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Mexico 8 Reales Of 1816, But Made Of Copper-What Is The Story?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 3 / Views: 303Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
Canada
3836 Posts
 Posted 10/24/2020  3:02 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Message




This weighs 26,8 grams and has a diameter of about 38 millimeters. The edge looks "spooned"- An analysis seemed to show 97.6 % copper with small % of Zinc, Tin, lead and Iron. It appears to be machine struck and heavily worn.

I would be quite interested to know if there is a story behind this-was this a fake that never got silvered? Why would it circulate then? Or something else?

I am hoping that our 8 reales expert-or anyone else-has some insight
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United States
1695 Posts
 Posted 10/24/2020  7:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jfransch to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
appears to be a beautiful contemporary circulating counterfeit, probably originally silver washed. Fantastic find.
"Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself."
-Mark Twain
Pillar of the Community
United States
5045 Posts
 Posted 10/27/2020  12:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add swamperbob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
oriole You have an example of a Contemporary Circulating Counterfeit that is shown in my book; under GNL# 1816-Obv: A / Rev: Mo JJ-002. It is a struck counterfeit made using two different alloys - Copper as yours and a white metal with a silver wash. The copper example like yours has virtually no remaining silvering.

Why some of the CCC types have no remaining silvering is essentially impossible to answer. I believe it is a function of the original coloring wearing away or evaporating over time.

In the late 1990s a forger operating in Mass passed struck copper 25 cent pieces that were "silvered" using mercury. That coasting could evaporate or rub off entirely under the correct conditions.

Other surface washes may have been equally temporary as mercury.

Your coin shows edge damage but is otherwise in very good condition. Neither of the coins I already have pictures of have any more "detail" than yours. The dies may have been made to produce well worn looking coins.
My book on Counterfeit Portrait 8Rs is available from Amazon http://ccfgo.com/TheUnrealReales or from me directly if you want it signed.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
3836 Posts
 Posted 10/27/2020  12:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, @Swamperbob! That explanation clears up my questions.
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