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Are World Coins On Ebay Overvalued?

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Valued Member
United States
369 Posts
 Posted 04/19/2021  08:12 am  Show Profile   Check beem's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add beem to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There are some great replies in this thread.

I would say the world coin market has been growing for at least 10 years, not just since the pandemic. There are many reasons, but mainly because the world has been brought closer together ever since the birth of and growth of the internet. Before so, most people collected coins only from their own country, which is why US and British coins were, and still are, valued so high. With so much cash crowded into these coins, prices of other coins from other countries were valued too low. What we are seeing is a correction of that error within the market.

That's the bigger picture. The smaller picture, what we've been seeing for the past year, is the result of central bank and gov't stimulus spending which has caused many things, but most relevant here, big bubbles in all the collectibles markets. Comic books, sports cards, wrestling cards, probably art, and coins, all sucking up tons of cash from speculators. The good news is, very little of this stimulus money is going into coins compared to the other markets. If you think world coin prices have exploded, look at the comic and collectible card markets. The difference is night and day. At a Heritage Auction late last year, a 1997 Michael Jordan basketball card fetched over a million USD.

That said, the coin market has not been immune, there are segments of the coin market which are very bubbly. Modern forced rarities, colorized, odd shaped, "high-tech" coins, movie themed (Star Wars, James Bond, Simpson), slabbed bullion - people spending $1000+ for an MS70 coin when it can be found at MS69 for $40. I'm sure there are others.

Very little of the "new money" is chasing old, high grade, truly rare coins. There's some, sure, and it's why you're seeing higher prices. But if I may make an observation, which hopefully will not offend anyone here, and it shouldn't, there is at least one thing buyers of these coins have in common, intelligence. Intelligence is not common. It's rare. And this is why a 1997 Michael Jordan basketball card can fetch $1 million while a 300 year old rare beautiful gold coin can be found for less than $10,000. It's why a 1999 US Silver Eagle slabbed MS70 will fetch more money than 1791 Netherlands Ducaton slabbed MS61.
Valued Member
United States
369 Posts
 Posted 04/19/2021  08:33 am  Show Profile   Check beem's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add beem to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One more observation on which I would like to comment, coins "over priced" on Ebay. I'm only going to comment on my own listings, some of which may be perceived as falling into this category. I have at least a handful of coins listed with prices that may seem high, and maybe I'm a "dreamer" but my price is high because I think the market's valuation is too low. And if my price seems high to someone, they can feel free to find the coin elsewhere. I had someone send me a message on Ebay recently regarding MS graded Swiss Thalers, suggesting my prices were too high. Well, why was he messaging me? Because he couldn't find them anywhere else. If he could, and at the price he perceived as fair, he wouldn't be messaging me. Eventually, buyers like this break down and pay the higher price, simply because they fail to find it cheaper. And, well, this is how the market works, this is how prices go up. Supply and demand. I'm not a "dreamer," I just see where this market is headed, and I see the valuations of a lot of world coins headed higher, MUCH higher in some instances.
New Member
United States
17 Posts
 Posted 04/20/2021  12:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wizened to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
On ebay sometimes a coin goes for a surprisingly high price simply because it is rare and at least two bidders are seriously interested in it.

I have sold on ebay and concluded it is marginal for coins worth less than $10. Sure there are some sellers who have made a real business of it and can list 20+ coins in an hour, and for them it makes sense. But for a casual seller it is difficult to deal with low value coins.

The more common the coin, the more auction makes sense. even starting at .01. Say a common date Peace dollar. But for rare coins you cannot take that risk. You put it up on Buy it Now at the price you think right and be prepared for a long wait. After a time you should consider a reduced price.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1136 Posts
 Posted 04/20/2021  6:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NumisEd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I had someone send me a message on Ebay recently regarding MS graded Swiss Thalers, suggesting my prices were too high. Well, why was he messaging me? Because he couldn't find them anywhere else. If he could, and at the price he perceived as fair, he wouldn't be messaging me. Eventually, buyers like this break down and pay the higher price, simply because they fail to find it cheaper.


I was in a somewhat similar situation last year with a Willem II AU58 Gulden I wanted for my collection. I didn't find anything anywhere except for this sole eBay seller who wanted a steep price for it.
I decided to place the coin on my Watchlist and waited, waited, waited...
Finally, the seller send me a 6% off offer (there was no submit an offer option on the sale page) which I accepted.
Before accepting, I did do my homework to see what comparable coins would sell for at dealers in The Netherlands. Yes, I could have bought a similar coin from them and have it ship to the US, but then the shipping costs would have been atrocious. Thus, no easy solution.
In the end I think I paid a fair price, rather than waiting "forever" for a better price.
New Member
Australia
42 Posts
 Posted 04/20/2021  8:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add drowning to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've come across more issues with "over grading" than over pricing. When you have such huge leaps in value between grades (eg. VF at 1.50 compared with XF at 80.00) it is not unusual to see a coin listed as $75-85, when really it should be $1-2.

Obviously sometimes this is deliberate, but there are other times when I think the seller just doesn't have the experience to properly grade those coins.
Valued Member
Russian Federation
238 Posts
 Posted 04/21/2021  05:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Slerk to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I recently put two coins on eBay: an 1878 Farthing and an 1888 UK Farthing. I did some research and put them up for $ 45 and $ 30, respectively, but I don't know if that's a fair price. After all, the price of a coin depends heavily on its condition, but since I am not an expert in valuation, I can not say exactly how much they will cost. So maybe for some buyers my prices will be high.
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1742 Posts
 Posted 04/23/2021  5:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think it depends. Certainly I find that decent 20th century stuff is better priced that Australian coin when I buy on Australian ebay.
Pillar of the Community
Australia
644 Posts
 Posted 04/28/2021  9:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add David Graham to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For modern limited edition coins it also pays (no pun intended) to always keep browsing EBay listings and avoid big sellers. You can often look at the sold listings for a particular coin that might be averaging $20-30 and spot an instance where someone scored the coin for $5-10. Invariably these are from sellers who don't specialise in coins and often have few items for sale. I suspect, unless a person is putting that coins details in their search engine, they won't see that listing. High volume coin sellers will attract punters who are looking for other coins but browse the sellers other items and decide to place bids on it, even though they weren't searching for that coin to start with. More bidders will drive up the price.
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