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Variations From The Eastern Caribbean States (Ecs):

 
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 Posted 10/15/2021  7:47 pm Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
The Eastern Caribbean Dollar was established in 1965 & the currency used for the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ...bbean_States

Originally, P-13a & P-13b the reverse listing included Barbados but not Grenada. P-13c-P-13f included Grenada on the circular reverse designation of member nations. P-13g to P-13p did not include Barbados. P-14 & P-15 ($5 & $20) followed the same pattern but there was no P-15p (St. Vincent). No $10 was issued. Do you have an uncommon variant (if so post it)?
The series was revised in 1985 - 1983 but some signatures (& suffixes) remain tougher than others. Do you know which signature or prefix/suffix combination is tough?

In 1993, the ECD had another design upgrade. However, it seems as if the marker # (ie: denomination) seemed to blend in with the background. It was hard to discern. The series was further revised (more opaque/easy to read background were markers are listed.

Here's a $20 from Anguilla (note how the suffix becomes the defining feature for this tough series).


Can you think of another example that's tough from this or any other nations/series?
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 Posted 10/18/2021  3:44 pm  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I actually posted the incorrect note (a newer 2000 $10) after I intended to post the one below.

Here's a $20 P-28u issued from Anguilla:



Let's see any EC notes you think may be tough ones to find.
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 Posted 11/04/2021  11:01 am  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Now for a bit of history:
As far as I can tell, currency in the Caribbean was first gold/silver imported from US, Spain, England & other Imperial colonizers throughout depending on each countries economic-political ties. I'm sure a lot of cheques & local species were used at the time. Later, chartered banks stepped in for more consistent/conventionalized paper currencies. For example, I do know that there was a Colonial bank (1920's) which was later succeeded by Barclay's & finally Canada's Royal bank produced notes for the island of St. Lucia. the introduction of the British West Indies dollar (or "BeeWee") was another attempt to standardized currency in the region.

Eventually, the British West Indies Currency Board (1949-1965) was established for British Guyana & the Caribbean Territories. They printed several colourful denominations which were issued out of Guyana & select islands (Barbados & Trinidad).
See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briti...ndies_dollar
and to see examples which featured King George VI & QEII:
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../BCT/BCT.htm
The denominations were $1, $2, $5, $10, $20 & $100 & served the West Indies Federation for about 15 years. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_...s_Federation
Of the nations which used this common currency, Jamaica (which felt left-out as they did not issue the notes) often felt short-changed by the system (& the population missed their pre-decimal pounds/shillings). They broke away in favour of their own currency along with Trinidad & Tobago & Grenada. These & other factors helped initiate the need for a new revised currency, & in 1965, the East Caribbean Dollar was formed.
These came in $1, $5 $20 & $100 (No $2, $10, nor $50 were printed) & were issued by the East Caribbean Currency Authority.

See the Ones here:
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../XCD0013.htm

Note their back design which lists the nations involved in a circular pattern around the watermark window (watermark is a profile of QEII):
P-13a and P-13b: Reverse listing of islands includes Barbados but not Grenada
P-13c to P-13f: Reverse listing of islands includes Barbados and Grenada
P-13g to P-13p: Reverse listing of islands does not include Barbados but includes Grenada

Here is P-14g the Five (unfortunately the watermark is not very visible):



Edited by walk2dwater
11/04/2021 11:07 am
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 Posted 11/04/2021  4:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for posting/sharing!

It's likely due to my familiarity with US paper money, but I find the "green" notes of the series to be more visually appealing (vs. the red or deep purple, for example).

I checked out the bank note web site for which you provided a link - very nice collection and presentation of notes! A very good reference source.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/04/2021 4:24 pm
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 Posted 11/05/2021  5:09 pm  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Nice examples! Thank your for sharing.

-Your welcome guys!
"Commems" I have found the bank note museum a treasure trove of interesting info. For example, if you click on the link below & examine the varieties for the 1965 $20 (P-15):
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../XCD0015.htm

- you cannot help but notice that P-15a, P-15c, P-15e(3) & P-15k are missing. Twenties from any of the different 1965 variations are tough (& command much higher than what you see on the SCWPM BV) but those four are particularly tough. Some collectors will dig a bit deeper (& know this) but many won't go that extra mile, so it is still not too difficult to acquire fairly tough notes for a decent price. One Hundred Dollar notes (P-16) are also very tough. The higher the denomination -the tougher the note tends to be (& this applies for all other Caribbean nations' currency (like Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Cayman, etc)

The next ECS series with a design change was released in 1985. The map of the EC islands did not include Anguilla in the front design until 1988. This was also when the Eastern Caribbean Bank used the SUFFIX letter to designate which island the note came from. T

The first note is a $1 from St. Lucia (suffix L) without Anguilla in the front design (1985):


Although these notes were printed for only 2 years it seems as if they became the more common variety than their successors which were printed from 1988-1992 (4 years) since the notes that include Anguilla seem more expensive.

Here is a Five from Montserrat (P-18m):


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 Posted 11/06/2021  09:10 am  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Lovely pair!


