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Canadian Dime Rim Reeding Damage Or Error?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 14 / Views: 459Next Topic  
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 Posted 08/01/2021  08:58 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Was looking at the reeding on this dine and noticed a line going through the reeding all the way around the coin. I don't look at the edge of coins often and can't find anything on this. I wanna assume it's from some kind of holder or something squeezing the rim all the way around.
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Canada
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 Posted 08/01/2021  09:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Whatever caused it, it is damage and not an error.
Reeding is put on when the planchet goes through the upsetting mill
and I can't can't see how that line could occur at that time.
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Canada
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 Posted 08/01/2021  09:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
All the errors I have seen that have an indent through the reeding is caused by other errors and is usually much more dramatic then this, so I think I'll have to agree. Just looked so precise prefect line going all the way around through the middle of the reeding so I had to ask. Thanks again @JimmyD for taking time to answer :).
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 Posted 08/01/2021  09:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think JimmyD calls it.
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 Posted 08/01/2021  10:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Hounddog Bill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Quote: "Reeding is put on when the planchet goes through the upsetting mill.

JimmyD, are you sure about this statement?

Cheers, Bill
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 Posted 08/01/2021  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add john100 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The collar creates the reeding, agree this id PMD
Edited by john100
08/01/2021 10:11 am
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 Posted 08/01/2021  10:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Of course reeding occurs from the collar.
Must have been asleep this morning.
At least Coinfrog agreed with me.
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 Posted 08/01/2021  11:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Oldfordman to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Damage.
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Canada
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 Posted 08/03/2021  3:54 pm  Show Profile   Check SPP-Ottawa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SPP-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Reeding is put on when the planchet goes through the upsetting mill


For the benefit of Wreckkdd, the upset mill turns blanks (Type 1) into planchets (Type 2).

The collar die puts on the reeding, it also puts the 11-sided shape on the loon dollar and the intermittent reeding on the two dollar coin. The collar die is essential to form a proper rim on the coin as well, as it constrains the flow of metal. Any excess metal can force its way out of the collar, resulting in a rim fin.

Lastly, previous interpretations are correct; that is a damaged coin.
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 Posted 08/03/2021  4:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@Spp-Ottowa thanks for the info:), how do you differentiate a rim fin from a slightly misaligned die? Or is it the same thing?
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 Posted 08/03/2021  4:36 pm  Show Profile   Check SPP-Ottawa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SPP-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A mis-aligned die is a process, which can affect many coins all the same.

A rim fin is a result, which can happen through any number (or combination) of processes.

For example, here is a rim fin that was caused from too much pressure on a proof strike:


Here is a rim fin from two planchets being struck together (lots of excess metal):


And, of course, a rim fin with a misaligned die.


"Discovery follows discovery, each both raising and answering questions, each ending a long search, and each providing the new instruments for a new search." -- J. Robert Oppenheimer

Content of this post is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses...0/deed.en_US

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Canada
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 Posted 08/03/2021  4:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coinman91 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great Examples SPP!
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 Posted 08/03/2021  5:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@SppOttowa, so the silver dime I posted is a misaligned die but not enough to be called a rim fin?
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 Posted 08/03/2021  9:38 pm  Show Profile   Check SPP-Ottawa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SPP-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Don't forget that coins are mint as a mechanical production stream. I would argue that the dies are never -perfectly- aligned, and there is a degree of tolerance that the mint deems acceptable. Your silver coin, with a slightly misaligned hammer (reverse) die, falls within that range of tolerance. So yes, the rim is weakly finned in your 1965 10c that you posted. Is it weak enough to be of any desire to an error collector? Absolutely not. However, if you like it, then collect it - just don't expect its value to ever exceed the value of the silver in that coin.
"Discovery follows discovery, each both raising and answering questions, each ending a long search, and each providing the new instruments for a new search." -- J. Robert Oppenheimer

Content of this post is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses...0/deed.en_US

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 Posted 08/04/2021  07:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wrekkdd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Decided to tip it to a young delivery man who brought my pizza yesterday, asked if he wanted 5$ or 2 silver dimes, he chose dimes so I gave him the 1965 and a 1967 fish dime. I have off stucks for educational reasons and to compare tolerance.
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