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What Is The Best Way To Invest In Bullion?

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Pillar of the Community
United States
2285 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2022  8:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NumisEd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
With the current sky high premium for junk silver and ASEs, what are your favorite buys now?
Pillar of the Community
United States
4256 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2022  05:58 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fistfulladirt to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
With the current sky high premium for junk silver and ASEs, what are your favorite buys now?
I haven't bought an ounce of silver since exactly two years ago when spot hit $12. Following silver today, I disregard the spot price as meaningless. The 'premium' is the actual price of physical silver in retail, and that's going to vary, IMO. I really like pre-33 gold but it's sure pricey. Fond of $10 Indian but it's almost doubled in price since I last bought one.

Afa selling precious? I wouldn't have to even leave the house. Good prices being paid by major online vendors.
When I listen to LED ZEPPELIN...so do my neighbors...
Roll hunting since '77
Dirt fishing since '72
Valued Member
United States
454 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2022  7:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jaxenro to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
"Spot x .715 = melt value for 90%"
"Do not buy junk silver as close to spot as you can. Buy it as close to melt as you can. Today,20% over melt is still less than spot."

Spot and melt are the same thing. The full calculation is "face x .715 x spot", or in other words (at this minutes spot)

$10.00 x .715 x $25.52 = $182.47

you can't calculate melt value without the spot price so pretending melt and spot are different is meaningless. Melt is simply a way to calculate the silver content weight of the face value of coins.

another way to do it would be .715 x $25.52 = $18.25 (.715 x spot) and then multiply that by face

I challenge anyone to tell me the melt value of a roll of dimes without referring to spot in the calculation. And spot is the only changing variable the .715 and the face value of a specific coin does not change. A dime is a dime today and a week from now and a month from now and it will always take ten of them to make a dollar. If it's value changes it is because the spot price of silver changed

the value of silver is weight x spot, whether that weight is based on .715 of face or 1 oz round or 1000 ounce bar. the key is to get as close to that value by minimizing the premium and at the same time dealing in something others recognize as having value.

A generic round and a ASE may have the same silver value but the ASE has a higher premium both buying and selling. what we see in the smaller market (i.e. stackers typically buying 500 ounces of phyiscal or less) is the premium climbs not only as the spot changes but as physical becomes scarcer. I think we might be heading int a situation like that as people look to shelter money from inflation
Edited by jaxenro
03/21/2022 8:01 pm
New Member
United States
39 Posts
 Posted 06/03/2022  4:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wizened to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It depends on your purpose, your worry.

You can buy SIVR, a silver ETF, or GLD, a gold ETF, on the stock market. .30% annual fees on SIVR. Supposing you held it for 10 years and silver went up 3% in that time, you could cash out at even. No one buys to break even in dollars, though. Maybe break even in real purchasing power, especially as an inflation hedge. On that level, 3% cost to hold for 10 years is pretty good. No spread to cover. No risk of theft other than the risk of government theft, like Roosevelt did with gold. You would be a sitting target there holding SIVR.

Another reason to hold silver or gold (or cigarettes or bullets) is to be holding something in case of an apocalypse or hyperinflation. 90% silver half dollars might be the best thing to be holding then.
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