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My US Bank Note Type Set

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 Posted 09/18/2020  11:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
This note was never on my list... When the local coin shop got it in, they let me know and offered it to me at a great price... This is the 1899 $2 silver certificate.This is F258 with the Speelman and White signature.
Well done!
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 Posted 09/19/2020  5:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Like I posted many times before, I really like packages with stamps....
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 Posted 09/19/2020  5:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So what was in the package?

Well I usually start with an inexpensive purchase, but I really really wanted this note. My first large note Gold Certificate. This is my most expensive note so far. This is F1173 which is the 1922 series of the Gold Certificates. This series didn't last long as they went to the small sized notes after this. I love how the back of these is a golden orange. The bust is of Michael Hillegas who was the treasure of the US from 1775 to 1789. Mr Hillegas was born April 22, 1729 and died September 29, 1804, he was the first treasurer of the United States. Mr Hillegas was an editor of the Declaration of Independence. As the Treasure of the Continental Congress he used much of his own money for the revolution. On September 11, 1789, Congress created the Treasury Department, and Alexander Hamilton took the oath of office as the first Secretary of the Treasury. On that same date, Hillegas tendered his resignation, and Samuel Meredith was appointed Treasurer. He was born and died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


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United States
199 Posts
 Posted 09/20/2020  09:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add captaincoffee to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1899 $2 Silver Certificate is the one that ultimately broke my "I won't spend over X on a note" rule (the first time). On the large size notes, there are only so many you can collect before you need to either reassess the limit or have to stop. Then only a few more before you have to reassess again.
I do love the orange/gold color of the gold certificates and how they stand out next to other banknotes in my album. Also another series that I very quickly thought, well, I'll never be able to afford any of the rest of these!
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 Posted 09/20/2020  10:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice-looking example, Helder!
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 Posted 09/20/2020  1:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SteveInTampa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Congratulations on your new addition. I've found that the color intensity of these notes, especially when posted on the internet, depends on the condition of the note and the type of scanner and editing software. I have one example in my collection in a VF-25 holder. I bought it in person, raw from my LCS many years ago.


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 Posted 09/20/2020  4:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Steve,

All my images are with a full frame DSLR (Canon 6D) and a 100MM F2.8 Macro lens at ISO 100. I shoot in manual (from 1/2 to 1 second). I only crop and sometimes brighten the image. Remember all mine are in a top loader that has a slight blue tint, hence the notes are always slightly bluer than they should be. I don't use a scanner for any pictures I posted.

You're $10 GC is very nice, looks like mine.
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 Posted 09/20/2020  4:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The 1899 $2 Silver Certificate is the one that ultimately broke my "I won't spend over X on a note" rule (the first time). On the large size notes, there are only so many you can collect before you need to either reassess the limit or have to stop. Then only a few more before you have to reassess again.


El Capitan del Cafe

My limit is $300 and I plan on sticking to it. I only purchased 3 coins that were more than $300 (the 1909 S VDB, 1916D and 1877 and these were planned). With notes I used the price guide and that's why the 1899 $2 was not on the list, so getting it at the price I did made me get it. I have one more expensive than the $10 GC on hold and then the others are less.

I was checking out the Fractionals and currently 2 are close to my limit in a nice grade (the 3rd issue Liberty and 4th issue Lincoln), but they aren't over it.

As far as going over in that $300 limit I doubt it, before I'll go over, I still have a few on my list that are under that limit
Edited by hfjacinto
09/20/2020 4:44 pm
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 Posted 09/20/2020  4:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My next note. As El Capitan de Cafe informed me, I had no $2 star note, so I had to rectify that.

Some interesting facts about the $2 note.

First authorized in 1862, $2 bills were printed until 1966, at which point they were discontinued.but only for 10 years. They were reintroduced in 1976 as part of the Bicentennial celebration.
Many collectors had their Bicentennial bills postmarked on the day of issue (April 13, 1976), hoping to turn them into valuable collectibles. There are now so many of the postmarked bills that they may never be worth more than $2.
The 1976 reintroduction was an attempt at cost-cutting. The government estimated that it could save $26 million if the $2 bill replaced about half of the $1 bills in circulation. (It didn't.)
Because of a persistent myth that $2 bills are no longer in production, some people hoard them. According to the U.S. Treasury, there are about 500 million $2 bills in circulation.
In 1925, the U.S. government tried to promote the use of $2 bills by putting one in all federal-employee pay envelopes.
Who's on the $2 bill? It's been Thomas Jefferson since 1869. But when the bill was introduced in 1862, it featured Alexander Hamilton's portrait.
When you pay for something with a $2 bill, where does the cashier put it? Under the cash drawer. Reason: There's no standard slot for $2 bills.
Merchants sometimes refuse to accept $2 bills, and that's perfectly legal. They could turn down $20s, too. In fact, if they prefer credit card or electronic payment, they aren't legally required to accept cash at all, regardless of denomination.
Less than one percent of U.S. currency produced is $2 bills.

And lastly, its really my Favorite small sized bill.


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 Posted 09/20/2020  4:53 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SteveInTampa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Same note with enhancements to sell on eBay...

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 Posted 09/20/2020  5:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice star deuce!
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 Posted 09/21/2020  10:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
From $2 in 2003 we go to $2 in 2003a. 2003 $2 bills were signed by Rosario Marin and John W. Snow. 2003a notes were signed by Anna Escobedo Cabral and John W. Snow. Besides the A and the signature difference, they are the exact same note. But I didn't have a 2003 A note hence....


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 Posted 09/21/2020  10:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
And since I like $2 bills, a sample of each year (I know I forgot 2003, I'll eventually take this picture again...)



Edited by hfjacinto
09/21/2020 10:41 am
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91042 Posts
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 Posted 09/21/2020  7:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add southsav to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Those are sweet $2 bills.
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