Thanks 'jbuck'

A now a word about the 1965 overprints & the 1985 suffix letter designations.

In 1985, when the ECS central bank had issued the new $1.00 the designs for the $5 & $20 were still not ready. Sometime before this (likely mid-70's) the ECS had decided to link overprinted letters with the independent nation the note was released from. This helped acknowledge each nations uniquene identity, keep the population well supplied (satisfied) with the ECS central system (not repeat history of dissatisfaction that occurred with Jamaica & the unpopular "BeeWee," for example). So $1, $5 & $20 from the 1965 series had a circular overprint and one of the following letters inside this circle:

A = Antigua
D = Dominica
G = Grenada
K = St. Kitts
L = St Lucia
M = Montserrat
U = Anguilla
V = St. Vincent

When collecting ECS notes it is important to remember that the $1 like the note I posted from St. Lucia was being released at the same time as the old 1965 $5 & $20 with the above letters & circular overprints codifying their origin. There was overlap in the release of these two series (much like there has been in other countries). This system had already started with the $1 and $5 and later with the $20, so that P-15h is from Antigua & a much later release than P-15a to P-15g.
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c...0015.htm#15j

Lower denominations would wear out faster than the higher denominations & I imagine the higher denominations (especially the $20 & $100) came out in trickles (as needed). The reason I point this out is that many collectors assume that the early issues P-14a-d are the most scarce & dismiss the letter overprinted variety. However, that's not always the case. Latter varieties with circular overprints (especially in the $20 & $100) can be scarce since they were likely replaced by the newer series.

The TWO new 1985 SERIES employ SUFFIXES to link nations: after the popularity of the first overprint system. The suffixes follow the same designation as listed above & signifies the origin of the banknote's issue.

Another similar assumption occurs with the 1985-1987 (P-17 to P-20) & the modified 1985-1988 (P-21 to P-25) corrected series (that included Anguilla in the map design). Collectors often assume that the first series is tougher than the second modified (with Anguilla) version. I have often found it harder to find notes with Anguilla (especially P-21 $1.00) than without. It may have been that everyone got plenty of the new issue but then forgot about it when two years later, the printers have modified the design (quietly) not to bring attention to the oversight. We'll never know.

The modified series also has 2 signatures (Cecil Jacobs & Dwight Venner) and the SCWPM has attributed both as being equally tough. I suspect that the second (last) signature variety to be the tougher of the two.

Here's the TEN DOLLARS (from St. Lucia), which features the first Jacob's signature:



The SCWPM also assigns equal Book Value to each nation but there is a wide discrepancy in terms of availability. I have found Dominica (D) & Anguilla (U) the toughest in the lower denominations.
Edited by walk2dwater
11/06/2021 09:17 am
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 Posted 11/06/2021  2:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@walk2dwater: Thanks for the additional background information and note images. Enjoying both!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 11/07/2021  09:39 am  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Thanks for the additional background information and note images. Enjoying both!


-Thanks 'commems' for the positive feedback. I'd just like to point out that much of what I've written has been drawn from my personal experience living in Jamaica (1995-1996) & St. Lucia (1997) plus trying to assemble a collection of ECS currency over the past 3 years. Some of the manner in the way banknotes have been released is based on speculation (for example, in Canada we have had series overlap several times) & some comes from discussions/observations made by the local population.

It is also interesting to note how the SCWPM could not document currency unless it was reported to them. This provided a site like the banknote museum a distinct advantage in reporting notes that were missed earlier by the Krause publication.

If we look at the modified 1985-1988 (P-21 to P-25) corrected series (that included Anguilla in the map design) again, you will notice that this is the first time the ECS introduce the TEN DOLLAR denomination & that P-21a and P-21v ONE DOLLAR notes have asterisks. The * beside the $1.00 from Antigua & St. Vincent indicate that they were first MISSED by the SCWPM. These & the well-worn M (Montserrat) prefixed ONES can be tough to source so don't be surprised to see bidding wars for these revised designed notes in higher grades. Check out:
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../XCD0021.htm

There are also similar discrepancies & gaps in the larger denominations (so it pays to be on the look out for these).
The banknote museum is missing P-22m (Montserrat) for the FIVE DOLLARS & if you check out the link for this note, you will discover that images of well-worn notes are often the tough ones to source.

For P-23 TEN DOLLARS, I myself was first in search of a Dwight Venner note (from any island) but eventually settled for the 'Jacobs' signature pictured from St. Lucia (where I lived for a year). You will see that notes with the second signature are still missing for P-23g2 (Grenada) & P-23v2 (St. Vincent).

These 1980 series are attractive but only have a thin security strip. In 1993, the ECS must have felt compelled to up the ante in that regard since their new design has a much more complicated design. This is the year they first introduce the FIFTY DOLLAR denomination (P-29). The design employs the same portrait of QEII but the horizontal serial number gradually increases in size. Several of the design elements remain the same but they're just jostled around or re-positioned on the note, with design weaves and splashes of colour to create a bolder look. The one flaw is that the denomination marker (numeral) overlaps a patterned square. This makes the denomination tough to read (is that a $20 or $50) for those with visual impairments (or even in poor lighting). I had seen a few while living in St. Lucia and they were easy to mix up.

