Coin Community Family of Web Sites
YourCoinBox is offering a stress free way to appraise and sell your coins from the comfort of your home. Our goal is to create an ultra transparent and no pressure experience for finding out what your coins are worth and what to do with them.
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Severely Rusted Die On 2000-P Virginia Quarter

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 14 / Views: 439Next Topic  
New Member
United States
19 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  03:08 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add MadDawgMaverick to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Long time no post, figured id kick things back off with this quarter. I'm taking an educated guess its simply a die with some significant pitting from rust, as I have yet to see a 21st century coin this bad. Pulled from a OBW box of quarters I've had since '02. Will likely update with better photos at higher magnifications tomorrow - for those of you interested.









Pillar of the Community
United States
4077 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  04:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jimbucks to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Has nothing to do with the die, the coin has just been beat up.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
40136 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  04:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm seeing MD on USofA,and something is going on with a bunch of the letters and inside rim?
John1
( I'm no pro, it's just my humble opinion )
Searched 6.5 +/- Million Cents Since 1971
Valued Member
Learn More...
United States
282 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  08:30 am  Show Profile   Check VestigeWolf's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add VestigeWolf to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I see a whole bunch of die chips. Doesn't that come from a worn/damaged die? Plus MD. What does the back look like?
Discovering the truth does not have all the answers.
Edited by VestigeWolf
05/30/2021 08:32 am
Bedrock of the Community
United States
40136 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  08:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like it is called DDD. On Canadian coins it is referred to as mortar set https://www.coinsandcanada.com/coin...tar-set&id=9
John1
( I'm no pro, it's just my humble opinion )
Searched 6.5 +/- Million Cents Since 1971
Pillar of the Community
United States
2040 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  09:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SamCoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I see common Die Deterioration Doubling and what looks like a coin with lots of little nicks and dings from years in circulation. Not any kind of mint error or exotic die event.
My best finds:
1996 DDO-001/FS-101: http://goccf.com/t/372066
1995 DDO-001/FS-101: http://goccf.com/t/376071#3225244
2000-D Maryland Quarter Rotated Die http://goccf.com/t/394553
1988-P "Reverse of '89": http://goccf.com/t/399390
Massive strike through error on 1957-P Jefferson nickel http://goccf.com/t/402781
Edited by SamCoin
05/30/2021 09:01 am
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
52422 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  09:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, it gets much worse as the die continues to age:




Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
59470 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  09:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Basically just circulation damage.



to the CCF!
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
18740 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  09:58 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If a die is is pitted with rust, those pits would show up in relief (raised) on the coin.
For a die to be rusted, it would have to sit idle for a very long time in most cases for years, to allow the rust to develop.

It is highly improbable that a coin would be struck from a die, with date date years earlier earlier than the actual strike date. A Mint would have to have a good reason for deliberately doing so, and then only non rusted dies would be used.

Most modern coinage dies are good for around 200 thousand strikes. As such, typical die life is usually less than one week. Thus, it would be highly improbable to find a modern coin struck from rusted dies.

Die chips and grease and debris strike throughs could be confused with a highlky improbable rusted die coin.
Pillar of the Community
United States
7286 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  10:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

The slabbed Half dollar No FG farce: Download No-FG half vs. Grading Company Claims report here:
https://tinyurl.com/yalrstjz or higher resolution version: https://tinyurl.com/y7rksxu8

- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
52422 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  10:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
But if the raised rust is on a die, it could leave incuse marks on the coin. Usually the only time you would see rust on a die would be on the 18th and 19th century coins were the die was re-used on a few years later, like on over date dies.

But the mint doesn't re-use dies any longer. When they are retired, the are most of the time defaced and either sold or recycled.


So today they don't stay around enough to rust at the mint.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
05/30/2021 10:09 am
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
18740 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  11:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I would think that rust on the die, being relatively fragile against the hardened metal of the die, would be crushed as it forms, and would be cleared from the die with repeated striking.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1581 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  11:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jmkendall to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm thinking some people are not reading your post before replying.

You said you got this from an OBW? Did you mean an OBW of Virginia coins? Or just and obw roll of random coins? I'm assuming you mean the former, as why would you post the later?

If an obw of Virgina coins then circulation damage is dismissed.

I do see an abnormal amount of what I call die chips, that together with letter would suggest a "terminal" state die. I've never seen one this bad.

I don't think it is rust, but I would like to address that issue. As an Engineer I have worked in production facilities and am familiar with both official practices and unofficial practices.

I understand that the mint's practice is to not reused dies. However; I am fairly confident they don't have a person who goes around and destroys the dies the very second they come off the press. I would suspect they are collected at a central point until their are enough to justify the manhours needed to destroy them.

In that interval I can see a possible, but highly unlikely, scenario where the supply of dies does not keep up with the usage and rather than not meet a production goal, an old die is reused. I do not think that is completely impossible. I could be wrong but I think my scenario has a fair chance of actually happening in the real world. As to rust, I find that much more difficult to sustain as I would think that the interval between retirment and defacement would be relatively short. Though without knowing where they were stored, and if there was even the slightest chance that they were stored around corrosive chemicals, I can not say with absolute confidence that a damaged die was not reused. Though I agree it would be a low order probability

Strange things happen in the real world.
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
52422 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2021  5:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you are referring to the lines like on 'OF AME', those are die flow lines from an aging die. We need more clues as to what you are seeing. Arrows are great. Otherwise I have to guess what your are seeing? I'm commenting on what I'm seeing on your coin.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
18740 Posts
 Posted 05/31/2021  09:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The practice of the Royal Australian Mint is to report total number of coins struck of each date and denomination in a production year.
Sometimes, dies are retained in production in carry over into the next production year, until the die is worn out.
When worn out, it is retained in security until such time it is convenient to the Mint for the worn out die to be destroyed. They are never re used, and so there is NO chance for rust to develop and the die to return to production at a much later date.

I would think that most, if not all Mints around the World, would follow a similar practice.
  Previous TopicReplies: 14 / Views: 439Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.44 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05