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My First Animal On A Coin.

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 Posted 06/24/2020  7:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Looking at the state of the majority of governments nowadays I'd vote for the 'Hooters'!
This was one of the 1st types I looked at for my Olympian set and really like the reverse design....

Yes Paul, owls are said to be wise, so I don't understand why a group of them would be a parliament? The Athena coin you chose for your "The Twelve Olympian Gods" thread is a beauty.

The coin below is another one from Ephesos - Ionia, similar to the one I posted previously. This one is a scarcer variation with the female head (Artemis?) facing right.

Ephesos - Ionia. 305-288 BC.
Obverse: Female head right. Reverse: Bee. Reverse Inscription: E Φ. Bronze. Diameter: 10 mm. Weight: 1.4 gr. Reference: BMC 68-70 (var. head right).
Valued Member
United Kingdom
300 Posts
 Posted 06/27/2020  11:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In the hand this is a nice little coin, the images don't do it justice, and it was within my budget. I hadn't seen many of these Sicily - Akragas coins with a lot of detail, and those that I did see were all outside of my budget. All in all I'm pretty happy with my purchase, so now to find a reasonable crab.

Sicily - Akragas, 338 - 287 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus left. Reverse: Eagle left, wings spread, holding in its talons a hare, which it attacks with its beak. Diameter: 15 mm. Weight: 4.4 gr. Sear 1028.
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5094 Posts
 Posted 06/27/2020  8:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fine addition, Jim. Details are softened but easy enough to see. Referring to the discussion earlier (your "Filing" thread), on the obverse above you can see where the molten bronze entered and exited the mold for the flan (12:00 and 6:00, or vice versa). After filling the space for this flan, the bronze would have continued down the channel to the next one. See the top diagram ("a") here: https://www.forumancientcoins.com/n...asp?key=Flan

Valued Member
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300 Posts
 Posted 06/28/2020  09:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bob. The image on the page linked above didn't show. Maybe because I'm not a member?

The edge images here at "12 o'clock" and "6 o'clock" do show the entry and exit points as raised nodules or dimples though.

Jim

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 Posted 06/28/2020  10:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's that image, Jim.

Valued Member
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300 Posts
 Posted 06/28/2020  10:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks again Bob. The coin I have must have been made with the first (a) tree method. Even the ancients were multi-tasking, so mass production is nothing new.

Jim
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 Posted 07/01/2020  12:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The oddest addition to the menagerie has to be the mythological Hippocamp. It is seen here on the reverse of this Litra coin of Dionysios I from Syracuse in Sicily. Dionysios I or Dionysios the Elder (430-367 BC) was a Greek tyrant with the title Strategos Autokrator. As Strategos Autokrator he he could basically do whatever he wanted, while he still remained accountable for his actions.

Dionysios I. Syracuse - Sicily. After 410 BC
Obverse: Head of Athena left,wearing Corinthian helmet with olive wreath; dolphin before and behind. Obverse Inscription: ΣΥΡΑ. Reverse: Hippocamp left; reins trailing. Litra. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 5.8 gr. Sear #: 1193, Calciati 44.
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 Posted 07/01/2020  3:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thq to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I finally won a Mysian tunny. I'll post a picture when it arrives.
"Two minutes ago I would have sold my chances for a tired dime." Fred Astaire
Edited by thq
07/01/2020 3:56 pm
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1931 Posts
 Posted 07/01/2020  6:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You've been picking up some nice coins lately Jim but I really like that Hippocamp reverse! ....Syracuse is an amazing place, don't know if you've been there before but if not it's a place I would really recommend visiting if you ever get the chance....I was there about 25 years ago..Incredible!...

Time for a group photo of the menagerie or no? ........Paul
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 Posted 07/01/2020  7:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I finally won a Mysian tunny. I'll post a picture when it arrives.

Congratulations @thq. I look forward to seeing the picture.

I've been lucky in my quest for animal coins so far Paul, but there are a few that I didn't manage to get. There is a sphinx reverse that should be arriving soon though. I haven't been to Syracuse, but I've seen some stunning images of the ruins and ancient architecture. I believe that classical plays are still held in the Greek Theatre every year. That would be an amazing experience.

Quote:
Time for a group photo of the menagerie or no?

That is a good idea. I'll have to see what I can do.

Jim
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 Posted 07/02/2020  11:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great looking hippocamp, Jim.
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 Posted 07/03/2020  7:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bob.

I like this coin, not only for the serpent entwined round the staff of Asklepios, but because it has the portrait of Asklepios on the obverse as well.

From Wikipedia:
Asclepios is a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. He is the son of Apollo and Coronis, or Arsinoe, or of Apollo alone. Asclepios represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia ("Hygiene", the goddess of cleanliness), Laso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso (the goddess of the healing process), Aegle (the goddess of good health), Panacea (the goddess of universal remedy), and several sons. He was associated with the Roman/Etruscan god Vediovis and the Egyptian Imhotep. He shared with Apollo the epithet Paean ("The Healer"). The rod of Asclepios, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today. Those physicians and attendants who served this god were known as the Therapeutae of Asclepius.

Pergamon - Mysia. 200-113 BC.
Obverse: Bearded head of Asklepios right. Reverse: Serpent-entwined staff of Asklepios. Reverse Inscription: AΣKΛHΠIOY ΣΩTHΡOΣ. Bronze. Diameter: 17 mm. Weight: 3.7 gr.
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 Posted 07/04/2020  5:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another nice coin Jim with lovely green patina!
I get that 'AΣKΛHΠIOY' spells the gods name 'ASKLEPIOY'
But am I right in thinking that ΣΩTHΡOΣ (SOTEROS) means something like 'saviour'?.....Cool coin!....Paul
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 Posted 07/04/2020  7:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...lovely green patina!




Valued Member
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300 Posts
 Posted 07/04/2020  7:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you Paul and Bob.

Quote:
But am I right in thinking that ΣΩTHΡOΣ (SOTEROS) means something like 'saviour'?

I believe that is correct Paul. In the Seleucid Empire the title Soter stood for "The Saviour".

I found this coin to be of particular interest. I was taken by the rather nice eagle reverse, and the fact that Perseus was connected to the Seleucid Empire by his marriage to Laodice V.

The eldest son of Philip V, Perseus was the last king (Basileus) of Macedon. He inherited a kingdom already largely dependent on Rome, but his policies aroused Roman suspicions and armed conflict became inevitable. At the battle of Pydna, in 168 BC, Perseus lost his kingdom and he died two years later as an exile in Italy.

In 178 BC, he had married Laodice V, the daughter of Seleucus IV from Syria. One son of Perseus and Laodice, Alexander, was still a child when Perseus was conquered by the Romans. He was kept in custody at Alba Fucens together with his father, became a skilful metalworker, learned the Latin language, and became a public notary.

Interestingly, Perseus whom, according to mythology founded Macedonia, has the same name as the last king of Macedonia.

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 172 - 168 BC.
Obverse: Head of the hero Perseus right, wearing winged cap terminating in bird's head. Reverse: Eagle, wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head right;
BA above, monogram left. Bronze. Diameter 18 mm. Weight: 6.7 gr. Sear 6807v.
Edited by Novicius
07/04/2020 7:54 pm
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