I posted a 1993 $2o from Anguilla on October 18th. Here is a cropped image of the same note:


They're not that difficult to find but their prices are steadily rising since they did last for only one short year (so demand outpaces supply).

The 1994 series also reviseD the design of the FIFTY DOLLARS (P-34) due to confusion with the colour scheme of this note with P-35 ($100). I remember my good friend cursing this note once as he had thought he had a $100 when in fact it was a $50 so they were very unpopular. Note that P-34m (6000 notes) from Montserrat were stolen & that the banknote museum lists this variation as likely not issued. I think this gives one a good appreciation how low the numbers of these notes can be in terms of # issued.
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../XCD0034.htm

I have to say that I have rarely seen high denominations on eBay for any of the Commonwealth island nations that include QEII but these ECS $20, $50 & $100 can be very tough to source (just as they are for Bahamas, Belize, Bermuda, Cayman & early Trinidad). They were never that tough to find when I lived in the region (only tough to get in high grade so I never kept any).
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 Posted 11/07/2021  6:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Orac to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for all this work!
I collect EC Dollars from St Lucia, as I worked there for a few months back in the 1990s. I also tried to get them in UNC back then, which was impossible, so I kept the best of what I could find, sort of unused GVFish.

I found getting St Lucia notes was a bit of a challenge as I was working off a mixed circulation pool. Even though St Lucia is one of the bigger island populations, it was a smaller issue in proportion to all the others combined. Good fun though! I never did get time to go into the bank in Castries!
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 Posted 11/08/2021  5:16 pm  Show Profile   Check walk2dwater's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add walk2dwater to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks 'jbuck,' 'commems' & 'Orac' for following this thread & providing some feedback or insight into your experiences. If there are any World currency collectors, or collectors from the region, & you would like to add, please feel free to do so. 'Orac' I actually did receive some decent banknotes from an ATM one time while living near Castries (they were $10 or $20 I believe). But, unfortunately, I just didn't have enough spare money to tuck away either (& at the time I had made a commitment to collect BoC (Canadian) currency exclusively.

Anyway, I'd just like to close up by summarizing what occurred to the various series up to the recent VERTICAL designs.

Allow me to back up a little once again. The 1994 series was unremarkable other than the fact that the square box obscuring the denomination MARKER was removed & that P-34 FIFTY DOLLARS had a significant colour overhaul (aqua-marine blue tint added to avoid confusion with the $100 P-35). This was a problem that often occurred between the 1993 $50 & $100 (as the colour schemes were similar -esp in poor light). I have also found it quite ironic that 1993 series was the 1st year the bar codes were added to aid the visually impaired to ID each denomination (& yet the 1993 series failed so miserably to be easily identified). The revised 1994 series got rid of the squares (& the funky fonts) so that the MARKER numerals were much clearer to distinguish.

In 1998, the $100 had a gold foil orchid shaped security device added to the FRONT (Obverse) for additional suggesting it may have been subject to counterfeiting.

In the 2000 Series, 2 unique gold foiled fish were added to the $5 & $10, a butterfly graced the $10 & two types of flowers were added to the $50 & $100. Foiled security devices would be a feature of the next design upgrades. I added an example of the $10 on my initial post & below is a $5 from Montserrat (P-37m):



In 2003 P-42 to P-46 have squared off silver foiled security devices (of the same themes) replacing the gold foil optical devices. This also happens to be the last series to employ suffix association to island member states.

In 2008, P-47 to P-51, suffix designation designation is replaced by 2 letter prefixes. All islands received similar notes (no member state signified). Here's an example of P-47 ($5):


-this note has the AD prefix. It would be interesting to know what the last prefix of this series was for each denomination.

In 2012 & 2015 the ECCB notes P-52 to P-55 have one more significant design modification. The first series (2012) indicated by an (a), so that P-52a has a QEII watermark on the $10, while P-52b has no watermark, but an extra thick segmented security strip. Also note that in 2012, the $5 has been retired. See the link below for examples of the two different TEN DOLLAR denominations:
http://www.banknote.ws/COLLECTION/c.../XCD0052.htm

I have found almost all of the variations (suffixes) from 1994 until today to be fairly easy to acquire if one wants to obtain these. The only challenging notes are typically the higher denominations from 1993 back to 1965.
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 Posted 11/08/2021  5:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
More lovely examples.

These topics, like the one Commems created for the Bahamas, have provided me an opportunity to appreciate varied differences in otherwise similar banknote designs. I have come to appreciate them like I have the die varieties on coins.
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 Posted 11/08/2021  6:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@walk2dwater: Thanks for the series of ECS posts. I've never really looked into the notes of the Eastern Caribbean States, so I enjoyed the show!

I can see myself pursuing a set of the $5.00 notes at some point.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/08/2021 6:13 pm
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