right between pellets. Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square of millsail pattern. Silver. Diameter: 8mm, Weight: 0.30gm. Reference: BMC 23.

Thracian Islands: Thasos. c. 500-480 B.C.
Tetartemorion (Eighth-Hekte, Quarter-Obol) Minted at the city of Thasos. Obverse: Two dolphins swimming in opposite directions right and left around three pellets. Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square. Silver. Diameter: 7mm, Weight: 0.18gm.
Apparently unpublished, but cf. BMC 18-21 (hemiobols).

Both coins pictured on a thumb to show relative size.
Pillar of the Community
United States
6426 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2022  3:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Those are some tiny dolphins. Impressive AR fractions, Jim.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Sweden
1135 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2022  6:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow, those are impressive in their tinyness! And beautiful - when I see a minuscule coin like this, I marvel at the skill of the die cutter, being able to create such a tiny piece of true art.

Quote:
what could such a small coin have bought?

Salaries and purchasing power in different time periods is something that interests me, so let's have a go at what a hemiobol might buy you in Thasos 500 BC!

According to various sources, an ordinary daily salary was 1 drachma (12 hemiobols). An obol bought you a loaf of bread, so a hemiobol, half a loaf I guess.

Disregarding the numismatic value, what would the 0.3 g silver hemiobol buy you today? Its current silver value is about 20 c, which will buy you 1/8 of a pound of white pan bread (according to Internet sources). Was half a Thasos bread loaf 1/2 pound? Then bread has become more expensive over the years.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2600 Posts
 Posted 08/04/2022  5:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
"Atchooo!"....Don't sneeze Jim..
Wow these are tiny! Nice pod....
Surely these "wee uns" would have been bagged up via weight?
Nice additions Jim
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 08/05/2022  11:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Those are some tiny dolphins. Impressive AR fractions, Jim.

Thanks, Bob. They are the tiniest dolphins so far.

Quote:
Disregarding the numismatic value, what would the 0.3 g silver hemiobol buy you today? Its current silver value is about 20 c, which will buy you 1/8 of a pound of white pan bread (according to Internet sources). Was half a Thasos bread loaf 1/2 pound? Then bread has become more expensive over the years.

An interesting point @erafjel. I wonder what the ancients would think, if they knew how much these tiny coins would sell for a couple of millennia later? Probably enough to keep them in bread for a year or more.

Quote:
"Atchooo!"....Don't sneeze Jim..

I wouldn't want to go shopping on a windy day back then, Paul. Even in a leather bag they could possibly get lost between the stitches. There would have to be an awful lot of the Tetartemorions in a bag for it to have any weight at all.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
791 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  1:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Inspired by Paul's (Palouche) tetradrachms with their magnificent eagles, I've added this one to the "animals" themed collection. It looked really nice on VCoins, and is really beautiful in hand.

Vendor's note:
The titulature ANTIOXIA SC suggests that the Senate of Antioch not only demonstrated its independence from Rome, but that it also had its own "imperial compass" under Philip. Even when Philip II was appointed Augustus - his father's titles were still stamped on the reverse, as on this tetradrachm with the fourth consular title. Budding collectors often have difficulty distinguishing between the busts of the father and the son. There is a simple rule: the father always has a wrinkle on his forehead, the son always a smooth forehead.

Marcus Iulius Severus Philippus II Caesar. 248/249 AD
Obverse: Draped and cuirassed bust of Philippus II with laurel wreath to the right. Inscription: ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Μ ΙΟΥΛΙ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟC CEΒ
Reverse: Eagle standing facing, head and tail left, with wings spread, holding wreath in beak. Inscription: ΔΗΜΑΡΧ EΞΟΥCΙΑC ΥΠΑ ΤΟ Δ ANTIOXIA S C
Billon. Diameter: 27mm. Weight: 11.04g. Mint: Antiochia ad Orontem, Syria Phoenice.
Reference: Prieur 473 (98 ex)
Edited by Novicius
08/19/2022 1:18 pm
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
2600 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  5:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's a great looking coin Jim
Lovely detail and well balanced, both sides being nicely centred. Yep these type Tetradrachms are really pleasing in hand...Congrats on the new addition.Is it that golden colour in hand?
Page: of 33 Previous TopicReplies: 486 / Views: 33,796Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2022 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.47 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: