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Idenifying This Roman Bronze Proving Difficult

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 3 / Views: 151Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
United States
4168 Posts
 Posted 09/24/2020  5:01 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
This is what I get for bothering with such a rough specimen.

A bit in excess of 29 mm in diameter, with a weight of just over 13.5 grams.

My impression is that the portrait is of a Severan emperor, and I thought I might utilize the reverse's wreath motif to nail down which one, but I'm not seeing any match I can have confidence in.





Colligo ergo sum
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Australia
13451 Posts
 Posted 09/24/2020  9:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Well, for starters, it's a Roman provincial, not a Roman Imperial coin - the language on the obverse is Greek.

Provincial coins tend to be a bit more variable when it comes to portraiture.

Best match for the visible parts of the name I'm reading it as "...ANTWNINOC DIADOVM..." so, that would be Diadumenian? The portrait doesn't look child-like enough for Diadumenian's portrait, but as I said, the Provincials often didn't have an official portrait to work from, so they just guessed.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
United States
5272 Posts
 Posted 09/24/2020  9:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like might be ANTΩNINOC in the obverse legend, and I can believe that 1:00 - 3:00 might be ΔIAΔOV of ΔIAΔOVMENIANOC, as on some AE's of Diadumenian from Anazarbus, Cilicia. For a comparison to some obverses from Anazarbus, although with different reverses than yours, here's an AE29 at left, AE 31 to the right. OP at top.



Another, AE30:



The above coins have reverses different than the OP coin. However, here's a reverse, perhaps similar to the OP's, from another Anazarbus issue (once again, it's a Diadumenian). But the obverse legend is different on this one:



No definitive match for the obverse/reverse combo, above. But perhaps a point in the right direction?
Pillar of the Community
United States
4168 Posts
 Posted 09/24/2020  10:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow, you guys are good!

Diadumenian wasn't yet 10 years old at the time of his death, and had been co-emperor with his father for, like, a month (although Caesar for over a year). I was surprised overall by how many provincial issues bearing his name were struck.


Colligo ergo sum
Edited by Lucky Cuss
09/24/2020 10:05 pm
  Previous TopicReplies: 3 / Views: 151Next Topic  
 
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