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Post Your Coins And Medals With A Public Service Career Theme

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 Posted 09/14/2021  5:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Although this coin doesn't actually have a portrait on it, I think it fits this theme

I believe it works! Thanks for adding!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 09/15/2021  09:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
John Marshall began his public service career in 1775 when he voluntarily enlisted in the Virginia state militia - the Culpeper Minute Men - his father was also a member. After the Minute Men were disbanded in January 1776, Marshall continued the fight against the British as a member of the 3rd Regiment of Virginia within the Continental Army.

Marshall became a 1st Lieutenant in the 3rd Virginia on July, 30 1776. He received a promotion to Captain-Lieutenant on July 31, 1776 and was reassigned to the 15th Virginia in December of the same year. On July 1, 1778 we was promoted to Captain and on September 14, 1778 was transferred to the 7th Virginia.

He saw action in multiple battles while serving (including Brandywine in September 1777 [a British victory] and Monmouth in June 1778 [neither side clearly victorious]), Between the two battles, during the winter of 1777-78, Marshall was at the infamous Valley Forge encampment, suffering alongside others of the Continental Army. He was officially discharged from the Army in 1781 (though his active participation essentially ended in 1779). During his time in the Army, Marshall became friends with George Washington.

He attended a series of law lectures at the College of William and Mary in 1780, and received a license to practice law the same year (August 1780).

In 1782 (and again in 1787 and 1795), Marshall was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates. He also continued to practice law and enjoyed increasing influence in Virginia's political circles. Marshall began his service at the national level in 1797, when he was appointed by President John Adams to be a member of a three-man team for a diplomatic mission to France - the mission sought, among other things, to negotiate the cessation of France's attacks on American ships at a time when America maintained its neutrality during France's Revolutionary Wars. The effort proved fruitless, however, due to the French officials seeking large financial bribes to even enter into negotiations and the American diplomats refusing to pay.

Marshall was elected to the US House of Representatives in 1799, but only served from March 5, 1799 through June 6, 1800 as US President John Adams tapped him to be his Secretary of State. It was another short-lived assignment - he served from June 13, 1800 to March 4, 1801 - as Adams nominated him for the position of Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court; he was confirmed on January 27, 1801 and began his term on February 4, 1801 (note the one-month overlap during which Marshall continued as Secretary of State though he had started his position as Chief Justice). Marshall went on to serve 34 years as Chief Justice, serving until his death on July 6, 1835.

Though he served in various public service roles prior, Marshall is most remembered for his decades of public service as the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court. To this day, he remains the longest-serving Chief Justice and was a key figure in strengthening the standing of the Court and in shaping how the Court viewed the US Constitution; he also drove the Court's move to the issuing of a single majority opinion on the matters it considered.

His life in service was commemorated in 2005 with a US silver dollar. John Mercanti was the designer of the obverse of the coin; he based his design the on a painting done by Charles-Balthazar-Julien Fevret de Saint-Memin in 1808. The reverse of the coin, by Donna Weaver, presents a view of the Old Supreme Court Chamber in the US Capitol Building.

2005 John Marshall 250th Anniversary of Birth Silver Dollar



For a look at the Chief Justice John Marshall Coins and Chronicles Set, including an image of the Charles-Balthazar-Julien Fevret de Saint-Memin painting, check out:

- Chief Justice John Marshall Coins and Chronicles Set


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 Posted 09/20/2021  08:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Next up is a coin issued to mark the 100th anniversary of a state joining the Union. Its obverse honors the state's favorite son - a man who literally gave all he could in service to the public - the 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial half dollar featuring Abraham Lincoln.

While the primary intent of this coin was to recognize the 100th anniversary of Illinois Statehood, the selection of the state's leading public servant as a dominant obverse design element can't be minimized - "The Land of Lincoln" chose to prominently honor its favorite son.

Abraham Lincoln lived in Illinois from 1830 until his departure for Washington, DC as the US President-elect in 1861. He moved with his family from Indiana to Illinois in 1830 and led a life that included public and private periods.

Lincoln began his life in public service in Illinois in April 1832 when he enlisted in the 31st Regiment of Illinois, a state militia group; he was elected as its Captain. His service in the militia was brief, however, as by August 1832 he was already out and running for a seat in the Illinois General Assembly. He did not win the election, but it was only a "first dip" into politics for Lincoln and a beginning not an end.

In 1834, he ran for the Illinois General Assembly again, and this time won a seat representing Sagamon County. He was re-elected in 1836, 1838 and 1840. After his fourth term, Lincoln settled into private life for a period. He married Mary Todd in 1842, and re-established his law practice. A few years later, in 1846, he was elected to the US House of Representatives from Illinois and served December 6, 1847 through March 4, 1849.

Between August, 1843 and April, 1853, Mary Todd and Abraham had four sons: Robert Todd, Edward Baker, William Wallace and Thomas. Only Robert Todd lived to adulthood (he died at the age of 82).

