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Recent Pick Up...elagabalus Denarius

 
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Spain
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 Posted 05/22/2020  02:26 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Been looking for an Elagabalus Denarius for a while...Picked this one up with a nice portrait and I particularly liked the reverse portrayal of Providentia...

As this is a family forum I'm not going to go into the supposed debauched lifestyle of this Emperor you can read all about it here..https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elagabalus

Something I didn't know about this Emperor was that his mother Julia Soaemias publicly declared him the illegitimate son of Caracalla and when appointed emperor at the age of 14 took the name Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus after his alleged father, and although most people know him as Elagabalus was only called this after his death.

He became Emperor in June 218AD after the defeat of Macrinus at the battle of Antioch but didn't arrive in Rome until late 219AD...This coin was probably minted before he had been seen in person...It must have been a strange senario on his arrival to Rome the 'first Oriental Priest as Emperor'...
Elagabalus. 218-222 AD. AR Denarius (3.22 gm, 19mm). Rome mint. Struck 219 AD.
Obv.: laureate and draped bust right.
Rev.: Providentia standing left with legs crossed, leaning on column to right, holding rod over globe in right hand and cornucopia in left.
RIC IV 23; RSC 144.
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United Kingdom
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 Posted 05/22/2020  03:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add maridvnvm to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin. A very nice one for the type.

How do you account for his coins where the reverse legend reads "SACRED DEI SOLIS ELAGAB"?

Regards,
Martin
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Spain
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 Posted 05/22/2020  05:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Martin....It's nicer in hand but my photography skills are poor...

Quote:
How do you account for his coins where the reverse legend reads "SACRED DEI SOLIS ELAGAB"?
..
Do you mean why is his name on the coin?...The translation I get is 'To the holy sun god Elagabal'. Do you think this is referring to the god or the man himself? Or maybe it's both?...His taken name ANTONINVS is portrayed on the obverse so I'm assuming it's naming the god on the reverse?....I'm very interested in your thoughts...Paul

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 Posted 05/22/2020  07:00 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice coin Paul.
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Australia
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 Posted 05/22/2020  07:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Quote from A Dictionary of Roman Coins, (p. 356, publ. 1889), by Seth W Stevenson:-

"The next day, as Elagabalus had given orders to arrest those who had taken part in the insurrectionary movement of the day before - the rest of the soldiers took advantage of that occasion to get of a prince they detested; they killed Elagabalus, together with his mother Soemius, and his principal confidants. His body after being dragged through the streets the city, was thrown into the Tibur.
Thus perished on the 11th of March, one of the most cruel, debauched, and shameless wretches, that ever disgraced humanity or polluted a throne, after a reign of three years and nine months, disfigured with every feature of hideous criminality and extravagant folly, not having attained more than the eighteenth year of his age."

Apparently, Victorian antiquarians didn't like him very much!

Denarii, and to a lesser extent the antoninianii, of Elagabalus can be found reasonably easily in VF or better. I guess that he needed lots of money to keep the troops quiet. My guess is that some the troops that didn't get a handout finally did him in.
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 Posted 05/22/2020  07:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great coin, Paul.


Quote:
As this is a family forum...


Well, then, good thing you didn't post one of those Elagabalus issues with a, um, "horn" projecting from his laurel wreath.
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 Posted 05/22/2020  11:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice coin of Rome's strangest emperor.

In truth, I have always felt a bit of sympathy for Elagabalus. Yes, I know that his character is somewhat to blame, but here's a teenaged boy who started life basically as a sideshow for Roman centurions, suddenly placed in a position where he has access to limitless money and unchecked power. His father was long dead, his mother was almost equally debauched, and his grandmother didn't care as long as she got her power trip. I can tell you that if I was in that position at 14 years old, I wouldn't have been a stable leader, either.

Regarding his name, Elagabalus does indeed refer only to the sun God on his coins, and he was never called that during his lifetime. On an interesting aside, I once saw an auction house (forget which one) attribute his coins as "Antoninus Pius III". Certainly a novel approach, and not inaccurate, either.

The naming conventions of emperors by modern scholars is a bit silly if you think about it -
- Calling Gaius by his childhood nickname Caligula to distinguish him from Augustus' grandson
- Applying slanderous nicknames to Antoninus Pius II and III like Caracalla and Elagabalus
- Calling Julian "the second" to distinguish him from an ephemeral third century usurper
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