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1887 Victoria's Jubilee Clermont Medallion

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 8 / Views: 368Next Topic  
Valued Member
Australia
201 Posts
 Posted 09/12/2021  04:40 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add MachinMachinMan to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Found this beat up "coin" while going through some bulk world coins.

Queen Victoria caught my attention...

but I couldn't believe my eyes when I looked at the reverse.
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United States
62684 Posts
 Posted 09/12/2021  08:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Never seen that one before!
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Canada
4321 Posts
 Posted 09/12/2021  12:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's an interesting piece of racist political propaganda.
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Australia
201 Posts
 Posted 10/02/2021  03:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MachinMachinMan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I can't find any information about this medallion. Does it have any numismatical worth? (I don't mean money value)
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Australia
1880 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2021  02:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm sure it would - it's a historical medal.
How big is it?
Valued Member
Australia
201 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2021  03:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MachinMachinMan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's the size of a British or Australian penny (~31mm)

I've seen pictures of other Victoria Jubilee medallions that have exactly the same obverse. Seems it was the thing to do back in 1887 for all sorts organisations to knock up medallions to mark the Jubilee, no matter what business they were in.

They were made that way with the hole.
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Australia
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 Posted 10/09/2021  03:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coaster to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clermont,_Queensland 'In the 1880s up to 4000 Chinese people were resident in Clermont, mining for gold and copper. This led to racial riots and the Chinese were removed from the region in 1888'.
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Australia
1880 Posts
 Posted 10/10/2021  04:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't have any books on Australian medals but I'd assume it was made by whichever company made that same obverse.
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Australia
13910 Posts
 Posted 10/10/2021  8:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Seems it was the thing to do back in 1887 for all sorts organisations to knock up medallions to mark the Jubilee, no matter what business they were in.

Yes. 1887 was the big celebration, and many cities and towns had medal struck, mainly for giving away to schoolchildren for for presenting to anyone who attended the official festivities. The schoolchild ones are, understandably, more common than the event ones. This one isn't too scarce, and not hard to find in better condition. It was probably used both for schoolchildren and at the event.

If you think the numbers of 1887 medals were high, check out the medals issued for the diamond jubilee in 1897. Nearly twice as many.

As for the casual racism, well, that's just a sign of the times. You'll notice Aboriginal Australians weren't considered worthy of mention on the medal at all, even though the Native Police were busy ethnically cleansing them from central Queensland at this time. Chinese gold miners were stuck in a vicious circle of negative feedback. They were mistrusted, because they looked different, dressed different, believed different, and most of the gold they found was shipped back to China, and so they were shunned by mainstream community. They were nevertheless very successful in finding gold, particularly finding gold in places where the "white" gold-diggers had already been through and found nothing. This, of course, only made them even more hated. Chinese gold miners received much the same treatment wherever they went, be it California, British Columbia, New Zealand or Australia.

Interesting fact: The Chinese name for California was "Jinshan" (or Gan Saan in the Cantonese most miners would have spoken), meaning "Gold Mountain". Many of the Chinese miners in Australia came not directly from China, but from California and so they called their new home "Xin Jinshan", or "New Gold Mountain".

So, from a certain point of view, the original Chinese name for Australia was "New California".
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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