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How Far Back Can We Go? Sixth Edition!

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 Posted 11/25/2020  1:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
6 Deniers from France dated 1711

Nice That one is still on my wish list. Made out of copper from old warship cannons.
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 Posted 11/25/2020  4:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Made out of copper from old warship cannons.


Well now I have learned something today about one of my coins. Thx!
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
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 Posted 11/25/2020  5:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1711 or 1712?

And I am also glad to learn what @erafjel mentioned, as I have an an example of this type, but with an unreadable date.
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 Posted 11/25/2020  5:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@tdz, I'm pretty sure it is dated 1711--see below for a close-up of the date. The engraving is a bit rough plus this coin has seen some hard living, so I can't say for sure that the last digit to the left of the fleur-de-lis is a number 1. What do you think?


"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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 Posted 11/25/2020  5:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Time for me to get new glasses
On the earlier photo that last digit near the fleur-de-lis really looked like a 2, but in the blowup 1 makes more sense.
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 Posted 11/25/2020  6:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Definitely a '1'. The 1712's have a rather wide '2', much like tdziemia's 1712 teston.
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 Posted 11/26/2020  12:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add pepactonius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1710 -- Spanish Netherlands / County of Namur, 1 liard:



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 Posted 11/26/2020  12:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add pepactonius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1710 -- Margraviate of Brandenburg-Bayreuth, 1/24 thaler:



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 Posted 11/26/2020  06:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
France 1710, écu, Louis XIV, Lyon (D).




This became the last series of silver coins for the aged Louis XIV, who had sat on the throne of France since 1643 (then only 5 years old). He passed away 1715, to be succeded by his great grandson Louis XV, also he becoming king at the age of 5.

These écus replaced the series minted starting in 1704. There was reluctance to perform yet an overstrike in 1709 - there were examples of coins having gone through three or even four consecutive overstrikes, becoming hard to recognize. The arrival of a large shipment of silver from South America definitely tipped the decision in favor of using new flans, mixing the new silver with that from melted down old coins. The new écus were a bit heavier than the previous ones: 30.6 g instead of 27.5 g. Their value was initially set to 4 livres 16 sols but after only a month raised to 5 livres. The old écus were demonetized at the same time at a rate of 3 livres 7 sols.
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 Posted 11/26/2020  07:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wait, we're up to 1710 already? Good thing I've checked...



France, Louis XIV, 30 deniers (mousquetaire), 1710, Metz mint.

This type is occasionally believed to be colonial (and is listed as such in the Red Book), but apparently evidence suggests it wasn't.
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 Posted 11/26/2020  08:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
This type is occasionally believed to be colonial ... but apparently evidence suggests it wasn't

They were not purely colonial for sure, they were used all over France. There is some information about them being used extensively in Canada as well, but I don't know how well-founded that is.
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 Posted 11/26/2020  11:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Really nice series of ecus @erafjel along with the monetary history of that time.

One of the wars that had ruined Louis XIV's treasury and caused those successive currency reforms was the War of the Spanish Succession, which created the confusion I mentioned earlier in the coins of Namur:

Quote:
@pepactonius: 1712 County of Namur, 1 liard

@tdz: I have Namur for 1709, but with a different coat of arms reverse, different legends, etc. Time for some research


Namur was part of the Spanish Netherlands, which were invaded in 1701 at the beginning of the war of the Spanish Succession. This Wikipedia excerpt on rulers of Namur explains what happened next:
<i>Between 1706 and 1714 Namur was invaded by the English and the Dutch during the War of the Spanish Succession. The fief was claimed by the House of Habsburg and the House of Bourbon. In 1712 Luxembourg and Namur were ceded to Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria by his French allies, but with the end of the war in 1713 with the Treaty of Utrecht Max. Emanuel was restored as Elector of Bavaria. The Treaty of Utrecht also settled the succession, and the Margraviate of Namur went to the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, along with the rest of the Spanish Netherlands.</i>

So, pepactonius' 1712 Namur coin was issued in the name of Max Emmanuel of Bavaria, and bears only the heraldry of Namur (rampant lions) and Bavaria (the KM#17 listing in NGCcoin.com has the correct picture, but an incorrect description of the coin in the picture).
Today's 1710 Namur coin was issued in the name of Philip V, the first Bourbon King of Spain, and has the traditional obverse heraldry for this type with the shields of Austria, Burgundy and Brabant, and the arms of Spain reverse. And tomorrow we will have one with Philip's image.


Edited by tdziemia
11/26/2020 12:31 pm
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 Posted 11/26/2020  2:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice context on Namur @tdz. Here is a brother to @pep's coin, although mine has the date around the rim rather than bookending the Spanish coat of arms:





"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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 Posted 11/26/2020  11:11 pm  Show Profile   Check paralyse's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add paralyse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1710 - Threepence - Queen Anne

Longhorn Coins & Exonumia
Member ANA - EAC - TNA - SSDC - CCT #890

"Most of the things worth doing in the world had been declared impossible before they were done." -- Louis D. Brandeis
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 Posted 11/27/2020  01:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Princetane to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Paralyse, your Threepence can meet its big brother




Great Britain - 1709 Halfcrown Queen Anne - VG+ with a circulation cameo.

Been a 37 year gap since my last coin, but only 12 years to the next one.

About Big Hair, Anne's bun is probably amongst the most restrained hairdos of the era and she was a woman (A very butch one apparently later on..)
Loving Halfcrowns. British and Commonwealth coins 1750 - 1950 and anything Kiwi.
If it's round, shiny and silvery I will love it.
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