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1988 Quarter Missing Nickel Clad Layer. Need Help With Grading N Value

 
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 Posted 07/30/2021  11:01 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add S3anJ0hn to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
At 1st inlooked at this and thought, just a dirty old quarter... But luckily because if this community I remembwred reading about a copper quarter somewhwre and thought, could it be?... Well after a lil research and a little water and finger rubbing I'm convinces that its indeed a missing clad issue and a pretty good one at that.any professional insight and info will be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Wish I had better picture quality options but hopefully this will show enough to jusge.

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 Posted 07/30/2021  11:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add DBM to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How much does it weigh?
"Dipping" is not considered cleaning...
-from PCGS website
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 Posted 07/30/2021  11:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add S3anJ0hn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
5.30 grams
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 Posted 07/30/2021  11:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add S3anJ0hn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply




I also came across this 1974 no mint mark quarter with nickel clad issues also today...weight 5.44 grams
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 Posted 07/31/2021  12:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Numiscrat to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Best to stick with one coin at a time.

The first coin looks corroded to me. A nontechnical term you may see used on here is "staining". What I suspect in cases like yours is a type of corrosion called dealloying. Remember that the clad layer is mostly copper—not clad—to begin with. 75%/25% Cu/Ni, to be more specific. Corrosive environments which remove nickel and/or replate copper back onto the surface could make it look copper colored. In industrial environments, that type of dealloying is called denickelification. I doubt that it has been studied on coins. Not enough money involved.


(Yes. That pun was intentional, but likely true. )



Signs that this might be the case:

1. Copper color doesn't seem dark enough to be just core layer. Core is pretty much pure copper.

2. Rough, pitted appearance of surfaces = corrosion

3. Weight is only a little under spec, so wear and corrosion seem to explain it, although I have seen a Mike Diamond article that says a clad layer can be missing without a noticeable low weight, but that type of missing clad error is really rare. Otherwise, two clad layers missing would be much lower.

4. Unless it is just glare, there seems to be some paler spots on the high points which indicates the dealloyed layer has been worn through into the undisturbed cupronickel cladding.

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 Posted 07/31/2021  03:53 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Rough, pitted appearance of surfaces = corrosion


Looks like a beach coin or a metal detector find to me. I've dug up a Roosevelt dime (on an English village green!) that was almost identical in appearance.
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 Posted 07/31/2021  05:25 am  Show Profile   Check Yokozuna's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Yokozuna to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
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I don't think that these are missing clad error coins. They look like they are showing environmental damage and discoloration. As noted above, these may have been buried at some time.

When a planchet loses a clad layer before the strike, it results in the loss of detail on both sides of the coin. If it lost both clad layers, the resulting strike would show heavy loss of detail.

While it is possible to have a coin with both clad layers missing, or simply rolled out of the copper intended for the core, they are almost impossibly rare and very few have been certified.
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 Posted 07/31/2021  09:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Second one looks like a dug coin. Guessing both just suffering from environmental discoloring rather than missing cladding.



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 Posted 07/31/2021  12:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Oldfordman to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Both just discolored.
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