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Error- 1971 Silver New-Pence 2 P Coin - Accurate Valuation Needed

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 11 / Views: 472Next Topic  
New Member

United Kingdom
6 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  4:51 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I have a 1971 silver new pence 2p error coin, I'm looking for a accurate valuation iv seen price range from 180 up to 2k, is there anyone out there that can narrow down the price to its actual worth. Many thanks
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United States
112066 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  5:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
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Australia
14255 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  5:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hello and welcome.

If you have a "silver two pence coin", the most likely explanation for it is that it has been plated. People plate coins for all sorts of reasons. Some people would plate 2 pence coins and hope to pass them for 10 pence (which were about the same size). Doing this is, of course, illegal.

To make any kind of assessment about your coin, we will need:
- Clear photos of your actual coin
- An accurate weight, in grams to at least two decimal places. If it weighs about 7.12 grams, then it's almost certainly not a "wrong planchet" error.

Actual mint errors, where the Mint has used the wrong metal or a wrong planchet, are possible but extremely rare (which is why they are valuable).

Because these genuine mint errors are so rare, there is no "fixed price" or "catalogue value" for them - they are worth whatever people on the day are prepared to pay.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
19560 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  5:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with Sap.

Interestingly, in 1992,
The Royal Mint produced proof silver 10 Pence coins in both smaller and larger sizes as well as in copper nickel.
New Member
United Kingdom
6 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  6:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's weird it's not magnetic, which makes sense because before 1992 "silver" coins were made of alloy of 75%copper and 25%nickel, and its not plated from a small scratch test done, it weighs 7.09g
New Member
United Kingdom
6 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  7:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
New Member
United Kingdom
6 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  7:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Bedrock of the Community
Australia
19560 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  7:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Coin pictured may have been rubbed with mercury
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Australia
14255 Posts
 Posted 11/10/2021  11:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A weight of 7.09 grams implies to me it's a (slightly worn) perfectly normal bronze 2p coin, that has been plated.

And your coin has seen significant circulation, with all those scratches and dents. If it had left the mint that colour, surely somebody would have noticed it.

The most common form of plating is electroplating. In electroplating, a coin is attached to wires and dipped in a solution of the chemical being plated. The wire attachment points tend to be unplated, thus an electroplated coin normally has at least one "hole" in the plating, a spot (usually on the edge somewhere) where the true colour of the metal shows through. It is possible to double-treat a coin to hide the telltale hole, but that's more trouble than it's worth for most people who are going around plating coins.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
New Member
United Kingdom
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 Posted 11/11/2021  08:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Already stated scratch test has been done it isn't plated..coins from 1971- 1992 for 10p where copper nickel alloy.. after 1992 there are nickel plated steel, deffo isn't Mercury it would weigh alot more that 7.09g if it was
New Member
United Kingdom
6 Posts
 Posted 11/11/2021  08:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lewist89 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For example 1ml of murcury weighs 13.5g
Valued Member
United Kingdom
227 Posts
 Posted 11/13/2021  07:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Collector28 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It is plated, perhaps not with mercury but definitely with something. I know you want to feel like you've hit the jackpot, but unfortunately in this case you haven't. As Sap stated, it is clearly well circulated (NOT a weak strike, because there are all the tell-tale dings of circulation present on the fields) and there's no way it could have circulated that much if it was a genuine error - somebody would have noticed it. The weight is also a dead giveaway - if it weighed significantly less (or more) than 7.12g then there might be reason to suspect it was a wrong planchet error, but 7.09g is consistent with it being an ordinary, right-planchet 2p that saw significant circulation.

You only have to think about it logically to realise that it's ridiculously unlikely that something as noticeably different as that would receive the circulation that it did - somebody would have noticed.
Edited by Collector28
11/13/2021 07:27 am
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