After serving one term in Congress, Lincoln returned to private life in Springfield, IL and practiced law. He was driven to return to politics in 1854 due to the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. The Act created the new territories of Kansas and Nebraska, but, more importantly, repealed the 1820 Missouri Compromise which had prohibited slavery in any and all new territories/states formed from the northern lands acquired as part of the Louisiana Purchase. This was an issue of great importance to Lincoln, and one that he could not watch silently from the sidelines and risk its impact expanding to other areas of the country. The Act was introduced in the US Senate by Stephen A. Douglas (D-IL) - yes, the Douglas of the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates.

After two unsuccessful runs at a Senate seat in the US Congress, in 1855 and 1858, the Republicans nominated Lincoln as their candidate for President in the 1860 election. He won the 1860 election and was inaugurated on March 4, 1861. South Carolina seceded from the Union before Lincoln was even inaugurated and Civil War hostilities broke out soon after with the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in South Carolina (on April 12, 1861). (There is a clear link between the US Civil War and the conflicting emotions over the Kansas-Nebraska Act.)

Lincoln won a second term in the 1864 election and was inaugurated on March 4, 1865. He was assassinated approximately six weeks later, being shot in the head by John Wilkes Booth while attending the play "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theater on April 14, 1865; Lincoln died the next morning.

There is no way I can do justice to Lincoln and his milestone-laden career here on CCF, I've tried to provide the briefest of overviews such that the reader could understand his commitment to serving the public. I recommend that those with an interest, seek out one of the many fine biographies on Lincoln, either on the internet or via a printed book, and learn much more about the man, his career and his many accomplishments that were for the benefit of his fellow man (e.g., the Emancipation Proclamation).

1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial Half Dollar




For some of my other posts about the Illinois coin, see:

- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial
- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Revisited
- Lincoln's Portrait on the Illinois Half Dollar
- Official Seals on Classic US Commemorative Coins
- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Coins that Depict the Sun Thread
- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Coins With Stars Thread
- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Coins Depicting Flora Thread
- 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Coins Depicting a Statue Thread


For more stories about other commemorative coins and medals, see: Read More: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
09/20/2021 10:32 am
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 Posted 09/20/2021  09:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A lovely coin and a very nice summary of his biography.
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 Posted 09/22/2021  3:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial half dollar was issued to commemorate the 1919 centennial of Alabama being admitted to the Union - two years late! (Links to the story are found below.)

The coin depicts William Wyatt Bibb (left, rear portrait), the last governor of the Territory of Alabama and, in 1819, the first governor of the State of Alabama, and Thomas Erby Kilby, the Alabama governor at the time of the centennial anniversary in 1919; Kilby was still Governor in 1921 when the coin was released. The left-facing, conjoined portraits are flanked by 22 stars (12 on the left, 10 on the right) that symbolically represent the fact that Alabama was the 22nd State.

The reverse design of the coin is adapted from the first Alabama State Seal (1868-1939), and features a left-facing bald eagle, perched on a US Shield, with its wings up and its talons clutching arrows. The eagle carries a ribbon in its beak that is inscribed with "HERE WE REST" (the first State Motto).

William Wyatt Bibb was born in Virginia on Octrober 2, 1781. He did not. however, start his political career in Virginia.

It was in Georgia that Bibb began his political (life in public service) career. Bibb was elected to the Georgia State Legislature in 1802 and served from 1803 to 1805; he was just 21 at the time he was elected. After his time in the State Legislature, he was elected to represent Georgia in the US House of Representatives via a special election in 1806 - he filled a Georgia vacancy created when Representative Thomas Spalding resigned. He began serving out Spalding's term in January 1807. Bibb was re-elected four times, thus serving in five consecutive Congresses (1805-1813; 9th through 13th), He resigned his House seat on November 6, 1813 as he had been elected to the US Senate. He served in the Senate from November 1813 to November 1816.

Bibb resigned from the US Senate in order to be appointed as the Governor of the Alabama Territory; he served in that position from March 6, 1817 through December 14, 1819. He took over as the State of Alabama Governor immediately following, and served until he died on July 10, 1820; he died from head and kidney injuries he had suffered previously after being thrown from his horse weeks before. All-in-all, Bibb served the public of Georgia and Alabama for nearly half of his life, approximately 18 of his 39 years.

As noted above, the coin's other portrait is that of the Alabama Governor at the time of the state's centennial in 1819 - Thomas Erby Kilby. He was was born in Tennessee on July 9, 1865, just weeks after the conclusion of the US Civil War. As a young man in his 20s, Kilby was already establishing himself as a successful businessman. He moved to Annison, Alabama for his position as agent for the Georgia-Pacific Railroad, and made Anniston his life-long home.

He entered public service as an elected member of the Anniston City Council in 1898. He followed his time on the Council by serving two consecutive terms as the Mayor of Anniston. After traveling to Europe to study the operations of local governments, he returned to Anniston and was elected as a State Senator in the Alabama Legislature; he served from 1911 to 1915.

He was elected as Alabama Lieutenant Governor in 1915. He successfully ran for Governor in 1918, and took office on January 20, 1919. He served until January 15, 1923. The Governor of Alabama was the last elected position that Kilby held; he did attempt to become a US Senator from Alabama, but was unsuccessful the two times he tried (the elections of 1926 and 1932).

He returned to private life and continued his involvement in the multiple companies he had established over his professional career. Kilby died in Anniston on October 22, 1943, having given 25 years of his life to serving the people of Alabama.

1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial Half Dollar, Plain Variety



For more information on the Alabama half dollar, check out:

- 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial, Plain Variety
- 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial, 2X2 Variety
- 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial - What if? Alabama Quarter
- 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial - Monroe-Wilson Design?
- 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial - Coins with Conjoined Portraits Thread
- Official Seals on Classic US Commemorative Coins - Part II


Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found at: Read More: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 09/23/2021  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1922 Ulysses S. Grant Centenary Memorial commemorative coins - a silver half dollar and a gold $1.00 were struck "in commemoration of the centenary of the birth of General Ulysses S. Grant, late President of the United States." (Public Law 67-137)

Grant was born on April 27, 1822 in Point Pleasant, Ohio and died from throat cancer on July 23, 1885; he was 63. In between, Grant served the public in multiple positions in and out of the military.

He attended the US Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated on June 30, 1843 with a rank of brevet Second Lieutenant (brevet indicated the rank was more administrative/honorary in nature vs. being the result of battlefield accomplishments). Grant began his active military career by being assigned to the US Army's 4th Infantry regiment. As part of the Regiment, he fought in the Mexican American War with his first engagement coming at the Battle of Palo Alto (near present-day Brownsville, Texas) on May 8, 1846. During the War, Grant received two citations for his bravery.

After various assignments/postings following the War, Grant resigned from the Army in 1854 and returned to Ohio where he eventually began working in his family's leather goods store in Galena, Illinois.

The US Civil War restarted Grant's military career. He first was assigned by Richard Yates, Sr., the Illinois Governor at the time, as a Lieutenant Colonel to oversee and provide disciplined structure to the 21st Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The US Army recognized his successful efforts and promoted him to Brigadier General. He led Union troops through a series of victories during the Civil War, including the capture of Tennessee's Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, and the defeat of Confederate forces at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

His siege of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Petersburg, Virginia in April 1865 led directly to Lee surrendering his troops at Appomattox on April 9, 1865; the surrender effectively ended the US Civil War.

Grant received the Republican nomination for president in the 1868 election. He defeated Horatio Seymour. the former Governor of New York), carrying 26 of the then-current 34 states. He was re-elected in 1872, soundly defeating Horace Greeley (Greeley did not win a single state).

After serving eight years as president, Grant returned to private life in 1877. After losing most of his money in a financial scandal, he began writing his memoirs while dying and in pain from throat cancer. He completed the effort just days before he passed, but his mission to provide for the financial security of his family was accomplished - Grant's book was very popular and a financial success.

Ulysses S. Grant died of mouth/throat cancer on July 23, 1885 at his home in Wilton, NY. Today, the house is known as the "Grant Cottage" and it has been restored and opened as a museum. Learn more here: https://www.grantcottage.org/

I encourage those with an interest to seek out out more detailed biographical information on Grant. A brief introduction can be found on the web site of The Miller Center at the University of Virginia: Ulysses S. Grant Biography. For those who want to dig deep, Grant's entire two-volume memoirs is available on-line at the Gutenberg Project: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/436...h/4367-h.htm

1922 Grant Birth Centenary Gold $1.00, Plain Variety


1922 Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar, Star Variety (Star is above "GRANT" on Obverse)





You can find my previous posts about the Grant coins, here:

- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar, Plain Variety
- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar, with Star Variety
- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar - Cousin
- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Coins - Coins with Beards Thread.
- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Coins - Coins Depicting Places Thread.
- 1922 Grant Birth Centenary Coins - Coins with Military Theme Thread


Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 09/23/2021  10:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fascinating!

Looking at the dates, I did not realize that Grant was the fourth youngest US President.
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 Posted 09/23/2021  12:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Looking at the dates, I did not realize that Grant was the fourth youngest US President.

And, by a margin of 7+ years, Joe Biden is the oldest at over 78 years of age.


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 Posted 09/23/2021  3:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The three oldest have all come in my lifetime.

The 15 youngest were all younger than I am now.
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 Posted 09/24/2021  07:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Back in 2016, the Royal Canadian Mint issued a four-coin "National Heroes" coin program intended to honor those who serve the public in their dailyy job, often facing significant personal risk and challenges.

Each of the coins in the series is 36.07 millimeters (mm) in diameter, has a weight of 23.17 grams of 0.9999 fine silver and carries a denomination of $15.

As I don't own any of these coins, I was hoping another CCF member would be able to post theirs as they are perfect additions to this thread. Until someone can post images of the coins in their collection, here are images provided by the Royal Canadian Mint for their 2016 "National Heroes" series.

The "KR" seen on each coin are the initials of Ken Ryan, the designer.

2016 National Heroes - Police


2016 National Heroes - Firefighter



2016 National Heroes - Paramedics



2016 National Heroes - Military



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